Eating disorders are so irritating because one day you could be laughing, eating a pint of ice cream and 7 pieces of pizza with your friends, thinking you’re completely recovered and then the next you could be crying in the bathroom wanting to purge because you ate a salad for dinner. 

AKA saying things like “WHAT is going on with you!?” or “you ate that last week with no problem at all!” to someone who is affected by an eating disorder will not do any good. If you’re confused about their actions… imagine what it’s like to be the one feeling like they’re less than everyone else because of how back and forth they feel. Living with an eating disorder is already stressful enough, and pointing out the unsteadiness makes it all the more overwhelming. 

Moving forward doesn’t mean forgetting the past. It means learning from it. More at @coutureandcaffeine

Tips for when you feel guilty about eating:

1.Try to figure out what is making you feel guilty. Targeting the issue is the first step in addressing it. What did you eat that caused you to feel this guilt?

2. One you figured out what food caused you to feel this guilt ask yourself why…was it high in calories? High in sugar? Something that you don’t consider healthy?

3. Look at the long term. What you ate might have been unhealthy or not what you planned, but is it going to affect you in a week? Most of the time the answer is going to be no.

4. Did you genuinely enjoy what you ate? No, I’m not asking about the nutritional value or the macros or the calories, I’m asking if you enjoyed this food. Most of the time the answer is going to be yes.

5. Remember that there is more to life than tracking calories and losing weight or becoming fit. You live one life and in that life there is no shame in enjoying delicious foods. There is nothing wrong in eating something just to enjoy it. 

6. Try your best to distance the relationship you have created between food and guilt. While this is a long term goal, it is something you can work on everyday. There are no bad foods, and there are no good foods. Food is simply food and detaching foods from the labels of good and bad is key to reestablishing a healthy relationship with food. 

It’s amazing what a 20 pound difference can make both physically and mentally. I’ve found that the key to losing weight and keeping it off is to just take my time. I would always pack back on the weight after crash diets…but these past couple of years have been so different. There’s no need for those diets anymore, I’m simply working on finding a balance.

Some days I feel so hollow I swear you could scoop out the contents of my chest and I wouldn’t feel a thing. I walk weightless; a feat possible only after the conviction you’ve become nothing. So many believe a mental disorder hurts the mind, but it’s the mind that hurts me. How is something so futile so cruel?
—  Numb // A.S

FIRST STEP IN RECOVERY IS TELLING YOURSELF THIS!