edith day

Edith Sampson (1898-1979) was the first black US delegate appointed to the United Nations. She was also an attorney, having completed Law School with a special dean’s commendation, all while working full-time as a social worker.

In 1924 she opened a law office that served the African-American community of Chicago. In 1943 she became a member of the National Association of Women Lawyers, one of the first WOC to do so. She was elected by President Truman to serve on the Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee of the UN in 1950, and 11 years later she became the USA’s first black representative for NATO.

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Bon 14 juillet! Today, the French celebrate 228 years since the Storming of the Bastille, the most famous turn in the French Revolution. Don’t miss the Bastille Day celebration tomorrow at Eastern State with Edith Piaf and Marie Antonette.

And when night comes, and you look back over the day and see how fragmentary everything has been, and how much you planned that has gone undone, and all the reasons you have to be embarrassed and ashamed: just take everything exactly as it is, put it in God’s hands and leave it with Him.
—  Edith Stein was a German-Jewish philosopher who converted to Catholicism and became a Discalced Carmelite nun, taking the name Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, OCD. She was taken from the Echt Carmel on August 2, 1942, and transported by cattle train to the death camp of Auschwitz, the conditions in the box cars being so inhuman that many died or went insane on the four day trip. She died in the gas chambers at Auschwitz on August 9, 1942. She was canonized as a Saint on October 11, 1998, by Pope John Paul II and the Feast of St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross is celebrated on August 9.
Cimmerian

Adjective

[si-meer-ee-uh n] 

1. Classical Mythology. of, relating to, or suggestive of a western people believed to dwell in perpetual darkness.

2. very dark; gloomy:
    deep, Cimmerian caverns.

Origin:
Cimmerian, also spelled Kimmerian, comes from the Latin plural noun Cimmeriī, a borrowing from the Greek plural noun Kimmérioi. In the Odyssey the mythical Cimmerians lived at the edge of Oceanus that surrounds the earth in a city wrapped in mist and fog, where the sun never shines, near the entrance to Hades. The historical, “real” Cimmerians are mentioned in Assyrian sources (Gimirri), the Hebrew Bible (Gomer in Genesis 10:2), and by the Greek historian Herodotus (5th century b.c.). Herodotus says that the Cimmerians were nomads driven south from the steppes of southern Russia by the Scythians through the Caucasus Mountains, turned west, and c676b.c. overthrew the kingdom of Phrygia (in west central Turkey), whose last king was Midas. The connection between myth and history is that there are variant readings for Homer’s Kimmérioi—Cheimérioi, “Wintry People, Stormy people”; and Kerbérioi “Cerberus’s People,” both of which were displaced by the historical Cimmerians. Cimmerian entered English in the 16th century in reference to the nomads, and in the 19th century in reference to the Homeric people.

“The sunny English noon had swallowed him as completely as if he had gone out into Cimmerian night.”
- Edith Wharton, “Afterward,” Tales of Men and Ghosts, 1910

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Edith Head 

1957

Costume sketch for Marlene Dietrich from Witness for the Prosecution

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1951

Costume sketch for Elizabeth Taylor from A Place in the Sun

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1956

Costume sketch for Doris Day from The Man Who Knew Too Much

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1962

Costume sketch for Vera Miles from The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

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1954

Costume sketch for Grace Kelly from The Bridges at Toko-Ri

1954

Costume sketch for Grace Kelly from Rear Window

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Well, I know it’s not “hip” but Edith Piaf’s Mireille Mathieu’s rendition of La Marseillaise is and forever shall remain My Favorite rendition and what better day to share it than on Bastille Day?

That’s a rhetorical question. There is no better day.

Aries: “In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.” ― Albert Camus

Taurus“Snow falling soundlessly in the middle of the night will always fill my heart with sweet clarity”― Novala Takemoto

Gemini: “I leaned out one last time and caught a snowflake on my tongue. They tasted so good, so pure and so divine, like nothing I had ever tasted from the sky.”  ― Shannon A. Thompson 

Cancer: “Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.”
― Edith Sitwell

Leo“The days are getting colder, have a warm heart.”  ― Unknown 

Virgo: “What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.” ― John Steinbeck

Libra“Advice is like snow. The softer it falls, the longer it dwells upon and the deeper in sinks into the mind.”  ― Samuel Taylor Coleridge 

Scorpio: “Winter, a lingering season, is a time to gather golden moments, embark upon a sentimental journey, and enjoy every idle hour.” ― John Boswell

Sagittarius: “People don’t notice whether it’s winter or summer when they’re happy.”  Anton Chekhov 

Capricorn“Love is like the winter, it can be beautiful and peaceful, but also cruel and cold.”  ― Unknown 

Aquarius “I realize there’s something incredibly honest about trees in winter, how they’re experts at letting things go.”― Jeffrey McDaniel

Pisces: “Kindness is like snow - it beautifies everything it covers.” ― Kahlil Gibran

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“Has modern-day cinema ever found itself a more stunning romance actress than Michelle Pfeiffer? Scorsese once called her “the best we have” after seeing her in Dangerous Liaisons, and based on the evidence of Pfeiffer’s dazzling, disgraced, deeply-felt Countess Ellen Olenska in Scorsese’s lush Edith Wharton adaptation, it’s hard not to take him at his word. Grappling wondrously with Daniel Day-Lewis as the betrothed, upper-crust object of her affections, Pfeiffer cuts right to the heart of Wharton’s incisive, nineteenth-century social critique with all the exquisite tension and slow-burning emotion of an intense and impossible love deferred. Just looking at a still of Pfeiffer in this is enough to make you wish that this poignant, perceptive performer still worked at the rate at which we need her, which is always.” — Matthew Eng

THE 10 BEST FEMALE PERFORMANCES IN MARTIN SCORSESE FILMS