edit:janeausten

From Jane Austen’s Emma:

    Emma had no opportunity of speaking to Mr. Knightley    till after supper; but, when they were all in the ball-room    again, her eyes invited him irresistibly to come to her and    be thanked. He was warm in his reprobation of Mr. Elton’s    conduct;    it had been unpardonable rudeness;    and Mrs. Elton’s looks also received the due share of    censure.  

     "They aimed at wounding more than Harriet,“    said he.    "Emma, why is it that they are your enemies?”  

     He looked with smiling penetration; and, on receiving    no answer, added,    "She ought not to be angry with you,    I suspect, whatever he may be. To that surmise, you say    nothing, of course; but confess, Emma, that you did    want him to marry Harriet.“  

     "I did,”    replied Emma,    "and they cannot forgive me.“  

     He shook his head; but there was a smile of indulgence    with it, and he only said,  

     "I shall not scold you. I leave you to your own    reflections.”  

     "Can you trust me with such flatterers? Does my    vain spirit ever tell me I am wrong?“  

     "Not your vain spirit, but your serious spirit. If one    leads you wrong, I am sure the other tells you of it.”  

    “I do own myself to have been completely mistaken    in Mr. Elton. There is a littleness about him which you    discovered, and which I did not: and I was fully convinced                      of his being in love with Harriet. It was through    a series of strange blunders!”  

    “And, in return for your acknowledging so much,    I will do you the justice to say, that you would have chosen for him better than he has chosen for himself.    Harriet Smith has some first-rate qualities, which Mrs. Elton    is totally without. An unpretending, single-minded,   artless girl – infinitely to be preferred by any man of sense    and taste to such a woman as Mrs. Elton. I found Harriet    more conversable than I expected.”  

     Emma was extremely gratified. They were interrupted    by the bustle of Mr. Weston calling on every body to begin    dancing again.  

     "Come Miss Woodhouse, Miss Otway, Miss Fairfax,    what are you all doing? Come Emma, set your companions    the example. Every body is lazy! Every body    is asleep!“  

     "I am ready,”    said Emma,    "whenever I am wanted.“  

     "Whom are you going to dance with?”    asked Mr. Knightley.  

     She hesitated a moment, and then replied,    "With you,    if you will ask me.“  

     "Will you?”    said he, offering his hand.  

    “Indeed I will. You have shown that you can dance,    and you know we are not really so much brother and sister    as to make it at all improper.”  

     "Brother and sister! no, indeed.”

3

|Emma| Emma Woodhouse se describe como “hermosa, lista y rica” pero también es muy curiosa, cuando su institutriz, la señorita Taylor, que era su amiga y confidente, decide casarse Emma queda sola y cree en su propio dilema de casamentera. Esta novela ha tenido tres adaptaciones cinematográficos entre ellas la adaptación tipo comedia romántica, “Clueless” como “ Ni idea” en América latina.

Writing about: complicated relationships

You know maybe I should have just said relationships since they all turn complicated sooner or later. Anyway this overgrown note to myself has three main types of complicated. Hopefully (if you are a writer) you’ll find this useful :)

Lets start with family:

This should be easy, they are a characters first bonds, they share blood, history, characteristics, personality. Raised together, played together, …

In many cases this bond should be strong enough to stand the test of time, but then life happens and lets say it as it is life isn’t always fair.

A good example of this are Thor and Loki (from the Marvel Universe, based on  the Norse gods of the same name). They are raised as brothers and their bond is strong well into adulthood. Their differences only help them it would seem, but that all changes when Loki finds out he is adopted. Well more rescued from being adandoned on a frozen rock. He also discovers he is not an Asgardian but a Jotun. It is then that he starts to dislike Thor’s ease and the fact that he is the heir while Loki himself is an outcast. He lets that fester and when he attacks Thor the older one of the duo does not know where this dislike comes from (he was not told of Loki’s discovery). This is the beginning of one of the best known love-hate relationships between brothers in modern fictional history.

Now on to friendship:

I don’t know who said friends are the family we chose ourselves, it is a lovely sentiment, but wildly optimistic.

At first when you find a good match between characters that is the perfect opportunity to have them bond, but if you want to keep it interesting you have to introduce conflict or you will soon have tooth rotting sugary fluff.

A good example of a complicated friendship is that of Emma and Harriet Smith (Emma by Jane Austen). Emma, who is a bit lost after her governess gets married, meets a girl her age from a poorer background. Now this story is set in the early 19th century so you can’t just be friends with everyone, add to that that there is little choice in a small village. So Harriet is uncomplicated and fun, yet less quickwitted and educated then Emma. This means Emma is in a way at an advantage and she seeks to make Harriets life better by finding her a good husband (a genuine concern if you wanted security in the early 19th century). She however goes a little overboard and soon Harriet is so confused she sets her sights on the man Emma loves and you guessed it things just got difficult. On the one hand Emma can’t blame her, since Harriet does not know how she feels, but on the other it just becomes painfully clear how unequal they are and always have been.

And lastly, romance:

Now much has already been writing about this one, but it is such rewarding topic.

The fact is that when romance and marriage is involved and something goes wrong the feeling of betrayal is much keener which makes for interesting scenes/plotlines.

A good example is the relationship of Cosimo de Medici and Contessina de Bardi in Medici: masters of Florence. They are a real couple and by renaissance Italian standards their marriage was a roaring success. In their 49 years together he only strayed once, which is extremely rare given that he and Contessina’s marriage was an arranged one. He never strayed again and she had influence beyond what could be expected at the time. Which shows that he loved her.

This of course would not have added anything to the story and so they gave Cosimo a failed love affair before he first met his future wife. He wasn’t over it and it clouded his marriage for the coming 20 years. Yet he and his wife are a perfect match and so they have found another as to work to strengthen their family, their bank and the city of Florence. He oddly enough is the last one to notice. Yet from day one there seems to be this pull that brings them together (as seen from the gifs below) and proves they would have been well if he hadn’t had his heart broken first.

This last one is from a TV series, but there is still the element of storytelling present. Which is why I picked this example.