economic-history

I recently saw a video of a young woman talking about all of the reasons our generation, the Millennials, sucks and that’s she’s sorry for what we’ve become. Here is my, a fellow Millennial, response:

You say we’re just ‘existing’ and not ‘contributing anything to society.’ The oldest Millennial is 34, the youngest is 12, we haven’t had time to contribute anything yet. We’re trying to survive in a world that no other generation has had to grow up in, with a tanked economy and most of our childhood hearing nothing but war in the Middle East on the news while also being profoundly connected. We didn’t do that.

You say we’re no longer polite, we don’t say ‘no, sir’ or ‘no ma’am’ anymore and we no longer hold the door open for our elders or women. We also don’t expect low-paid workers to break their backs for us, or at yell at them when they make a mistake, like my 60-year-old grandfather does. We say ‘no problem’ when there’s a mistake in order, and politely stand by while the 40-something-year-old soccer mom huffs and rolls her eyes as the new girl struggles to punch in the correct code.

You say our music objectifies women and glorifies drugs and criminals. There has been no significant change from the songs that were once sung or the singers who sang them. Many of the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s performers were drug addicts, womanizers, and criminals in their own right. Elvis Presley was child abuser, John Lennon raped his many girlfriends and most of the music I grew up listening, which was 80’s rock, were performed by habitual drug abusers. Let’s not pretend like human nature took a drastic turn when 1983 rolled around.

You say we cuss to prove a point. We, as a generation, have learned it’s not the words we fucking use, it’s the passion in them that we care about. As a generation, we’ve become more interested in politics and the world around us, cursing is minor problem when we consider the political climate the older generation has plunged us into.

You say we use ‘bae’ to describe the ones we love. Bae, originally, means ‘before anyone else’ which is incredibly romantic in my opinion. Bae is also hardly ever taken seriously, it’s a jokey way to talk about someone you love. Language changes, I doubt people were happy when we changed ‘wherefore’ into ‘why.’ The greatest injustice we can do to our language and culture is not allow it to evolve and grow with us.

You say we idolize people like Kim Kardashian and shame people like Tim Tebow. Kim Kardashian is a business woman who had a private video she made with a lover illegally revealed. Instead of fading into obscurity, she stood tall and did not let the sexual shaming she endured stop her and now runs a multi-million dollar industry, is married to one of the richest men in the world, and had two beautiful children. Tim Tebow is a Christian who was criticized by a few people for praying in an open stadium while most people just wanted to see a game.

You say we’re lazy and entitled, we want to make a lot of money and get a free education but we’re not willing to put in the work. We are not lazy. I cannot tell you how many people I meet who have gone to school full time while working a part or even full-time job just to make ends meet. We’re not entitled, we’re bitter. In the 70’s, you could work a part time job over the summer and pay your way through four years of school because tuition was $400, now just to walk in the door of your local community college you need to drop $14,000. We have kids who aren’t even old enough to drink, yet are already $20,000 deep in debt. Debt that won’t go away because even filing for bankruptcy won’t erase it. And even with that education, there’s no guarantee you’ll find something in your field. I have a friend who has a degree in microbiology and she’s making $9 an hour selling $15 candles. I have another friend who has a masters in Sport Psychology and Counseling. She’s a bartender. My parents bought a three bedroom house in the suburbs in the late 90’s while my generation is imagining apartments with breezy windows and trying to get enough money to get food while we scrounge up less than $8 a week.

You say we spend more time online making friends and less time building relationships and our relationship’s appearance on Facebook is more important than building the foundation that relationship is based on. We are a generation that is profoundly connected and no other generation has seen this before. We have more opportunities to meet people from all over the world and better chances to understand other worldviews and lifestyles. Being able to stay home and talk to people over the internet is cheaper and more relaxing than having to force yourself to interact with people in public settings after a long day of minimum wage labor. The people I talk to more over the internet are people I have been friends with for years. It’s easier to talk about the day’s events over Skype or Facebook Messenger than arrange a day to meet in person when you have conflicting schedules. I truly don’t believe most people care what others think of their friendship or how their relationships ‘look’ on social media. Most often what you are calling ‘our relationship’s appearance on Facebook’ are documented and searchable memories.

You say our idea of what we believe in is going on Facebook and posting a status on Facebook. Not everyone can join in with the crowds of protesters. It’s easy to see what others have to say through the comments and argue back without the threat of violence. And when this generation does organize events to stand up for ourselves, it’s met with childish name-calling or being reduced to a ‘riot.’

You say we believe the number of follows we have reflects who we are as a person. It’s nice knowing there’s 20 or 50 or maybe even 100 people who care what you have to say or think. We live in an age where we can and will be heard.

You say we don’t respect our elders, that we don’t respect our country. Our elders grew up in one of the greatest economic booms in history and in turn made it the worst economic situation since the 1930’s all while blaming kids who were only five at the time for it. We stand on our flag because it means nothing, it’s a pretty banner for an ugly lie. We’re a country that says you can make it if you just work hard enough while, in the end, that will almost never happen. We’re a country that becomes irate at the idea of 20-something college kids standing on some canvas dyed red, white, and blue but seem to shrug off the millions of homeless, disabled veterans.

You say we’re more divided than ever before. Ever before what? When black folk couldn’t drink from the same fountain as white folk? When women couldn’t vote? When white southerners fought for the idea that they could keep black people as slaves? We’re a generation that is done with injustice and when you fight for social change, you will divide people.

You say everything that was frowned up is celebrated. What does that mean? We frowned up gay marriage. We frowned upon wives being able to say no to sex with their husbands. We frowned up interracial marriage. We frowned up black folk being allowed to go to school with white folk. We frowned upon women being allowed to vote. Are those things not worth celebrating?

You say nothing has value in our generation, that we take advantage of everything. We value friendship more, we value the fists of change, we value social justice and family and the right to marry those we love. We value the right to be yourself, wholly and fully. We value the right to choose and we value the idea of fighting what you believe in, even when everyone older than you is telling you you’re what’s wrong with the country.

You say we have more opportunities to succeed than those before but we don’t ‘appreciate’ them. We are a bitter generation. You can finance a boat for 3.9% but you have to pay back college tuition plus 8.9%. We may have more opportunities but those opportunities cost money we don’t have.

You say you can see why we’re called ‘Generation,’ but we’re not Generation Y, we’re Millennials and we do feel entitled. We were promised a strong economy and inexpensive education. We had the world in our hands and we were going to make it better. And it was ripped away from us because of incompetent rulers, illegal wars, and greedy corporations and we get blamed for it. Crime has gone down, abortion and unintended pregnancy has lowered, people are living longer, people are more educated, people are less likely to die from violent crime or diseases, yet my generation is touted as the worst generation and for what? Crimes that we’re accused of that happened before we could even wipe our own ass? We were raised better, and we were raised in a society that treated, and continues to treat, us like garbage. And we are done. We are not sorry, we did nothing wrong.

2

2/100 Days of Productivity

4.5.16

Today was majorly productive - I’m still a bit behind but I got so much done! The book in the middle “the Cold War” is one I’ve been reading on the train the past few days to try and expand my knowledge for history, but in a more novelised way because I find I take in information from books and textbooks differently. I also managed to finish f my ecologist notes as well as type up some history work and convert them all to pdf’s to print (Never let pdf converting build up - I had over forty files to convert) Also during the day I managed to cram in planning a history source question and a Ecologism question to consolidate some of my knowledge. Late tonight I think I’m going to do some more economics and maybe start writing my history questions and I’m super looking forwards to tomorrow because it’s Starbucks Thursday’s!! :)

Hey, guys!

I don’t know about you, but I personally find audio stimulation incredibly necessary to my study sessions, drives, and whenever I go running. One of the best (free!) resources for this are podcasts. Not only do you get to listen to real people and expand your worldview, but you can learn something as well! I’ve listed a few of my favorites, feel free to add your own!


Planet Money is a fantastic foray into economics, sociology, and special interest for beginners and veterans in those fields alike. The hosts are always humorous and you will always come out of one of these 20-minute episodes understanding the world around you a little more.

Stuff You Should Know feels like How It’s Made for your ears. Even those boring topics you’d never look into a million years are brought to life with these guys!

Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History helped me pass my AP World History exam. He takes the time to explore an incredibly complex era in history with intricate and enticing detail. Coupled with excellent storytelling abilities, you just might be able to cite the succession of the Mongol empire by heart.

TED Radio Hour is a great way to take your TED talks to go. 60 minutes of experts, professors, parents, widows, and so much more of real humans sharing their insights, experiences, and livelihoods with you. What else could you ask for!

Mac Power Users helped me understand that to master your craft, you have to master your tools. Hosts David Sparks and Katie Floyd explore how we can make iPhones, iPads, and Macs work for us and expand our productivity past where it ever could be.

Cortex focuses on the workflows and systems of a popular educational YouTuber, CGP Grey. They talk about email, current events in the tech industry, and how an output-based skillset has to evolve over time. It also brings up the importance of side projects to keep you engaged (Which is what this studyblr is for me!)

College Info Geek is quite possibly the most useful podcast I’ve ever listened to. It’s hosted by Thomas Frank, a college grad who managed to turn his college blog into a very successful small business. He reads hundreds of books on productivity and education and distils them down to bite-size chunks while also taking important questions about college, business, and learning.

Beyond the To-Do List is a podcast that explores the tools that a variety of industry leaders use to remain successful. Each person is unique and brings their own chemistry to the question of how to get your work done with as little resistance as possible.

Serial is a murder mystery. It blew up overnight and brings to light the questions of morality in the criminal justice system. A classic “Whodunit” with a good deal of investigative journalism.

Invisibilia is a podcast for those of you who love psychology and sociology. Through personal epitaphs from around the world, the invisible concepts that shape how we feel and how we see the world are discussed. This podcast gets browny points for being incredibly addictive and informative to boot.

S-Town is unlike anything I’ve ever heard before. It was a heart-wrenching, confusing, absolutely stunning piece of auditory journalism from an unexpected source. Warning: heavy language content and discussion of prejudice.

The Mind Palace is an intensive exploration of the history and art from unconventional and fascinating perspectives. Excellently edited and curated for massive historical enjoyment. Perfect for those of you who love Sherlock references and literary media alike!

That’s all, folks! Happy listening! Let me know what you listen to!

SENDING GOOD VIBES TO ALL OF YOU TAKING AP EXAMS!!

⚗Chemistry ♻️Environmental Science 🛋Psychology 💻Computer Science 🇪🇸Spanish 🎨Art History ⚛️Physics 🖊English 🇯🇵Japanese ⚖️Government and Politics 🇨🇳Chinese 🇩🇪German 🇺🇸US History 🖌Studio Art 🔬Biology 🎼Music Theory 📐Calculus 🇫🇷French 🇮🇹Italian 💱Economics 🌎World History 📈Statistics 🙆Human Geography 🇪🇺European History 📜Latin

Hope you all get 5s! 💯💯💯

terpsikeraunos  asked:

Your Roman history posts are so great! I'm going to ask - why do you like Tiberius?

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT THE EMPEROR TIBERIUS. 

This is going to be long. All the references are off the top of my head (as in, I remembered the Latin phrase so I could ctrl+f to find it) so I haven’t included some but I hope this will do, if there’s anything anyone would really like me to prove then let me know and I’ll find it XD

  • Tiberius did not want to be emperor
  • Tacitus described Tiberius (Annals 1.80) as ‘talented and intelligent, but paralysed by lack of confidence’ (that is a loose translation of a single phrase, based on Tacitus’ overall portrayal)
  • Tiberius was emotionally abused by his family all his life. He spoke slowly, and walked quite strangely, and dressed quite unusually; Suetonius records that Augustus, ‘as if to excuse Tiberius but really to mock him’ said in the senate, ‘They’re not vices of personality, they’re defects he was born with.’ (Suetonius, Tiberius 68)
  • Augustus forced Tiberius to divorce his wife Vipsania, whom he truly loved and who was pregnant with their second child, and marry Augustus’ own daughter Julia to keep things in the family and present a pair of power couples [i.e. Augustus & Livia, Tiberius & Julia] to the gossip-loving Roman people (Velleius, Roman History 2.96; Suetonius, Tiberius 7; Dio, Roman History 54.31; Tacitus, Annals 1.12). Vipsania miscarried their child. When Tiberius next saw her, he broke down in the street and ran after her in hysterics. (I don’t think I can overstate how public emotion, especially public demonstration of love for one’s wife, was Not a Roman Thing to Do.) Augustus had Vipsania married to one of his (Augustus’) aides and took measures to ensure Tiberius never set eyes on her again.
  • Two years after Tiberius’ divorce from Vipsania, Tiberius’ beloved younger brother Drusus was mortally wounded and Tiberius journeyed from Rome to Germany in two days and one night to be at his side when he died, and then walked the body all the way back to Rome. In Lament for Drusus, attributed to Ovid, the speaker describes the funeral at which the people ‘beheld [Tiberius] utterly unlike himself — dazed and sobbing, his face ashen with grief’.
  • Another two years later Augustus tried to make Tiberius his co-ruler. Tiberius suddenly asked to retire to study in Rhodes. Augustus refused. Tiberius attempted suicide (Suetonius, Tiberius 7). (I put this in bold because scholars have spent years arguing over why Tiberius asked to go to Rhodes. I don’t understand what the issue is. Suetonius, for once, spells it out.)
  • Tacitus, Annals 3.56 writes ‘Augustus was confident in power because he knew he was great, and he knew that Tiberius wouldn’t abuse the power of the emperor either, because Tiberius had a low opinion of himself.’
  • When Augustus died, Tiberius, while reading his will in the senate, broke down in the middle of it and said he wished he was dead (Suetonius, Tiberius 23).
  • The senate tried to make Tiberius accept sole power. Tiberius tried to get out of it, begging for help and saying that he lacked the self-confidence and the mental strength, but the senate pretended to think he just wanted their approval. Tacitus says (Annals 1.11), ‘The senate’s greatest fear was that they should seem to understand his meaning.’

So Tiberius did become emperor, and then what? According to the conventional picture of Tiberius (exemplified in I, Claudius), he went off the rails and turned into a bloodthirsty, sexually depraved monster because of all the above trauma. Is that what happened? NO.

  • As soon as he became emperor he immediately abolished Augustus’ private council and insisted that all proposals be taken to the senate. Sallustius Crispus (son of the historian Sallust), who had been Augustus’ legal advisor, had already told Livia ‘not to let Tiberius dismantle the foundations of monarchy by letting the senate decide everything’ (Tacitus, Annals 1.6).
  • He intervened on several occasions to stop an execution ordered by the senate, and when the senate executed someone while he was away, he introduced a statutory ten-day delay between sentencing and execution to allow for appeals.
  • He instituted one of the ONLY sensible financial policies in Rome’s economic history since Mithridates of Pontus fucked up all Rome’s shit in the 80s BC. (I don’t know jack shit about economics but source)
  • He personally remunerated all the victims of any natural disaster that happened during his reign (earthquakes, fires, etc).
  • He dedicated only a few buildings (dedicating buildings was something rich Romans did to assert their power over the populace and make themselves look good) and one was a public museum (which was still quite a new thing) dedicated to marital and family solidarity, on the site where the ancestor of Julia’s chief lover was murdered, inscribed with his own name and the name of his brother who had been dead for 20 years… (Dio 55.27)
  • …but he undertook more building works than the record tells us, because he restored several public buildings but left them in the name of the original dedicator (i.e. he declined to take prestige away from other families).
  • He went out of his way to promote senators of non-traditional backgrounds, even though he was from a privileged family himself (unlike Augustus, who was from an obscure family but promoted people from privileged families)… (Tacitus, Annals 13.21)
  • …and he told senators of traditional backgrounds to fuck off if they spent all their money on parties and expected to get it back from the public treasury just because their family was famous. (Tacitus, Annals 2.38)
  • After his divorce from Julia he never remarried. He supported the careers of the sons that his first wife, Vipsania, had with her new husband (even though the new husband liked to taunt Tiberius about their marriage, which even Tacitus admits was cruel), and when Vipsania died he had her buried in the imperial mausoleum.
  • Despite public insinuations, Tiberius actually had a very good relationship with his heir Germanicus, who was the son of Tiberius’ brother Drusus. Tiberius wrote Greek poems and Germanicus translated them into Latin. Tiberius trained Germanicus as a soldier. When Germanicus died, Tiberius wrote a verse elegy for him and ordered that he be honoured on the same level as the adopted sons of Augustus who had died young also. He didn’t appear in public (which led to the populace saying he had Germanicus murdered…) but he insisted on going to the senate, and the senate published a decree (the SCPP) which basically said that seeing him in such an awful state was embarrassing them.
  • Tiberius fired provincial governors who tried to exploit their subjects or didn’t respect the local customs, and he arranged the administration of the provinces to make life better for the people who lived there (which pissed off the senators back home who thought all non-Romans were second-class citizens). (You can read about how great the provincials thought he was in Philo’s Embassy to Gaius)
  • He refused to engage in offensive wars, and any wars that were going on before Augustus died, he ended them by diplomacy. (I can’t remember where but Tacitus says that Tiberius was very proud of his record for diplomacy)
  • He refused (unlike… oh, every other emperor ever) to be worshipped as a god. He said, ‘No one is allowed to set up a cult in my name unless I give permission. I won’t give it.’ (Dio 57.9) He also said, ‘[I don’t want a temple, that shit is pointless because] only monuments in the heart last forever.’ (*melts*) (Tacitus, Annals 4.38)
  • He said to his (biological) son Drusus, ‘You will never break the laws or commit violence against anybody while I’m alive, and if you try it, you won’t do it when I’m dead, either.’
  • He was constantly subject to extremely cruel insults from his stepdaughter Agrippina (daughter of Julia) who even wrote a pamphlet about how awful he was, but most of the time he just listened to her in silence and then walked away. On one occasion she screamed after him, ‘Who do you think you are? Don’t you know I’m related to the divine Augustus?’ Tiberius said bitterly, ‘Do you think you are wronged because you don’t rule, child?’ (Suetonius, Tiberius 53; Tacitus records this somewhere too)
  • He was offered an ovation (celebratory pageant) when he took a tour of the local area, and he responded, ‘Do you think I need to be congratulated for that? Do you know how many wars I won when I was younger?’ *cracks knuckles*
  • He spoke Greek so well that sometimes he wrote Latin according to Greek grammar rules and once he issued a public apology because he’d accidentally put a Greek word in an official edict because he couldn’t think of the Latin equivalent, and he got a group of senators to consult a bunch of dictionaries to find one (Suetonius, Tiberius 71).
  • He, alone of all the Julio-Claudian emperors, was never accused of using his position to blackmail women into sleeping with him. In fact there is only one credible sexual allegation made against Tiberius: that he enjoyed performing oral sex on women (Suetonius, Tiberius 45 although it’s quite difficult to work out what is meant here, I read it in a book on Roman sexuality).
  • He refused to introduce anti-freedom-of-speech or blasphemy laws; he said ‘insults to the gods are the gods’ concern’ (Tacitus, Annals 1.73; incidentally, he was the emperor during the lifetime of Jesus, who said more or less the same thing).
  • He blocked an attempt by the senate to punish people who accused senators who were later acquitted, in case fear of punishment made real victims too scared to come forward.
  • He refused to let crimes against his family be treated differently from crimes against anyone else, and if anyone tried to prosecute someone for insulting him, he dismissed the case.
  • (He tried to listen to petitions with a blank expression so he remained impartial, but once after a particularly long day, someone tried to prosecute a citizen for putting up a second-hand statue of him, and he suddenly got up and screamed ‘ARE YOU FUCKING SERIOUS’, which scared the shit out of everyone and gave him a reputation as a tyrant) (Tacitus, Annals 1.74)
  • He attended the courts and ‘his presence meant that justice increased but the senators’ prerogatives were restricted’, grumbles Tacitus, a senator (Tac. Ann. 1.75). (If a senator prosecuted someone and won, the senator got that person’s property.)
  • He was bombarded with whiny messages from senators and his response (Tac. Ann. 6.6 and Suet. Tib. 67) started ‘I am surrounded by idiots’ in such elaborate and obscure language that it took 2000 years for anyone to understand what he meant.
  • He stopped public gladiator shows because he disliked gratuitous violence. His idea of a good time was holding dinner parties for his friends (soldiers and Greeks, people that most rich people scorned) and asking them really obscure questions about his favourite books (Suetonius, Tiberius 70).
  • Again when his son Drusus died, Tiberius continued to attend the senate, and the senators tried to make him go home because they were embarrassed, but he said, ‘I just can’t stand to see people crying all the time. I find solace by burying myself in work.’ (Tacitus, Annals 4.8)

I haven’t actually answered the question: why do I like Tiberius? Because he gave up everything he ever wanted so that his talents could be used for the good of Rome. Because he could not stand the abuse of power. Because he used his power to help deserving people of lower birth who could not succeed because they lacked connexions. 

Because he found it hard to get out of bed in the morning and yet he fought and fought and fought to make Rome a better place for ordinary people. He never wallowed in self-pity or made it about himself, he just kept going. He was not comfortable in social situations (the clearest occasion is when someone approached him suddenly and he panicked so badly that he fell over) and on several occasions he had minor breakdowns in public and yet he kept going. On several occasions he tried to tell the senate he wasn’t well enough to rule on his own, and the senate just mocked him and said he was being an attention-seeking hypocrite (e.g. Tacitus, Annals 4.8-9). I just can’t imagine what it must have been like to go through that when everyone in the city was looking at you. He showed immense bravery and dignity in the face of a callous and uncomprehending senate. He was too good for them.

Because he said (repeatedly and in many different ways: see e.g. Tac. Ann. 4.38; Suet. Tib. 59; Velleius 2.115), ‘I don’t care what people think of me as long as I know I’ve done the right thing.’ 

Because he never wanted honour for himself; ‘I ask the gods to give me peace of mind, and when I am gone, I ask my peers to think of me with a smile.’ The latter I can do.

The Invention Of Prices

It used to be that anytime you wanted to buy something, you had to haggle. The store owner and the potential buyer started out at different prices, and through negotiation – or argument – came to agree on a single price. And that single price would be different for each buyer who walked into the store. The Quakers were not fans of this. Since everyone was equal, according to their religious beliefs, it was un-equal to charge different prices. So they invented the price tag. In the mid-1800s in Quaker stores, each item in the store cost exactly the same thing, no matter how rich you were or how good you were at haggling. Revolutionary!

I think the Indian example is the most telling when it comes to British ignorance about Empire, because it was so recent, and because there is simply no conceivable metric by which you could argue that the Empire benefited Indians. It doesn’t matter what facet of life you look at, whether you look at economic history, social history, cultural, whatever. There are literally no facts you can draw on to make the case that British rule was a good thing for the Indian people, and yet… British people generally know nothing about it beyond a vague idea that we might have helped them. 

Ask a British person whether they think Britain did a good job being in charge of India and the most likely reaction is a shrug, perhaps a request for more information…  ‘we were in charge of India’? They might have seen the film Gandhi once, that’s about it.

It’s not taught in schools or discussed at all. It makes me so angry, like yes, fellow Britons - up until 1947 our country was in charge of India, one of the most heavily populated countries in the world, we left it in flames, ravaged by displacement division and death after 200 years of brutal exploitation - and yes, it is not fucking unreasonable to expect you to have an opinion on this!

With so many people from around the world talking about there experiences in school, it can be a little confusing to figure out what it all means. All states have different standards so things can vary a lot, but here’s a general guide to help you figure out what the heck your American friends are talking about.

Read on after the cut to learn more about grade levels, classes, high school, college, and a lot more!

Keep reading

Guys, here’s a fun tip, if you really want to get ahead in your AP classes over the summer (even though I know most of you procrastinate in ridiculous amounts, like me) if you just google the name of your AP class, for example, AP Biology and click the APCentral/Collegeboard link it will take you to the “Professionals” or teachers page and there are course reviews and course guide PDFs on there that basically tell you everything in the course and it’s pretty great. 

I began to study hard about two years ago, when I started my final GCSE year and when I started my studyblr. Since then, I’ve discovered how I like to write my notes and the organisational techniques that work for me. However I’ve always struggled with finding a strategy of how to actually learn information for a test in an effective way. Hopefully by the end of this post you’ll have a few more ideas you can implement so you can see how you will learn over this next academic year!

Ask questions

This is the best way to understand a topic - and you need to understand it before you attempt writing notes on it and then studying it. I know that lots of people don’t like to ask questions during class, so stay behind for a few minutes at the end or email your questions to your teacher. Sometimes them just telling you 1:1 what they said in class can make more sense and once a topic clicks in your head and you understand it, you’ll be able to study it so much more effectively!

Write notes that work for you

This is the first step to understanding a concept! Though it may take a few attempts before you find a way of making notes that works for you (check out my post all about writing notes here), it will help tons in the long run as you can then re-read these multiple times and have them as a clear resource where everything you need to learn is is one place.

Mindmaps

Mindmaps are really useful for visual learners; I made mindmaps and read them so much I memorised them so that in exams you can simply pull up your mindmap to the front of your mind and read from it! Even if that’s not possible for you, this is a great way to actively study as you can try to write out your mindmap without looking at your notes, see how far you get relying on your memory and then you’ll know what you struggle with and need to learn!

Brain dump

Similar to mindmaps above, but done on a broader level, testing yourself is the best way to actively learn a subject! This can be done by a brain dump; once I finish making topic notes, I then make a mind map with only a few prompt words around it. Whenever I come to revise, I get a plain piece of paper, and my prompt words to write down everything I can remember. This is my brain dump of the topic. I then go through my brain dump with my proper notes and use a coloured pen to correct what I wrote down wrong and annotate it with anything I missed out. The act of writing everything down you know, everything you don’t know in a different colour and reading through your notes really gets the information in your head. 

Have others test you verbally

A quicker way to test yourself is to give your notes to a family member or a friend and have them test you on the content. This works in the same way as the brain dump but is quicker as you’re talking the answers, not writing them down. A way you can test yourself when you’re alone is to explain a process or topic to something/someone around you; I use my dogs, a cuddly toy or even just a lamp and explain the concept as clearly as I can to them.

Mind palace

Lots of people use a ‘mind palace’ technique to memorise a process or list of things. This is when you choose an object or room that you know extremely well and assign different parts of it to a step of the process or item on the list to. For example, I could memorise the factors affecting short term aggregate supply and assign them to my alarm clock; so labour costs is the face of the clock, price of raw materials is the ‘hour’ button and levels of tax and subsidies is the ‘minute’ button, etc. I haven’t used this technique myself before as I only discovered it recently, but I fully intend to use it over the next year for my a-levels!

Create acronyms

This is the method that I use for memorising lists and it works similarly to the mind palace technique above. I use these in economics mostly for factors affecting different markets, supply and demand, etc. As well as being extremely useful in the exam itself, they’re great beforehand as they don’t have to make sense and you can have fun creating them and testing yourself on them! So for macroeconomic evaluation points, I use CCCREEMTTT - it sounds a bit like ‘cream tea’ and makes me smile whenever I use it! They are a genuine lifesaver for me!

Use actual tests

After making sure that you know the content using the above methods, using practice papers or textbook questions really is the best way to perfect your exam technique. Mark your own work so you can see the mark scheme and get accustomed to the way in which they mark and what they’re looking for in your answers.

Focus on what you don’t know

It’s easy to summarise all the above points in just a few words; focus on actively studying what you don’t know. It’s all too easy to revise the same first chapter of your textbook each week because you know the content and it makes you feel good to get the answers right, however that isn’t helping your future self as you’re neglecting the topics that you don’t know. 

Try and be true to yourself and really question whether you’re studying in the most efficient way possible (’has reading the textbook for half an hour really helped me to understand this?’). Once you get into the habit of actively studying and finding which of the above methods works for you, you’ll find that you know and understand the topic and enjoy testing yourself and finding what you really know.

Thank you for reading and let me know which tip was your favourite or if there are any others that you’d like me to add! Go to my masterposts page here to see individual posts on how to study history, economics, maths and for GCSEs!

@squorkal I did my best with the boys in your style. I think I made some slight differences to Louie and Huey’s hair. 

I just couldn’t resist giving my son bangs. 

And Louie, I feel, would need to be bribed in order to cut his hair because otherwise he just wouldn’t bother.

Teen Ducks is such a fun idea to work with. And if it’s alright with everyone present I’d like to impart some head canons of mine in regards to the Duck teen years.

Duck anatomy is weird and wonderful. I wanted, here, to put some of the effects of duck puberty on display.

ie: sort of mish-mash the canon “kid” model with the canon adult.

  • So their feet and hands are bigger. This is normal for human teens, and honestly I think it’s flipping adorable.
  • Their necks are longer, like an older ducks, but not quite there yet. Similarly, their tail feathers are starting to sprout properly and their bills are beginning to grow.
  • Their legs and arms are long and gangling. 


Huey:

@robinine-blog​ I don’t know if you recall, but I mentioned a while back that I headcanoned that Huey would actually grow up with a strong body type/build.  

This is because his character is a perfectionist. In his teen years, Huey works hard to eat healthy and stay fit, as a proper scout would.  

And after all, how is one supposed to adventure and solve mysteries to the best of their ability if they aren’t in peak physical condition?

So Huey begins to strive toward that ideal. He packs his own, his brothers and even Webby’s lunches everyday, and gets mad when they don’t eat their lovingly prepared meals in favor of school cafeteria junk. 

He’s one of those early morning joggers. And one day he asks Mrs Beakley politely if he may be permitted to train under her alongside Webby. It’s one of the worst decisions of his life, but he powers through and it starts getting easier.

He’s also something of a semi-model student. I say “semi” because he still gets into a fair bit of trouble, as to be expected from a member of the Duck/McDuck family.

He runs for class president every year but never wins. It’s usually because his brothers and Webby are insistent on helping his campaign.

His best subjects are History, Home Economics and Woodshop.

Don’t talk to him about his “worst” subjects. If he gets a grade below an A he dubs it sub-par. If he gets a grade below B you might think someone had died.

Teachers know not to refuse him a chance at extra credit. ^

Most kids give him a wide berth ever since one substitute did not take into account the aforementioned. ^ 

But some bullies still bother him. His response is typically the cold shoulder, if they’re just trying to annoy him.

Often has to bail Dewey and Louie out of fights.

Once a teacher called Dewey a “hopeless case” right to his face and needed to be taken to the ER with a staple embedded in their nose. Donald bought him a new model airplane when Huey came home on suspension and told him what happened.

Dewey:

Someone get this kid a sandwich.

^ I say because Dewey has all the energy, none of the appetite and all of the metabolic rate. For being sporty, boundless and always ready to start trouble Dewey is actually pretty scrawny in his teen years. Eventually he’ll grow into a similar body type to Scrooge and Donald. 

Underdog Jock. Whether its a football match, dodgeball or even wrestling Dewey is this. Nobody roots for him, but everyone secretly knows he’ll end up winning anyway. Is it pure determination or hidden skill? Probably the former. But whatever drove this kid when he was ten drives him into highschool and beyond. Dewey comes out on top.

He calls himself a serial romantic. He tries.

He’s not in any clubs. He spends his time during recess out on the field, usually playing soccer or challenging people to races. Spends a lot of time with Webby, who accepts every challenge he throws at her.

King of cross country. This kid can run.

His best subjects are PhysEd, Electronics and, surprisingly to most, Home Economics alongside Huey. They make a pretty good team in the kitchen, combining Dewey’s creativity with Huey’s caution with the stove. Dewey has a good nose for spices.

His worst subjects are Languages, English and History. He has no problems with this.

Gets injured often. Very often. He could walk you all the way to the nurses office if you blindfolded him and spun him around on the spot until he fell over from dizziness.

Picks fights with people who give either of his brothers or Webby so much as a stink eye.


Louie:

He’s the guy you go to to get things.

Louie wears his waistcoat instead of his hoodie because the teachers grew suspicious of him hiding things in his sleeves. Occasionally the grouchy PE teacher, who has it out for him, will ask him to turn out his pockets in the hall. Louie turns out his outside pockets.

He has pockets stitched onto the inside of his waistcoat.

He sells the things he hides in his pockets. Candy. Concert Tickets you thought had been sold out. Cheat papers. Information.

Gets everything from threats of a beating to sappy love letters slipped into his locker. He doesn’t pay attention to any of the threatening ones, unless he finds them funny. He usually gives the letters back to his admirers with a lollipop and a soft “no thanks”.

Knows the first names of the lunch ladies and the names of all their pets, children and grandchildren. Gets free food all the time.

Lowkey had a crush on his Spanish teacher.

Spanish is a subject he’s very good at. As well as Language Arts, English and Mathematics.

Has been banned from Home Economics.

Has been banned from all vending machines.

Knows how to get two for the price of one from all vending machines.

He’s getting a little chubby. But running around the world with Scrooge keeps him in shape. PE isn’t his worst subject.

Has a lot of trouble with a lot of kids. People out to get him into trouble. Or out to give him a black eye. Either way, he can handle himself in a brawl if the other guy is the same size or thereabout. But if the guy’s bigger… He’s just lucky the big guys aren’t smart enough to know not to mess with him when his brothers are nearby.

Phew! That was a long one. Sorry, folks. But! That’s all I’ve got so you can be thankful it’s over now.

Thursday, 23/02/2017 (2/100)

Plans for today:

  • finish reading article;
  • rewrite and complete my notes on history of international relations and international economics.

If I have time, I will also start my presentation for international economics buuuuut that’s very unlikely since those two tasks will take some time to finish.

studygram: raquelstudies

“With its rich archaeological and historical record, the Aztec empire provides an intriguing opportunity to understand the dynamics and structure of early states and empires. Rethinking the Aztec  brings together leading scholars from multiple disciplines to thoroughly synthesize and examine the nature of goods and their movements across rural and urban landscapes in Mesoamerica. In so doing, they provide a new way of understanding society and economy in the Aztec empire.”