eggs nest

anonymous asked:

What do you think Blake meant when he said he wants to protect his home life now? I think it was an important statement in his thinking.

Well, it may explain why we hardly ever get snaps and/or IG stories.  I personally think Blake is truly happy and at peace.  He loves his home life now.  Gwen, the kids, the supportive nature of the vibe in the house.  He seems to be in ‘building that nest-egg’ mode.  He’s releasing music he likes over music that would be more popular with current country radio. And he’s into ventures that will generate $$ in the future as the new, younger crop of country stars take over.  He wants to protect the good place he’s in and he has Gwen and the kids to think of.

- B

What we Learned from This Comic
  • Torbjorn: old fella who is reasonable towards omnics who clearly pose little threat and willing to give chances to the deserving
  • Bastion: Peaceful omnic who just wants to live in nature. Willing to happily co-exist with humans.
  • Ganymede: "Ill kick everyone's ass. Ill kick YOUR ass. Ill kick you TURRET's ass. Ill kick my OWN ass-"
4

The male jacana chosen to parent the chicks, called the receiver, is a devoted father.  He will construct a floating nest by uprooting aquatic plants and stamping or shoving them together to create a dense and tough platform.  He may create several of these nests at several different sites before the female is satisfied with one.  After she has laid the eggs, parenting falls almost entirely on him; the female may shade the eggs from strong sunlight, defend the nest from predators, or incubate the eggs if the male is having a hard time finding food, but otherwise she is uninvolved.  Incubating the eggs is the male’s responsibility; he will even move the eggs to a different site if he feels the nest is unsafe.

 After the chicks are born, they rarely leave their father’s side; he will guide them to food, keep them warm, and violently chase rivals away.  The male African jacana (last three images) goes one step further; should danger present itself, the male can literally tuck his chicks under his wings and carry them away.

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natgeo Video @jenniferhayesig // A titan triggerfish rises from its nest to tell our team to move along in Anilao Philippines. Titans aggressively defend their nests from raiding fish, eels and passing divers. Once we saw that this wonderful creature had eggs to protect we moved on to stop distracting her from the nest while dozens of wrasse and a few moray eels steal in to gobble the eggs. If you watch closely this titan returns to the nest and lays flat across it to hide it from hungry wrasse. As this was happening the male, out of frame, swam wide circles several feet above us. From on location for @natgeoassignment Philippines

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natgeoVideo by @tbfrost and @melissalesh It turns out even baby crocodiles have an itch sometimes! But be careful , if you itch too hard you might take a tumble.

The mosquitoes in the swamp where this was filmed were awful, almost as bad as the far north , places like Canada and Alaska and Greenland, and as you can see they bothered the crocodiles too. This baby saltwater crocodile (crocodylus porosus) is only minutes old, just hatched out of its egg and climbed and clawed its way out of the earthen mound nest its mother made about 90 days earlier. Most saltwater crocodile nests have 40-60 eggs, this one had about that , though only 15 or so ever emerged. And of those 15 it is likely that only 1 will survive to adulthood. The rest will be picked off by birds, snakes, pigs, and even other crocodiles. It is a tough life and northern Australia is a harsh place. In many cases the mother crocodile will guard her nest until the baby crocs hatch. She knows they are ready when they start calling from inside the egg at which point she will help dig them from the nest and even carry them to the water in her mouth. It Is not uncommon for the mother croc to then spend two months with her offspring to protect them