egyptian arts

Magic Sands: Chapter 1: Calling

Chapter 1: Calling

“Erin! Would you get your dumb ass down here before you break your fucking neck!”

A redhead man looked down from the ladder he was on, letting out a mischievous laugh. He adjusted his glasses as he closed the book in front of him and placed it back on the large book shelf.

“Come on Terry, I’m not that bad.” Erin stepped down off the ladder with ease, he lifted his hands up to show he was safe and sound on the ground in front of his worried friend. “See, I didn’t fall? Now stop worrying.”

Terry ran a hand in over his shiny bald head, it glistened in the imitation light. The old friend sighed, looking over at the youth with tired eyes.

“I’m gonna die of stress because of you.” He let his eyes wander up to where Erin was lingering. “Still studying up on Egypt huh? You know, I could recommend some college AP classes you can take now.”

Erin shoved his hands in his pockets, his school uniform dusty from his time up on the old bookshelf people hardly touched any more. His mismatched brown and blue eyes wavered in a hidden joy.

“I can’t believe this is my last year in high school.” Erin’s lips started to quiver as he looked over at the old man. “This is the last year you will be my teacher. What am I going to do without you?” A fake and loud cry escaped from the youth’s lips, causing his teacher to pinch the bridge of his nose to let his stress out.

“I don’t know? Die or something because you NEVER look where you are going…” Terry started walking, leaving the old section of the library and having Erin close behind him. The youth was about to say something, but was quickly silenced when he smacked into the corner of a bookshelf. “How in the hell am I gonna let you go out in the wild like this. Look at you!”


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Fayum Mummy Portraits, dating from around 30 BC to the mid 3rd century AD. 

The portrait heads were attached to Egyptian mummies of the Roman period, covering the faces of the deceased In the top pictures, you can see now they were bound to the mummy. Dating from the time of the Roman occupation of Egypt, they are closest to Graeco-Roman artistic traditions. Around 900 are known to survive and they are some of the only surviving evidence of Classical panel painting traditions. Due to their burial in hot, dry conditions with the bodies, many have survived in excellent condition. 

The term Fayum comes from an area of graveyards (necropoli) where they were found in large numbers, buried in communal catacombs. 

Painted on wooden board (and sometimes on cloth), either in encaustic (wax) or egg tempera. 

I started 2016 off with a goddess & wanted to end it with a goddess! 
Bastet is the most requested illustration I get across social media, so this is also a HUGE **thank you for 10,000** followers here on Tumblr! (ノ∀\*)
Your love and support means so much to meee! ♡♡♡ 
Wishing you all the best in 2017! 

anubis · jackal god of mummification

The jackal-god of mummification, he assisted in the rites by which a dead man was admitted to the underworld. Anubis was worshipped as the inventor of embalming and who embalmed the dead Osiris and thereby helping to preserve him that he might live again.

Anubis is portrayed as a man with the head of a jackal holding the divine sceptre carried by kings and gods; as simply a black jackal or as a dog accompanying Isis. His symbol was a black and white ox-hide splattered with blood and hanging from a pole. It’s meaning is unknown.

requested by: @katiecro28 (sorry I took so long)

albaharuland  asked:

Hi! I wanted to ask about fantasy world building based on a mix of cultures, even if those cultures are totally different. For example, a country that has an architecture based on egyptian and arab art, or one that is a mix between indian and russian architecture. I dont know if that would be appropiation or offensive, or how to avoid it or doing it in a respectful way. Also if there is a problem only using the art part and having a different made up traditions/lore (thanks for your time!)

On Combining Cultures Respectfully, Art, and Architecture

“Does it make sense within the world”

Avatar: the Last Airbender mixes Inuit and Japanese culture. Is this any form of sensical in the modern world? Sort of, with how there’s a language link between Siberia and the Canadian Arctic. Does it make sense within the confines of A:tLA? Absolutely yes.

I’m not against the concept of cultural blending. It just has to be sensical within the world itself. They might not be neighbours in the real world, but if you end up with a culture that’s “ocean-heavy Arctic on top of Asia”, then Inuit+ Japan makes tons of sense. But had it been even “continental Arctic”, then the Inuit influence would’ve barely made any sense at all, because they’re really not a continental people.

-Mod Lesya

Like mixed-race characters, blending real-world cultures in fantasy isn’t prima facie a problem, but you’d better make sure it makes sense within the world you’re constructing.  Lots of times authors fall prey to the “Rule of Cool” and just throw in things they think are neat without thinking about how they could have reasonably got there.

In the cases you mentioned, there are some historiocultural overlaps between Indian and Russian cultures (for instance, similar building materials, similar types of timbers in temperate parts of India and southern Russia, very deep cultural roots shared between Slavic and certain Indic cultures, etc.) that would give you a foundation to build on.  Other times shared cultural aspects have a common but non-native root—for instance the Russian onion dome and characteristic Indian Taj Mahal-style dome may have a shared origin in Islamic and Middle Eastern architecture.  Islamic culture is native to neither India nor Russia, but it touched and influenced both areas extensively.

Similar constraints hold for Egyptian and Arab art and architecture.  They used similar building materials but produced different results because the culture and artistic preferences were historically different, but we know that Arab culture strongly influenced Egyptian art and architecture in the Islamic period (think going from pyramids to Graeco-Roman amphitheaters to mosques and minarets, but all made out of limestone, mud brick, and very little wood).  Saladin Ahmed’s fantasy novel(s) feature an Islamic/Middle Eastern-influenced culture built on top of a dead Ancient Egypt-analogue [Nikhil’s note: I’m reading this right now and it’s awesome and you should too].

But regardless of the cultural influence, the material culture stays similar in place—in some Indo-Russian hybrid you might be looking at imported marble and precious stones for those buildings whose patrons could afford it, provided they have access to those materials either through production or trade, but for poorer constructions you’re looking at local building materials—so maybe thatch and half-timber framing and wattle-and-daub in Indo-Russia, or stone and mud brick in a desert environment like Arabegypt.  Art and architecture are functions of culture, and culture as a primitive exercise arises from the local environment, since it’s only once you get to the level of at least an organized economic community that outside trade starts to be a significant factor, which would facilitate creating art and architecture that would be exotic to the local environment.

-Mod Nikhil