egyptian gods and goddesses

Nut Aesthetic

Nut was the Egyptian sky-goddess, whose body created a canopy over the earth. Her body arches across the sky, wearing a dress decorated with stars. She was the sister and wife of Geb, the god of the Earth. She was also the mother of Isis, Osiris, Nepthys and Seth. The ancient Egyptians believed that at the end of the day, Nut swallowed the sun god, Ra, and gave birth to him again the next morning.

sekhmet · goddess of war and destruction

Sekhmet was the lioness-headed goddess of war and destruction. She was the sister and wife of Ptah. She was created by the fire of Re’s eye. Re created her as a weapon of vengence to destroy men for their wicked ways and disobedience to him. She is generally portrayed as a woman with the head of a lioness surmounted by the solar disk and the uraeus. The name “Sekhmet” comes from the root sekhem which means “to be strong, mighty, violent”. She was identified with the goddess Bastet, and they were called the Goddesses of the West (Sekhmet) and the East (Bastet). Both were shown with the heads of lionesses

requested by: @oblivions-kiss

The Mythology of Nut, Mother of Gods

One of the oldest goddesses in Egyptian mythology is Nut, the goddess of the sky and the mother of gods. It was believed that that the sky is, in fact, a star-covered nude woman arched over the earth in a plank or perhaps ‘down-dog’ position.  Due to her supposed role in the regeneration of the sun each day, Nut came to be considered a protector of souls as they entered the afterlife.

isis · goddess of magic

As the wife of Osiris, Isis assisted her husband during his earthly reign. In the Pyramid Texts, allusions are made that indicate that Isis foresaw her husband’s murder. Following his death, Isis tirelessly searched for his body so that he may be properly buried and may rest in peace in the Underworld. Through her magic, she brought Osiris back to life so that he could impregnate her with their son Horus. Isis was a great magician and is famous for the use of her magical skills. For example, she created the first cobra and used it’s venomous bite to coerce Re into revealing his secret name.

Nut

Originally the Goddess of the nighttime sky, but eventually became referred to as simply the Sky Goddess. Her themes are air and health. Her symbols are a pot, turquoise, musk, a star, wind and cow images. She is considered one of the oldest deities among the Egyptian pantheon. 

Her brother and husband is the earth-god Geb. Nut and Geb were married in secret against the will of Ra, the one-time King of the Gods. When Ra found them coupling, he had Shu the air-god violently seperate them, forcing Geb to the earth, where his body’s contours became the hills, and lifting Nut into the sky. Since then they have always been separated, and Geb has been inconsolable. Ra then forbade Nut to have her children on any day of the year. But Thoth, god of wisdom, helped her, by winning at gaming with the Moon. From his winnings–which were a little of the Moon’s light–Thoth made five extra days that were outside the year, and Nut was able to give birth to her five children. 

Like Hathor, Nut can take the form of a cow. She is also depicted as a slender woman whose arched body touches the earth with only the tips of her fingers and her tippy-toes, her starry body forming the heavens. Nut’s fingers and toes were believed to touch the four cardinal points or directions of north, south, east, and west.

2

Two Ancient Egyptian gold rings, the ring on the left dating to the Roman period (1st-2nd century CE), perhaps with the goddesses Nephthys and Isis intertwined. The ring on the right dates to 664-343 BCE, the hieroglyphs inscribed mentioning perhaps the goddess Sekhmet and the god Hapy. Both images found on Christie’s.

~Keket, goddess of chaos and darkness~
“The waves were dead; the tides were in their grave,
The moon, their mistress, had expir’d before;
The winds were wither’d in the stagnant air,
And the clouds perish’d; Darkness had no need
Of aid from them—She was the Universe.“
               -Darkness by Lord Byron

anuket · water goddess of elephantine 

Anuket was originally a water goddess from Sudan. Her name meant, “to embrace” which was interpreted to mean that her embrace during the annual Nile floods fertilized the fields. Later, she became a goddess of lust, whose attributes and cult were obscene. However, her cult’s origins can be traced back to the Old Kingdom. She is closely associated with Nubia. She is not an imported goddess though. Anuket was generally depicted as a woman wearing a tall headdress made either of reeds or of ostrich feathers, often holding a sceptre and the ankh symbol, but was occasionally shown in the form of a gazelle.