educational justice

Some things about Net Neutrality being threatened that I haven’t seen many comments on:

- The OOOONNLY people benefiting from this possible rollback are corporate shareholders. 

- The removal of NN would result in few if any new jobs whatsoever, so any argument that it would help the economy is null and void (btw, we’re not actually in a recession anymore, in case anyone still thought that. The US’s economy, while it has plateaued in actual growth at about 2%, it’s actually pretty high in the business cycle.)

- Limitation and partisan censorship is a major concern (I lied that one is what everyone is talking about)

- In fact it will HURT online businesses, which will damage the small business sector in general.

- And last but not least: It is going to have a majorly negative impact on the education system. I just finished highschool in May and let me tell you, even rural schools are getting more and more technology and internet dependent. Students frequently, if not regularly, are sent home with online assignments. How can students possibly be expected to finish an online homework assignment if they can’t even remotely begin to afford internet? This is already an issue in rural and poor and POC dominated areas, and should Net Neutrality be removed and access to the internet be placed back into money hungry corporate hands, it will be an even more massive and far worse problem that will only perpetuate low education levels in these areas. what if their assignment requires research on a website that their partisan provider has decided to censor? You get a zero. Especially if you’re a college student that can’t afford another $150 a month just to get ok-ish internet speeds. 

- This gives me great concern for marginalized and outcast kids. The internet has been one of the very, very few places where LGBT+ and POC children and people in general can go and feel safe and accepted and loved and celebrated for how/who they are. Imagine that that’s the ONLY place you feel safe and okay and then that gets taken away from you. Early teen suicide rates are already high enough. 

This is all just a disgusting money grab by the GOP and other politicians who are invested in cable and cellular companies. Call or message your congressional representatives to oppose. Drown them in resistance. I’ve already found several posts with links that let you do that. 

Shabbat is especially recommended for activists… I was zealous for my causes, and these were many– US imperialism in Central America, violence against women, homelessness, and nuclear power and weapons were a few of the social ills I felt compelled to change.  The Talmud teaches, ‘If you have the ability to influence the people of your city not to do wrong and you do nothing, you are also responsible for the wrongdoing.’  This is the rabbinic statement on complicity. I did not want to be complicit…My physical and emotional limitations banged up against my moral urgency to repair the world.  What to do?  Shabbat is a Jewish response, providing tools to navigate such moral and ultimately irreconcilable dilemmas….There is a rhythm to the universe.  We act and build and create and repair for six days, and then we stop.
—  David Jaffee, “Changing the World from the Inside Out,” 212-213; Babylonian Talmud Shabbat 54b

Submit your questions for a new Issue Time on transgender body positivity! 

You can submit questions here until Wednesday 2/22. Answers will be posted on Refinery29′s tumblr Saturday 2/25. Anyone is welcome to participate, but we especially want to help transgender and nonbinary people of all genders.

And now, meet our panelists…

Rylan Jay Testa, Ph.D., Psychology Professor

Dr. Rylan Jay Testa is an Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department at Rhodes College and the Director of the Health Behavior and Disparities Lab. Dr. Testa is a clinical psychologist and transgender man whose research focuses on understanding and preventing self-destructive health-related behaviors, such as suicide, eating disorders, and substance abuse in marginalized communities.

Daniel Friedman, Founder of Bindle & Keep

Daniel Friedman is founder of Bindle & Keep, a NYC-based custom suit company serving all gender identities. He also costars in the HBO film SUITED which follows the stories of five gender nonconforming people in their journey to wear clothes that accurately reflect the way they feel. 

Justice Roe Williams, Executive Director of BodyImage4Justice & Fitness Coach for JusticeBodies

Justice Roe Williams is a published poet originally from Atlantic City, New Jersey.  He is a founding Director of BodyImage4Justice (BI4J), an holistic wellness and fitness program for the LGBTQ community that primarily focuses on Trans Bodies. Prior to his work at BI4J, Justice organized to free political prisoners for low income communities and young people in the South End, Dorchester, Jamaica Plain and Roxbury areas of Boston.

Aydian Dowling, CEO of Point5cc and Point of Pride

Aydian Dowling is a Transgender Activist and Entrepreneur, owner of Point5cc Clothing and President/Founder of Point of Pride, Non Profit. Aydian has documented his transition since 2009 via his Youtube Channel, ALionsFears, and is most commonly known to be the first Transgender Man on the cover of the worlds biggest mens magazine, Men’s Health.

Precious Davis, Diversity & Inclusion at Columbia College Chicago and LGBTQ Activist

Precious Davis is lauded nationally as an award winning diversity professional, social justice facilitator, and educator.  She currently is the Assistant Director of Diversity Recruitment Initiatives at Columbia College Chicago, her alma mater from which she received a BA in Liberal Arts. Precious currently implements and oversees the Campus Wide Diversity Initiative and is the first woman of color to hold this position.

Davis finds deep meaning in engaging individuals in conversations surrounding bias, bigotry, and prejudice in their communities on the basis and belief that humans can coexist with one another positively through the embracing of each other’s differences and the celebrating of  each others human diversity. With over 15 years of diversity training, leadership development, and social justice education experience Precious is a highly demanded speaker and panelist who has been featured at: The University of Chicago, Northwestern University, The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, The University of Michigan, The Chicago Community Trust, Reed College, Hampshire College, and Loyola University Chicago.

SUBMIT QUESTIONS HERE

DISGRACEFUL: Trump Administration Puts Transgender Kids at Risk

Today, the Trump Administration announced that it would rescind a vital guidance from the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education regarding schools’ obligations to transgender students under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. This crucial guidance was meant to ensure that transgender students are treated fairly in public and federally funded schools, including having equal access to sex-segregated facilities, such as restrooms and locker rooms.

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Ex Baltimore cop Michael Wood admits Justice System is Engineered to Oppress the group of people they like the least on the Joe Rogan Experience 2/2
Ex Baltimore cop Michael Wood gives brutally honest interview on the Joe Rogan Experience 2/2 Subscribe To Our Expansion Channel: https://www.youtube.com/cha...

Originally posted by n-wordbelike

Reblog if 2017 is the year we stop interrogating d/Deaf/HoH people

If a d/Deaf/HoH person tells you that they are d/Deaf/HoH, you believe them. No questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH person wants to communicate orally with/or without lip reading, using sign language, gesturing, cued speech, using their cell phone, or pen and paper, you respect their decision. No questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH person speaks, do not comment on the “quality” or “tone” of their speech. If they choose to speak to communicate that’s their choice, no matter how it may sound to you. No compliments given, no criticism given, and again, no questions asked.

If a d/Deaf/HoH people talks/listens on the phone, uses hearing aids/cochlear implants, speaks clearly, grew up hearing, reads lips, etc, you will respect what they tell you about their being d/Deaf/HoH. No questions asked.

2017 is already an amazing year for equality, support, solidarity, and inclusion. Let’s band together to make the lives of d/Deaf/HoH people a little easier, and allow them to breathe easier when communicating with hearing people. 

Please reblog and add your own “d/Deaf/HoH No Questions asked”! I want to see what y’all have to say! 

Keep reading

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It’s good to see the tolerant left engaging in civil debate with stances they don’t agree with in a calm educational setting.

That was sarcasm in case you couldn’t tell…

For those that don’t know, an alt-right Breitbart news editor, Milo Yiannopoulos was scheduled to speak at Berkley tonight.

Instead of voicing their opinions through debate, peaceful protests, or public education/awareness efforts, the students of Berkley chose to create the scene pictured above. The rioters started fires, threw moltov cocktails, lit fireworks in buildings, and ultimately destroyed a lot of both public and private property.

Their main goal? To seemingly silence Yiannopoulos from voicing his message to those who wanted to listen.

What did they accomplish instead? They destroyed their own campus. On top of that, they ensured hours of coverage for Milo on numerous news networks across the country; they’ve only amplified his voice a thousandfold.

I by no means agree with Yiannopoulos’ ideals, but this is simply unacceptable. Universities are meant to be a place for free speech and healthy intellectual conversations.

What if I were to tell you that you can disagree with someone, and not create literal dumpster fires?

This is not a victory. This is sad.

Stories about black women whose employers asked them to cut their dreadlocks or to trim their big afros have surfaced with more frequency in the last few years. Now a new study confirms that many people —including black ones— have a bias against the types and styles of natural hair worn by black people.

The “Good Hair Study” was conducted by Perception Institute, which describes itself as “a consortium of researchers, advocates and strategists” that uses emotional and psychological research to identify and reduce bias in areas such as law enforcement, education, civil justice and the workplace. The study resulted from a partnership with Shea Moisture, a black-owned hair and body products company, and aimed to better understand the connection between implicit bias and textured hair.

New Evidence Shows There’s Still Bias Against Black Natural Hair

Photo: portishead1/Getty Images/iStockphoto

One of the weirdest characteristics of education in our (western) society… is that our approach to education is extraordinarily authoritarian. It is obsessed with compulsion and control. So the child in the modern classroom may not move, speak, sing, laugh, eat, drink, read, write, think their own thoughts, look out the window, or even use the toilet without explicit permission from an authority figure.

In WEIRD (western educated industrialised rich democratic) societies we are so habituated to this appalling lack of personal freedom that it has become functionally invisible to us and in a truly Orwellian twist, many people now consider it a ‘fundamental human right’ to be legally compelled to learn what somebody in authority says they have to learn.

—  Carol Black 
Zero Waste, Veganism, and Privilege

This post has been a long time coming. I’ve had a lot of conversations with friends on this topic lately, and I realize that these important conversations don’t happen very much in our online communities. There are three main things I’d like to address.

1. Environmentalism absolutely must do a better job of reflecting intersectionality.

I’m a member of the activist community at my school and in North Carolina in general. This means that I do everything I can to show up for black lives, trans lives, Muslim lives, native lives and more. I see intersectionality in everything I do and work hard to educate myself as a white, middle class person. I am part of the Divestment Student Network which cannot divorce these environmental issues from the social issues they impact. Environmental racism is real. The same systems of oppression that are creating environmental catastrophe are also hitting queer people, women, and poc the hardest. This cannot, must not, be forgotten. I believe that it is easy to talk about environmental issues in a way that centralizes narratives about landfills, marine life destruction, facts about carbon footprints, and endangered animals. Often times, the human side of things is left out, and those narratives must be just as important. We all suffer as a result of climate change, and certain populations suffer first and most. Our narratives should strive to be more inclusive.

2. The environmentalism movement absolutely must recognize that it takes enormous privilege to be zero waste, vegan, minimalist, etc.

I had a friend point out to me recently that they admired my lifestyle choices, but felt that certain things were exclusive to them because they lived with disability. They had a perspective that I had never considered and really appreciated hearing. I often see people in this community push back against these statements and argue about the ease of “simple swaps” or “lazy veganism” but this just silences and closes out those voices even more. This seriously needs to change. I love figures like the Vegan Bros because they don’t think purity should ever be the goal of veganism. The goal should be drawing people in to this community as much as possible, and listening to the very real challenges and barriers that people face. For example, buying high-quality, long-lasting clothing plainly is not an option for people of low income, and buying second-hand is nothing new or revolutionary when that’s what you’ve always done to get by. This needs to be acknowledged. Most importantly though, shutting down marginalized people when they express their struggles needs to stop, because we should be trying to draw a wider circle to grow as a movement.

3. I come from a place of privilege, which makes it my responsibility to be better and do everything I can to dismantle systems of oppression.

I am white, middle class, able-bodied, neurotypical and educated. I am “woke” to the deep problems in our current food system, and our fashion industry. I have enough financial independence and autonomy to chose to support better products and businesses. I live in a city where I can recycle and compost almost anything, so there’s no reason I should be sending much at all to the landfill. I have a job that allows me to push my university community to do better, and educate others. Because all of this is true, I choose to be vegan, to be zero waste, and to work for environmental and social justice as much as possible. As a friend of mine keeps reminding me “if you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor” (Desmond Tutu). I firmly believe that complacency is a privilege, and I choose to use my privilege for good whenever and wherever I can.

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Obama administration officials filed a brief in support of transgender teen Gavin Grimm

  • On Friday, members of the Obama administration filed an amicus brief in support of Gavin Grimm, the 17-year-old transgender Virginia teenager who will head to the Supreme Court on March 28 to fight for the ability to use the public facilities that match his gender identity.
  • Two former secretaries of education, Arne Duncan and John B. King Jr., signed onto the brief, as well as several officials from the departments of Education, Justice, Labor and Health and Human Services. Read more (3/3/17 3:09 PM)


  You say I’m persistent?

  You’re frakin’ right, I am!

  When it comes to posting stuff about the ignorant, childish, narcissistic criminal in the White House, or defending LGBTQIA/SAGA rights (or human rights overall), or against racism, or fighting for the right (yes, I said RIGHT) to affordable healthcare, or more money for education, or to feed hungry people, or for a few more pennies for the poor instead of additional millions for the wealthy and corporations, like it says above: I can do this all day!

  You call me “Social Justice Warrior,” and “Liberal Cuck,” like they’re insults, but I wear them like badges of honor!

  You’re god damned right, I’m persistent!

“I am insulted that this anime did/didn’t do a thing with race! POC deserve respect! I want them to change it to be more like I want!”

The Japanese have a completely different racial and social history, so it may be that they are making it based on their own experiences. Are you basing this idea on Western ideas of race and racial relations? Wouldn’t making the Japanese make media that reflects a Western idea of race be cultural imperialism? Here’s a good way of knowing if you are informed of Japanese racial politics:

Are you aware that Okinawa was not originally a part of Japan, was conquered, and is often referred to as the Ryukyu Islands? That it has it’s own ethnic minority with its own rapidly-dying language, and Okinawa also has by far the largest concentration of detested American army bases? Here is a photo from the 19th century of a Ryukyu Island native, taken by a Japanese man to sell “ethnic photos” back on the mainland.


Did you know that the “Japanese” we know of are not technically native to the island at all, but arrived sometime in prehistory to displace the original inhabitants? This would be the Ainu, and genetic studies have shown they’re actually more closely related to Caucasians. They now mostly live in Hokkaido, most of their land having been taken and many been killed due to historic wars and slavery.

Did you know that countless ethnic Koreans and Chinese have lived in Japan since the colonial period, often because of having their land ownership and livelihoods forcibly taken and moved to Japan? That they were forced to not speak their native language and had to go by Japanese names? That even though many of them have lived there for generations, they could not obtain citizenship until 1980 without getting a Japanese name? That there were hate crimes committed against Korean schoolgirls as early as the late 1990’s?


And the ultimate taboo, did you know that Japan had its own class of “untouchables” like India? These are known as Burakumin, or at least that’s the nicest word for them. They were often relegated to “unclean” professions like tanning and butchery, and in premodern Japan someone could literally cut down a Burakumin in the street in broad daylight and receive no reprisal.  While they are legally no different from anyone anymore, socially is a different story. If you have Burakumin ancestry, chances are, you live in certain districts–because no one else will rent or sell a house to you. Employers use your address to openly discriminate against you. If you marry, your family may hire someone to trace your family history to make sure you have no Burakumin ancestors. To many, it’s taboo to even discuss them. Below is Jiichiro Matsumoto, a burakumin and considered to be the father of burakumin liberation.

There’s more, of course, but you get the idea. Most people outside of Japan are simply considered gaijin–whether you’re a black gaijin or a white gaijin. You’re a foreigner. Sure, due to imperialism, a Japanese is going to think of a white English-speaker first and there are some differences within the category, but know that this is the category the rest of the world has been placed in. We’re a goofy novelty sure, but there are random gaijin of all colors being the “talento” of Japanese television. Outside of the extreme Japanese right, we’re not very controversial.


As you can see, the Japanese are racial-ideology-wise far from perfect. But for someone to come in with no knowledge of this long and complicated history and insist that having more Hispanic/Black/POC(a meaningless term in a country full of POC) characters in anime, it’s saying that American racial ideas and politics are more important. Sure, I love when anime has diversity of any kind. But if you think an anime with a “POC” is more progressive and ignore something like Samurai Champloo–which has both a Ryukyu island native main character and several episodes devoted to the Ainu–then I’m sorry, but you’re being culturally ignorant and contributing to cultural imperialism. That yet again, the gaijin should be the star. And the West has a very, very long history of imposing its own sense of morality on everyone else. I can find way more foreigners of any color portrayed in anime than any Ainu, let me tell ya. I have no right to tell a foreign industry to stop making media that reflects them and their racial identity and instead make stuff that looks like an American sitcom.


This doesn’t mean let Japan off the hook. But that means that if you want to have your own opinion, if you want to be taken seriously, and if you want to promote social justice without doing the exact same white man’s burden act we’ve always done, then you have a responsibility to educate yourself.