edit shooter

KIP KINKEL’S THERAPY NOTES

January 20, 1997

Kip is a fourteen-year-old boy with brown hair and blue eyes. He was adequately groomed and casually dressed in a green sweatshirt, black corduroy pants and a black leather jacket. He was oriented as to person, place and time with no evidence of delusional thinking or other thought disorder symptoms. His attention and concentration were adequate for interview purposes. His speech was logical, coherent and goal-directed He was initially sullen but became more cooperative as the interview progressed. He became tearful when discussing his relationship with his father. He reported his mother views him as a “good kid with some bad habits” while his father sees him as “a bad kid with bad habits.” He feels his father expects the worst from him and was not supportive of counseling because of the expense and his belief that it will not be helpful. Kip reported he often feels angry but does not know why he feels this emotion. Kip reported he makes explosives from gasoline and other household items and detonates them at a nearby quarry to vent feelings of anger. He denies intent to harm people or property. If he has a “bad day” at school, he feels better after detonating an explosive. I cautioned Kip that gasoline is very dangerous and advised he not use it for such purposes. When asked with whom he can talk about personal issues he identified his friends and, to a lesser degree, his mother. He cannot discuss his feelings with his father for fear he will become angry with him. He feels he has little in common with his parents and finds talking to them difficult. He is receptive to ongoing therapy. Occasionally tearful when discussing his relationship with his father. Kip is very angry and vents this anger by antisocial acting-out and detonating explosives. He is at risk for accidentally harming himself or others with explosives. He is also high risk for continued antisocial behavior. He is angry toward his father whom he regards as very critical of him and has inadequate strategies for venting this anger. A See in one week with a focus on appropriate strategies for managing anger and improving communication between Kip and his parents.

January 27, 1997

Good week. Temper under good control. Bill making a strong effort to be more positive with Kip and they had a good talk yesterday. No further use of explosives or playing with weapons. Feels less angry and is pleased with his father’s efforts. Less angry and less depressed. See in three weeks.

February 26, 1997

Faith reports Kip is doing very well. Kip is feeling less angry and recently achieved a 104% in math class. He met with Dr. Crumbley this morning who assigned thirty-two hours of community service will require he write an apology letter to owner of car he hit with a rock and pay for damage to car ($50.00). No prosecution planned though, if he is arrested within six months, he will be prosecuted for this event and the rock throwing Faith feels Bill is making an effort to be more positive with Kip though he sometimes continues to add a negative comment after praising Kip. Kip predicts he will be able to stay out of trouble in the future. He is not practicing specific techniques for managing anger Suggested he consider riding his bike, running, shooting baskets or tearing old magazines(old phone books or newspapers) when angry.  Good effort by Kip to manage anger. He continues to feel depressed several days per week but denies suicidal ideation.

April 30, 1997

Kip and Faith in. Kip angry and upset about two suspensions in the past week. Last week he was suspended for two days for kicking a peer in the head after this boy has shoved him. Kip is angry that the other boy, who started the altercation, was not punished. Yesterday, Kip was suspended for three days for throwing a pencil at another boy. The teacher, Mr. Boom, saw this as an assault, therefore the three-day suspension. Both Kip and Faith have questions about how these incidents were handled by school personnel. Recommended parents consult with school officials, perhaps  Mr. Nelson, to inform them of how much progress Kip has made and show them the excellent grades and positive teacher comments from this past term. Kip may have overreacted but feels unfairly treated by school officials. It is important he feels supported by his parents and that school personnel acknowledge his improved behavior and performance.

June 02, 1997

Behavior under good control but his mother is concerned he seems too cynical and disinterested in participating in Summer camps. His father continues to make a strong effort to reach-out to Kip and to be positive with him. Discussion with Faith about possible use of antidepressants. She agrees Kip is having ongoing difficulty with depression symptoms and is receptive to considering a trial of an antidepressant. Kip reports, “Eating is like a chore.” He complains that food doesn’t taste good. He often feels bored and in irritable. He feels tired upon awakening most mornings. He reports there is nothing to which he is looking forward. He denies suicidal ideation, intent or plan of action.

June 18, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Dr. Geisler started him on Prozac 20 mg. A.M. twelve days ago. He is sleeping better and there have been no temper outbursts. Kip is taking the Prozac as prescribed and reports no side-effects. His father is making a good effort to spend time with him and Kip is pleased with this change. ASSESSMENT: Kip appears less depressed though it is certainly too early to assess the usefulness of the Prozac. PLAN: See in three weeks.

July 09, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Faith in with Kip. He missed two days of Prozac while camping with friends but is generally taking it as prescribed. She reports he is less irritable and generally in a better mood with no temper outbursts. His energy remains low but he is sleeping well and his appetite is normal. He is getting long well with his parents and his father continues to make efforts to spend time with him. ASSESSMENT: Kip appears less depressed and is generally doing well. PLAN: See in three weeks.

July 30, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Kip continues to do well. He is taking Prozac 20 mg. A.M. daily with no sideeffects. He does not appear depressed and denies depression symptoms. His mother reports his moods have generally been quite good. He recently returned from a family reunion in San Diego and was very well behaved and seemed to have a good time.

murderers fictionnal cast

mass shooters +  who they should be portrayed by in biopic.

niclas gillis as Eric Harris 

jamie campbell-bower as Dylan Klebold 

elle fanning as Brenda Spencer 

yuri pleskun as TJ Lane 

dane dehaan as Dylan Roof 


(this is a personal vision, feel free for suggestions)

I have spent days trying to figure out what I want to say. I have crumpled up dozens of pieces of paper and disregarded even more ideas. I have thought about what I could say that might make people feel just a little bit better. But I have come to the realization that it really doesn’t matter what I say. Because there is nothing I can do to take away any of the pain and destruction I have caused. I absolutely loved my parents and had no reason to kill them. I had no reason to dislike, kill or try to kill anyone at Thurston. I am truly sorry that this has happened. I have gone back in my mind hundreds of times and changed one detail, one small event so this never would have happened. I wish I could. I take full responsibility for my actions. These events have pulled me down into a state of deterioration and self-loathing that I didn’t know existed. I am very sorry for everything I have done, and for what I have become.

-Kip’s Statement to the victim’s