economic change

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Obama bids his final farewell to the nation from his adopted hometown of Chicago

President Barack Obama bid farewell to the nation on Tuesday in an emotional speech that sought to comfort a country on edge over rapid economic changes, persistent security threats and the election of Donald Trump.

Forceful at times and tearful at others, Obama’s valedictory speech in his hometown of Chicago was a public meditation on the many trials the U.S. faces as Obama takes his exit. For the challenges that are new, Obama offered his vision for how to surmount them, and for the persistent problems he was able to overcome, he offered optimism that others, eventually, will. (AP)

(Photos: Charles Rex Arbogast/AP, Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP, Jonathan Ernst/Reuters, Jonathan Ernst/Reuters, John Gress/Reuters)

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See more images from Obama’s farewell on Yahoo News.

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“She is a wild, tangled forest with temples and treasures concealed within.”
John Mark Green


Katherine used to take Master’s Degree in Applied Economics, but she changed to do Master’s Degree in Literature (she keeps doing it), and she holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration since she was 17.

what a woman.

Hearts must change. If our democracy is to work in this increasingly diverse nation, each one of us must try to heed the advice of one of the great characters in American fiction, Atticus Finch, who said “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”

For blacks and other minorities, it means tying our own struggles for justice to the challenges that a lot of people in this country face – the refugee, the immigrant, the rural poor, the transgender American, and also the middle-aged white man who from the outside may seem like he’s got all the advantages, but who’s seen his world upended by economic, cultural, and technological change.

For white Americans, it means acknowledging that the effects of slavery and Jim Crow didn’t suddenly vanish in the ‘60s; that when minority groups voice discontent, they’re not just engaging in reverse racism or practicing political correctness; that when they wage peaceful protest, they’re not demanding special treatment, but the equal treatment our Founders promised.

For native-born Americans, it means reminding ourselves that the stereotypes about immigrants today were said, almost word for word, about the Irish, Italians, and Poles. America wasn’t weakened by the presence of these newcomers; they embraced this nation’s creed, and it was strengthened.

So regardless of the station we occupy; we have to try harder; to start with the premise that each of our fellow citizens loves this country just as much as we do; that they value hard work and family like we do; that their children are just as curious and hopeful and worthy of love as our own.

—  President Barack Obama, Farewell Address
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READ: “Woman On The Edge Of Time” by Marge Piercy!

#UpToUs #OurRevolution #TwoPaths #BeTheChange

Take action! Your participation MATTERS!!! >>> https://alexaweinstein.tumblr.com/7_Ways

Book summary: “Connie Ramos is a Mexican American woman living on the streets of New York. Once ambitious and proud, she has lost her child, her husband, her dignity—and now they want to take her sanity. After being unjustly committed to a mental institution, Connie is contacted by an envoy from the year 2137, who shows her a time of sexual and racial equality, environmental purity, and unprecedented self-actualization. But Connie also bears witness to another potential outcome: a society of grotesque exploitation in which the barrier between person and commodity has finally been eroded. One will become our world. And Connie herself may strike the decisive blow.”

As with recent policy proposals, it seems as though we are moving towards “a society of grotesque exploitation in which the barrier between person and commodity has finally been eroded.” Don’t let that happen!

'Saving the Planet' vs Saving the Working-Class

See, the liberal discourse about taking action to cut greenhouse gas emissions in the name of ‘saving the planet’ isn’t much more than a moralistic argument without basis in reality. The planet’s going to be just fine. Carbon dioxide levels have fluctuated wildly over the last 4-and-a-half billion years, with various forms of life flourishing for nearly all of its known history. Anthropogenic climate change is actually all about class.

Transitioning to a sustainable society is really about averting a 2 degree global increase in average temperatures above pre-industrial levels - which would result in the desertification of much of the middle latitudes of the planet, the infertility of much of the world’s agricultural land, and the catastrophic mass migration or starvation of a great proportion of much of Earth’s poorest inhabitants. This is unavoidably a class issue - the wealthiest inhabitants of even the most disastrously effected underdeveloped nations in Africa, the Middle East and South East Asia have the means to insulate themselves from the effects of climate change through migration or the creation of enclaves, whilst the toiling masses of subsistence farmers, poor labourers and industrial workers have no such luxury.

When viewed from this point of view, those who deny climate change are not, as liberal political discourse would have it, ‘stupid’ or ‘badly informed’. They are making a deliberate choice conditioned by class allegiance. Those with a vested interest in preserving the carbon-based economy make a cold economic calculation, rooted in the direct logic of capital accumulation: costs sunk into the behemoth industry of the oil economy - from trillions-worth of plant material to the incalculable political infrastructure buttressing dictatorial oil-rich regimes across the globe - must be recouped, locked in place as they are by a labyrinthine network of debt obligations and banking compacts within and between Third World nations and the developed West. It is therefore utterly unsurprising that climate deniers place the profits of a tiny group of oil barons, shadowy shareholders and political stooges above the interests of the vast majority of the working-class people of the world.

All the objectively correct science and liberal moral arguments in the world will not convince climate change deniers to change their positions - since their wealth depends on the contrary. It cannot be overstated: climate change is an economic problem. Climate change is a class problem. It demands economic and political solutions based on the interests of workers across the world.

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Vipin Kumar uses big data to help stakeholders take a global view of the interconnected issues of food, energy, water, and climate change.

I Hate to Say This...

but I’m stunned by the backwardness and barbarism of people.  As those of you who pay any attention to my posts know, I was not a Clinton supporter. I found her to be a deeply flawed, conservative, opportunistic candidate who garnered her nomination because she was the anointed one of the grandees of the Democratic party.  Nasty tricks were pulled to ensure that Sanders, a much superior candidate, was not able to gain the nomination.  Still, I expected people to vote for the boring, lacking in charisma, unprincipled candidate representing politics as usual over the unspeakable demagogue, the racist xenophobe who openly bragged of assaulting women.  Was I ever wrong in that.  People chose to run away from an open, diverse world and to seek shelter in a fantasy of tough guy nationalism and barely hidden white supremacy.  Will they ever be surprised when the only economic change they see will be a worsening of their lives, because those promised jobs are never coming back. The United States has de-industrialized, because the capitalist class knows its profits are increased by exporting its jobs rather than paying unionized workers here a decent wage.  Trump is not going to change that reality.  Neither is he going to change the reality of immigration, both documented and undocumented, although the lives of immigrants, particularly the undocumented, will drastically worsen.  The only thing Trump will change economically will be a massive tax cut for the already filthy rich, to be partially offset by raising taxes on working people.  Under a Trump presidency, with a fully Republican Congress and a once again extremely conservative Supreme Court, everything that most of us value: a clean environment, an open culture, economic and artistic vitality, will suffer.  What we will see is ugliness, and lots of it.  We’re all screwed.

Saving our planet, lifting people out of poverty, advancing economic growth… these are one and the same fight. We must connect the dots between climate change, water scarcity, energy shortages, global health, food security and women’s empowerment. Solutions to one problem must be solutions for all.
—  Ban Ki-moon

Just in case I haven’t made this point before, I’m not really that worried about anything Putin’s Puppet is going to do while in office on a baseline level. If everything goes smoothly, he’ll make some economic changes, dig a few pits we have to climb back out of, Congress will stop his worse decisions, everything will resolve itself.

But that’s not reality.

Reality is terrorist attacks against a man who they know will respond with disproportionate force. Reality is crimes and backlash inflated by the government to force through new measures. Reality is a collapsing economy and angry insistence that more power be given to the President so that he can fix it.

And that is what I’m afraid of. 

  • right-winger: leftist pinkos just want to redistribute the wealth and expand the size of government!!
  • an actual leftist: actually those are short-term solutions proposed only as long as capitalism is a thing. as long as an elite class hierarchically controls the means of production and sources of wealth, higher taxation on the wealthy and more middleman government programs/regulations will be necessary. in the transition from capitalism to socialism, we do favor large-scale wealth redistribution, but from there we want the entire economic framework changed to one involving democratic job complexes and production for human need rather than for the profit of the elite class; at that point, "big government" for the sake of redistribution and regulation will no longer be necessary because the system as a whole would actually be structured to work for the people rather than just mostly elites, and thus egalitarianism and oversight by the people for the people would be written into the economy's genetic makeup.
  • right-winger: leftist pinkos are always trying to take away our guns!!
  • an actual leftist: actually many of us support the inalienable right of self-defense for the oppressed against their oppressors. guns and gun culture are incredibly dangerous when linked with reactionary ideals, which is why we want cops, violent patriarchs, and fascists disarmed. in imperialist white supremacist heteropatriarchal capitalism, the oppressors should relinquish their guns first.
  • right-winger: leftist pinkos don't want people to keep the product of their labor!!
  • an actual leftist: actually we want a system where people are better able to retain the product of their labor; if you work for a boss in a capitalist firm (i.e. most people) the grand majority of your labor product belongs to the boss and you have no say over what happens with it or with production as a whole.
  • right-winger: leftist pinkos hate freedom!!
  • an actual leftist: actually we want more freedom for the average person, in the sense that we want all people to have influence over and access to the things that involve them and the things they need. flat workplace democracy is more conducive to human freedom than vertical workplace autocracy. reduced working hours that arise from automation and democratic production-for-need are more conducive to human freedom than long hours of exploited labor for the benefit of capitalists.
  • right-winger: .....
  • right-winger: .....
  • right-winger: i'm gonna pretend i didn't hear any of that.

Gabriel Bell
Born: April 24, 1987
Died: September 3, 2024

Known as the father of Earth’s post-modern reformism, Bell galvanized the people and government of the United States of America when he led an uprising in San Francisco’s Sanctuary District “A.” Besides arranging for food and medical supplies for the hostages, Bell was able to establish a wide broadcast data link through the planetary communication system, “Interface.” Through this broadcast, he was able bring an unavoidable awareness of the ineffective and cruel nature of the time’s Sanctuary Districts to a wide audience. This helped create public outcry for massive reform to the mental health and criminal justice systems as well as widespread economic change. The American political climate eventually shifted towards justice and equality, and away from the climate of inequality and ignorance. Although Bell was killed during the uprising, he is known as a figurehead for the movement and change it spawned, and the uprising has since been known as the Bell Riots.

Going forward, we must uphold laws against discrimination – in hiring, in housing, in education and the criminal justice system.  That’s what our Constitution and highest ideals require.  But laws alone won’t be enough.  Hearts must change.  If our democracy is to work in this increasingly diverse nation, each one of us must try to heed the advice of one of the great characters in American fiction, Atticus Finch, who said “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”


For blacks and other minorities, it means tying our own struggles for justice to the challenges that a lot of people in this country face – the refugee, the immigrant, the rural poor, the transgender American, and also the middle-aged white man who from the outside may seem like he’s got all the advantages, but who’s seen his world upended by economic, cultural, and technological change.


For white Americans, it means acknowledging that the effects of slavery and Jim Crow didn’t suddenly vanish in the ‘60s; that when minority groups voice discontent, they’re not just engaging in reverse racism or practicing political correctness; that when they wage peaceful protest, they’re not demanding special treatment, but the equal treatment our Founders promised.


For native-born Americans, it means reminding ourselves that the stereotypes about immigrants today were said, almost word for word, about the Irish, Italians, and Poles.  America wasn’t weakened by the presence of these newcomers; they embraced this nation’s creed, and it was strengthened.


So regardless of the station we occupy; we have to try harder; to start with the premise that each of our fellow citizens loves this country just as much as we do; that they value hard work and family like we do; that their children are just as curious and hopeful and worthy of love as our own.

—  President Barack Obama’s Farewell Address
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WASHINGTON, DC — In this week’s address, the President laid out the importance of serving as good stewards of the environment and maintaining the planet for generations to come.  Since taking office the President has prioritized protecting the places that make America special.

He has repeatedly said that no challenge poses a greater threat to our future than a changing climate, which is why he’s taken bold actions at home and encouraged historic action abroad on the issue.

In his address, he encouraged Congress to reauthorize and fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund which has protected more than 5 million acres of land for more than half a century, without costing taxpayers a dime.  Republicans in Congress let the fund expire despite strong bipartisan support. And he reminded us that we all have to do our part to address climate change, promote clean energy and energy efficiency, and ensure a cleaner, more stable environment for future generations.

Noting dozens of large companies have joined Obama on several environmental initiatives. 

We see a regulation when we don’t endorse the moral values behind it. The nineteenth-century high-tariff restriction on free trade by the US federal government outraged slave-owners, who at the same time saw nothing wrong with trading people in a free market. To those who believed that people can be owned, banning trade in slaves was objectionable in the same way as restricting trade in manufactured goods
—  Ha-Joon Chang, 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism 
Obama bids his final farewell to the nation from his adopted hometown of Chicago

President Barack Obama bid farewell to the nation on Tuesday in an emotional speech that sought to comfort a country on edge over rapid economic changes, persistent security threats and the election of Donald Trump.

Forceful at times and tearful at others, Obama’s valedictory speech in his hometown of Chicago was a public meditation on the many trials the U.S. faces as Obama takes his exit. For the challenges that are new, Obama offered his vision for how to surmount them, and for the persistent problems he was able to overcome, he offered optimism that others, eventually, will. (AP)

Here’s a look.

See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr.

 

President Barack Obama is joined onstage by Vice President Joe Biden after his farewell address in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. January 10, 2017. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama on stage with first lady Michelle Obama, daughter Malia, Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden after his farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama hugs his wife Michelle as Vice-President Joe Biden and his wife Jill look on after the President delivered a farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. January 10, 2017.(John Gress/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama greets people in the audience after his farewell address in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. January 10, 2017. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama waves as he is joined by First Lady Michelle Obama and daughter Malia Obama after giving his presidential farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama points as he is joined by First Lady Michelle Obama and his daughter Malia Obama after giving his presidential farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

First lady Michelle Obama hugs President Barack Obama after his farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama wipes his tears as he speaks at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, giving his presidential farewell address. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

First lady Michelle Obama and her daughter Malia embrace as President Barack Obama praises them during his farewell address in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. January 10, 2017. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama wipes away tears while speaking during his farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama staves off tears as he delivers his farewell address in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. January 10, 2017. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama speaks at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, giving his presidential farewell address. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Vice President Joe Biden (L-R), his wife Jill Biden, first lady Michelle Obama and her daughter Malia Obama stand for the national anthem before President Barack Obama delivers his farewell address in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. January 10, 2017. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama speaks during his farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama acknowledges the crowd as he arrives to deliver his farewell address in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., January 10, 2017. (John Gress/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama walk off Air Force One after arriving at O’Hare International Airport Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

President Barack Obama arrives aboard Air Force One at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. January 10, 2017. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Air Force One arrives at O’Hare International Airport Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Honestly the main thing i dislike about MLM practice is the sole reliance on the one party for political, social, and economic change.

Plus absolutism and leader worship is really unattractive to me

I still find the school of thought respectable in its own rights – enough to incorporate some philosophical and practical bits into my own since i see all strains of leftist thought as a multitude of genuine theories where some are better or more useful than others…

but yeah just bc i respect ya dont mean im head over heals for ya.