ed sheeran magazine

She would never send new songs, no. I hear them but has to be with her.
I remember when I did a song with her for her album, I was in San Francisco and they sent someone with a locked briefcase with an iPad and one song on it and they flew San Francisco and played the song I’ve done with her and asked if I like it and I was like ‘yeah’ and they took it back, that’s how I hear it.
—  Ed Sheeran for Capricho Magazine about Taylor sending him her new songs
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“So we walked into this huge mansion and we went into the bathroom and as soon as I went into the bathroom I slipped, and just ate it. Just fell. And like not even just a stumble, I was fully on the ground.”

The night Taylor knew Cara was her real friend!

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Ed Sheeran Reveals His Favourite New Tattoos | British GQ

1. “You’re So Vain,” Carly Simon, 1972
It was the shot heard ‘round the world that left everyone debating and wondering, “Which famous ex-lover did she write it about?” I’ve felt the ripples of that blaring public curiosity affect my own lyrics. I was a poetry-obsessed preteen the first time I heard that incredibly gen-ius kiss-off, “You’re so vain, you probably think this song is about you.” After hearing that, it was like a key had just unlocked this forbidden area of storytelling for me. You can say exactly what you feel, even if it’s bitter and brazen! Almost 10 years later, I sat in my dressing room in Boston. Carly Simon had just performed “You’re So Vain” with me in front of 65,000 fans. She leaned over and whispered to me who the song was written about — me, the one person who hadn’t asked her.

2. “This Kiss,” Faith Hill, 1998
I sang this song for my fourth-grade chorus audition. I think it changed the way I saw country music and music in general. Everyone loved “This Kiss,” not just country fans. Pop and rock fans loved it too. I guess you could say that theme rubbed off on me.

3. “Lego House,” Ed Sheeran, 2011
I was so intrigued by this song that I reached out to Ed to write for my album Red. I loved the cadence of the pre-chorus, “And it’s dark in a cold December, but I got you to keep me waa-arm.” We wrote in a Phoenix hotel room, ate In-N-Out burgers and essentially became a permanent fixture in each other’s lives.

4. “Blood Bank,” Bon Iver, 2009
I think this is one of the most beautiful love songs I’ve ever heard, because of the conversational lyrics. It’s so detailed, but in a sporadic way – just like a memory. My favorite lines: “That secret that we know, that we don’t know how to tell/I’m in love with your honor/I’m in love with your cheeks.” It’s dark, but feels romantic. I think I like this song because it reminds me of how love actually feels.

5. “The Middle,” Jimmy Eat World, 2001
I remember listening to this on the bus to school. I felt comforted by it, because I never felt like I really fit perfectly into any clique at school. I wish every kid who goes through those same feelings of loneliness could hear how Jim Adkins sings, “Don’t you worry what they tell themselves when you’re away.”

6. “Hands Down,” Dashboard Confessional, 2003
My high school experience was marked by memories of house-party singalongs of “Hands Down” and driving around with my best friend screaming the words to it. It’s the best recounting of an unforgettable first date I’ve ever heard.

7. “Backseat Freestyle,” Kendrick Lamar, 2012
This past year I moved to New York, and for the first time, I was dealing with dozens of paparazzi outside my place every day. At first, I got really anxious every time I’d be about to open the car door. They’d crowd around me and yell. Then one day I put my iPhone on shuffle, and “Backseat Freestyle” came on. Something about Kendrick’s voice and the beat made me feel safe. It was pretty much all I listened to that summer.

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Elton John talks Ed Sheeran with Rolling Stone Magazine.
  • Rolling Stone: A lot of people don't realize that you work with Ed Sheeran. What's your role in his career?
  • Elton John: I've been advising him, and own the company that manages him. He asks me for advice. For example, a couple of years ago, he told me that the record company wanted a follow up to +, but he was also offered a tour with Taylor Swift, 88 shows in America. He said to me. "What should I do?" I said to him, "It's a no-brainer. You do the 88 shows with Taylor Swift. She'll be on top of the bill. You'll be coming on when people are coming in. It's not your audience. It'll give you so much backbone, and you can't buy that experience. And you know Taylor. You like her. Do that — there's plenty of time for a second record."
  • "He's such a good musician that he will not be satisfied with just playing on his own. And on the new album, x, he didn't want to put "Sing" first. Pharrell has had so much success recently. I'm worried people are going to be burned out by him." I said, "Listen, it's a song that people don't expect from you. If you want to put out 'Don't' first, it's gonna take a while to get up the charts. If you put 'Sing' out first, it will go straight in, and it will be the biggest thing on radio you've had so far." Every record he put out before that, "The A Team" and "Lego House," they took a long time to get up the charts. I think that "The A Team" took a year, and they wouldn't put him on the Grammys. I said to them, "Listen, I'll do a duet with him on 'The A Team.'" That got him on the Grammys because that's what I do. I'm a manager. It was a vital move for him."
  • "But I just give him advice. I've been around for so long and I know the scene. I knew that "Sing" should be the first single, and of course, it worked. He emailed to say, "Thank you so much." He says thank you. He listens. I'm doing it to make sure his career goes the right way. I'm very good at that."
  • RS: It's amazing that he plays stadiums with just an acoustic guitar and no band. I've never seen that done before.
  • EJ: That's unique. I mean, I played Madison Square Garden on my own, but he did Wembley Stadium three nights, which was 85,000 people a night on his own. It's astonishing. It's very brave. But sooner or later, he's gonna have to get some other musicians. He's such a good musician that he will not be satisfied with just playing on his own. I tell him that it's great for a while, but then the novelty wears off. Playing with other musicians will give him a whole new twist, and I think he'll love that, but for the moment he's very happy doing what he does. But putting on my management hat, that has to change soon."