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resolution.

by: ojsama

i love this editor to the ends of the earth please watch this i swear its so beautiful

nikkiwrites68 asked:

I'm new to tumblr and it's great to find a supportive writing community online! Love your blog! I recently began the revision process on my first novel (exciting and daunting). I'm able to recognize scenes that need to be cut, but at times I find myself attached to certain lines or phrases in the portion being deleted. Does this ever happen to you? Do you save those lines and try to work them in later? Any overall tips on revisions? Thanks!

Yes, it happens. I have a “drabbles” document on my computer where I save bits and pieces of writing I’m not using right now but that I know I could potentially use someday. 

I think the best advice I’ve given re: revisions also comes straight from my post on Giving Critique. It’s a pretty good primer on what to look for. The other bit of advice I’d offer is to read and make notes first so you can get an idea of the overall picture, and then edit later. 

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Swan Queen vs. Xena & Gabrielle 20/∞ based on [x]
Once Upon A Time 2x22 & Xena: Warrior Princess 6x21

paracozm asked:

Hi :) I'm losing confidence in my work because I tend to: 1. Repeat words and phrases etc. because I get inspired to write and am wary of pausing 2. Write far too much for one scene Any tips? Editing/phrasing needs work, but how? Thank you!

There are writing aids that can help you with the repetition of words. Just paste your text into it and look at the word density. There’s also a program I love that helps tighten up phrasing: The Hemingway App. This will help you isolate awkward phrasing, run-on sentences, high adverb usage, and passive voice. Both of these are good editing tools you can use after you’ve written a scene. With time, you’ll get better at noticing these issues as you write instead of after.

Another way to practice shortening your scenes is to simply give yourself a topic and a word limit. Give yourself 500 words to write a fight that causes a divorce. Write a climactic reveal of a villain in 200 words, or introduce a character in only 50. If you find each challenge easy to meet, tighten it up by 10%.