egg and bird

4

The male jacana chosen to parent the chicks, called the receiver, is a devoted father.  He will construct a floating nest by uprooting aquatic plants and stamping or shoving them together to create a dense and tough platform.  He may create several of these nests at several different sites before the female is satisfied with one.  After she has laid the eggs, parenting falls almost entirely on him; the female may shade the eggs from strong sunlight, defend the nest from predators, or incubate the eggs if the male is having a hard time finding food, but otherwise she is uninvolved.  Incubating the eggs is the male’s responsibility; he will even move the eggs to a different site if he feels the nest is unsafe.

 After the chicks are born, they rarely leave their father’s side; he will guide them to food, keep them warm, and violently chase rivals away.  The male African jacana (last three images) goes one step further; should danger present itself, the male can literally tuck his chicks under his wings and carry them away.

3

Can’t believe it so happy! I was given this old box of bird skulls and eggs by a parents friend who inherited it! Birds I’ve identified: 2 razorbill, guillemot, great black backed gull, teal, gannet, jackdaw, carrion crow, kestrel/sparrowhawk, blackbird, mute swan, shag, pheasant and house sparrow. 
There are loads of beautiful British bird eggs which are over 80 years old with some being even older. Please note I live in the UK where there is no migratory bird act and the age of the eggs makes them fine to own.

Photo by Kerstin Langenberger

“I see the glaciers calving, retreating dozens to hundreds of meters every year. I see the pack ice disappearing in record speed. Yes, I have seen bears in good shape – but I have also seen dead and starving polar bears. Bears walking on the shores, looking for food, bears trying to hunt reindeer, eating birds’ eggs, moss and seaweed. And I realized that the fat bears are nearly exclusively males which stay on the pack ice all year long. The females, on the other hand, which den on land to give birth to their young, are often slim. With the pack ice retreating further and further north every year, they tend to be stuck on land where there’s not much food.”  -  Kerstin Langenberger