edit: washington

Selling a Green Day pit ticket!

Hey everyone! Due to finances I am unable to go to the Green Day concert on August 1 in Auburn, Washington. I bought it when it went on sale in January and paid a total of $120 for it, I am looking for $100, because I have a concert in one week that I need funds for! It is a pit ticket, so you could possibly get one of the best seats at the show! Please reblog this if you can, I need it sold! It would be a physical ticket that I would mail to you, and the money can be given either through like Apple Pay, Snapchat pay or possibly PayPal! Thank you in advance!

FOR THOSE WHO LIVE IN WASHINGTON STATE,

prop. I-1552, a bill restricting trans workplace and academic protections, as well as REQUIRING A TRANS PERSON TO DISCLOSE THEIR ASSIGNED GENDER AT BIRTH BEFORE ENTERING A PUBLIC RESTROOM, is 2/3 OF THE WAY TOWARDS GOING ON THE BALLOT. PLEASE FOR THE LOVE OF CHRIST VOTE MIDTERMS. WE CANNOT ALLOW THIS BULLSHIT IN OUR LEGISLATURE. THIS IS A DISGUSTING AND COMPLETE DISREGARD FOR OUR HUMAN RIGHTS.

5

Charleena Lyles was a “powerful lady” — until she faced Seattle’s flawed criminal justice system

  • Charleena Lyles’ younger brother, Domico Jones, has an endearing nickname for his sister: “String bean Leen.”
  • The 30-year-old mother’s physical build and her documented history of mental illness made the circumstances of her shooting death by Seattle police on Sunday all the more confusing to the family. 
  • How could the officers who killed Lyles see her as a threat after she’d called 911 to report a burglary at her apartment, the family wondered. 
  • The petite and reportedly pregnant woman, whose mental illness was known to Seattle police, experienced homelessness and was a victim of domestic violence during her short life.
  • In Seattle, Lyles’ death puts her at the intersection of several social justice issues. Excessive uses of force by officers, the over-reliance on prisons and jails to deal with women who experience mental health instabilities and a lack of adequate treatment are among the most persistent problems, advocates say. 
  • For nearly five years, Seattle has tried to address some of these issues — the city is under a federal order to retrain its police force and address a pattern of brutality against subjects who exhibit serious psychological distress. 
  • But Lyles’ case suggests these efforts are falling short, as have similar efforts in criminal justice systems around the country. Read more. (6/24/17, 8:41 AM)