easy cooking

snowbell55  asked:

Thanks so much! I really appreciate it (especially the College Student's Cookbook), but I'm not so much looking for recipes as I am the processes and what things do, ie, how to cut up a chicken into pieces, what paprika does, how to fry things, which knife to use when you want to do "x", the difference between sauteing and frying, etc. Not so much "what to put together if you want to make X" but "if you do this then this will happen because of that". Do you have any resources for that?

Whoops, sorry I didn’t understand. I don’t have any resources for that, so I threw one together for you! My boyfriend has been a line cook for about seven years now, and he’s taught me so much about food. There are lots of simple things you can do to make food taste better- but let’s start with the basics.

College Cooking 101

Materials

Here is a list of materials that I believe are absolutely necessary to creating a quality product. Feel free to substitute anything based on your own personal preferences.

Cooking supplies:

  • Non-stick frying pan (cast iron pans are much more difficult to clean)
  • Pot (I would recommend a small pot that you can use to cook for just yourself, and a larger pot for cooking portions or for company)
  • Lid for said pot
  • Rubber spatula (much better than wooden spoons)
  • Tongs
  • Sheet tray
  • Strainer
  • Scissors (kitchen scissors)
  • A cutting board (I recommend plastic because they’re easier to wash)
  • Cutting knife
  • Bread knife (both knives should be sharpened every six months at least, you can take them to your local kitchen supplies shop)

Spices:

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Dried chives (or real chives if you can swing them. Throw them in your ramen, your tuna salad, sprinkle them on top of pasta, etc)
  • Thyme (dried or fresh… dried is 3x as potent, use to season soups or pastas)
  • Rosemary (dried or fresh, use to season meats and starches)
  • Cumin (use this spice to rub meat)
  • Cinnamon
  • Sugar
  • Garlic powder or onion powder (used for meat rubs and seasoning soups or sauces)
  • Paprika (I would recommend avoiding smoked paprika, it’s got a super aggressive flavor… use this in small amounts sprinkled over things like you would the chives)

Basic produce:

  • Parmesan cheese (for sprinkling over pastas, you can get it pre-grated)
  • Cheddar cheese (for making sandwiches and mac and cheese)
  • Tomatoes (whole, crushed, paste, whatever… just have some sort of tomato product in your pantry at all times)
  • Potatoes (you can’t buy them pre-cut because the oxidize and turn gray if not used immediately… you can still eat them, but they don’t look pretty)
  • Onions (you can get them pre-cut)
  • Garlic (use to make sauce or soup bases)
  • Romaine hearts (lettuce has a short shelf life, but romaine hearts literally last forever and are healthier than eating iceberg lettuce)
  • Protein of some sort (whatever you like- steak, chicken, tofu, etc)
  • Something salty (like pickles, black olives, anchovies, etc)
  • Your favorite veggies (I like carrots and squashes the best)
  • Pasta (whatever is cheapest or on sale at your store)
  • Bread (freeze half a loaf and leave the rest in your fridge)
  • Eggs (egg beaters or whole eggs, whatever you like)
  • Butter (or a butter substitute)
  • Oil (olive oil is the most expensive)
  • Chicken stock (or vegetable stock, in a carton or cubed)


Techniques

Basic (super duper duper basic) instructions on how to cook various items. I am not a trained professional- the information I’m providing is based off of personal experience only.

Meat

  • Steak (skirt steak or cube steak are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside of the steak should be grey. The inside should be light pink.
    • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want.
    • Pair with: Starches or veggies.
  • Chicken (skinless and precut are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside should be white and dry.
    • Seasoning: Salt and pepper work best. You can also coat chicken in panko bread crumbs.
    • Pair with: Starches, veggies, fruits, or pasta.
  • Pork (pork chops are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with butter or oil. Outside should be starting to crisp. Inside should be the same color as the outside, and should feel very dry and hard.
    • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want. Meat should be completely coated in the spice rub, or it won’t taste like anything but the oil.
    • Pair with: Starches, veggies, or fruits.

Starches

  • Potatoes (little potatoes are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside fork tender.
    • Seasoning: Rub (literally rub the potatoes with your hands) salt, pepper, oil and rosemary all over the potatoes.
  • Pasta (shapes are easiest)
    • Cooking: Boil water with a teaspoon of salt. Wait until the water is visibly boiling to add your pasta. I like my pasta al dente, so I always cook it for the shortest amount of time listed on the box.
    • Seasoning: Thoroughly coat pasta with whatever sauce you’re using, or it will taste dry. Good prepared sauce brands: Newman’s Own, Classico, and Barilla.
  • Orzo/Cous Cous/Pastina
    • Cooking: Cook in chicken or vegetable stock following package instructions. Stir every so often, and add additional stock as it is absorbed into the pasta.
    • Seasoning: I like to add dried herbs to the sauce as it reduces to add flavor. You can also add veggies early on and let them cook in the sauce.

Veggies

  • Carrots/parsnips/beets (chopped are easiest)
    • Cooking: These can be pan fried in oil, boiled, cooked in a sauce/stew, or put on a sheet tray to roast in the oven. The easiest way to cook them is to add them to a sauce that you are heating up, and allow them to soften until they can be pierced by a fork.
    • Seasoning: Rub the veggies with salt before cooking, unless you are adding them to a sauce or stew.
  • Green beans/asparagus/brussels sprouts
    • Cooking: These are best pan fried with butter. Cook them until they are slightly crisped and fork tender. If you want to be fancy you can blanch them before hand. How to blanch: Boil water, and throw the veggies in for literally thirty seconds. Pour them into a strainer and douse them immediately with cold water from your sink tap until they are cool to the touch.
    • Seasoning: Salt works best before cooking. Butter after cooking.
  • Squash/eggplant/sweet potato (chopped are easiest)
    • Yes I know that sweet potato is a starch, but it fits better here.
    • Cooking: These veggies are best roasted until fork tender. Time varies. These veggies should be cooked with their skin left on.
    • Seasoning: Rub these veggies with salt and cook in a little oil. Top with butter after they are cooked.


Resources

- My Pasta Sauce Post. Click here.

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)


I hope this helps!

3

Easy vegan Mediterranean Pasta

Ingredients:

  • 1 small onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 small can off chickpeas (Use the leftovers from my pancake recipe ;) )
  • 200 g dry linguine pasta
  • ½ cup of black olives
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1 Tomato 
  • 1 small zucchini
  • 1 tsp chili flakes
  • 1 tsp sweet paprika
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ cup veggie stock
  • salt and pepper or taste
  • pinch of sugar
  •  some fresh parsley to garnish


Directions

  1. Heat a pot with water, salt it and let it come to a boil.
  2. In the meantime halve the olives, dice the tomato, dice the zucchini and finely mince the onions and the garlic. Then heat the oil in a large pan and add the chickpeas, olives and the zucchini and fry for about 3 minutes on medium high. When the water starts boiling add your pasta.
  3. After that add the onion and the garlic to the pan and cook for another 2-3 minutes until onions become translucent on medium heat. Now add the tomato, the seasonings and the veggie stock and cook for 5 minutes letting it all simmer a bit. 
  4. Drain the pasta and immediately toss with the ingredients in your pan. Make sure you coat your pasta with your ingredients well. 
  5. Now serve to yourself or share with others and enjoy this filling and delicious meal. 
4

This is my go-to food to make when we have surprise guests over at the house and have to come up with something quick and delicious that everyone would enjoy. If you don’t have chicken, any other meat including pork, beef or sausages would do just fine. You can also go vegetarian by omitting the meat and adding more vegetables such as sweet potatoes, eggplants and mushrooms, too. There are dozens of different brands of these curry mixes from Japan and Korea. Any brand you can find at the grocery store works with this recipe, some might be sweeter or spicier than others. My favorite part of this dish is the potato, how it gets soft and it deliciously thickens the curry sauce. It’s one of my comfort food growing up.

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for using seasonings when cooking? Or tips to help cook in general for some one new to it.

College Cooking 101

Materials

Here is a list of materials that I believe are absolutely necessary to creating a quality product. Feel free to substitute anything based on your own personal preferences.

Cooking supplies:

  • Non-stick frying pan (cast iron pans are much more difficult to clean)
  • Pot (I would recommend a small pot that you can use to cook for just yourself, and a larger pot for cooking portions or for company)
  • Lid for said pot
  • Rubber spatula (much better than wooden spoons)
  • Tongs
  • Sheet tray
  • Strainer
  • Scissors (kitchen scissors)
  • A cutting board (I recommend plastic because they’re easier to wash)
  • Cutting knife
  • Bread knife (both knives should be sharpened every six months at least, you can take them to your local kitchen supplies shop)

Spices:

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Dried chives (or real chives if you can swing them. Throw them in your ramen, your tuna salad, sprinkle them on top of pasta, etc)
  • Thyme (dried or fresh… dried is 3x as potent, use to season soups or pastas)
  • Rosemary (dried or fresh, use to season meats and starches)
  • Cumin (use this spice to rub meat)
  • Cinnamon
  • Sugar
  • Garlic powder or onion powder (used for meat rubs and seasoning soups or sauces)
  • Paprika (I would recommend avoiding smoked paprika, it’s got a super aggressive flavor… use this in small amounts sprinkled over things like you would the chives)

Basic produce:

  • Parmesan cheese (for sprinkling over pastas, you can get it pre-grated)
  • Cheddar cheese (for making sandwiches and mac and cheese)
  • Tomatoes (whole, crushed, paste, whatever… just have some sort of tomato product in your pantry at all times)
  • Potatoes (you can’t buy them pre-cut because the oxidize and turn gray if not used immediately… you can still eat them, but they don’t look pretty)
  • Onions (you can get them pre-cut)
  • Garlic (use to make sauce or soup bases)
  • Romaine hearts (lettuce has a short shelf life, but romaine hearts literally last forever and are healthier than eating iceberg lettuce)
  • Protein of some sort (whatever you like- steak, chicken, tofu, etc)
  • Something salty (like pickles, black olives, anchovies, etc)
  • Your favorite veggies (I like carrots and squashes the best)
  • Pasta (whatever is cheapest or on sale at your store)
  • Bread (freeze half a loaf and leave the rest in your fridge)
  • Eggs (egg beaters or whole eggs, whatever you like)
  • Butter (or a butter substitute)
  • Oil (olive oil is the most expensive)
  • Chicken stock (or vegetable stock, in a carton or cubed)

Techniques

Basic (super duper duper basic) instructions on how to cook various items. I am not a trained professional- the information I’m providing is based off of personal experience only.

Meat

  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside of the steak should be grey. The inside should be light pink.
  • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want.
  • Pair with: Starches or veggies.
  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside should be white and dry.
  • Seasoning: Salt and pepper work best. You can also coat chicken in panko bread crumbs.
  • Pair with: Starches, veggies, fruits, or pasta.
  • Cooking: Cook with butter or oil. Outside should be starting to crisp. Inside should be the same color as the outside, and should feel very dry and hard.
  • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want. Meat should be completely coated in the spice rub, or it won’t taste like anything but the oil.
  • Pair with: Starches, veggies, or fruits.

Starches

  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside fork tender.
  • Seasoning: Rub (literally rub the potatoes with your hands) salt, pepper, oil and rosemary all over the potatoes.
  • Cooking: Boil water with a teaspoon of salt. Wait until the water is visibly boiling to add your pasta. I like my pasta al dente, so I always cook it for the shortest amount of time listed on the box.
  • Seasoning: Thoroughly coat pasta with whatever sauce you’re using, or it will taste dry. Good prepared sauce brands: Newman’s Own, Classico, and Barilla.
  • Cooking: Cook in chicken or vegetable stock following package instructions. Stir every so often, and add additional stock as it is absorbed into the pasta.
  • Seasoning: I like to add dried herbs to the sauce as it reduces to add flavor. You can also add veggies early on and let them cook in the sauce.

Veggies

  • Cooking: These can be pan fried in oil, boiled, cooked in a sauce/stew, or put on a sheet tray to roast in the oven. The easiest way to cook them is to add them to a sauce that you are heating up, and allow them to soften until they can be pierced by a fork.
  • Seasoning: Rub the veggies with salt before cooking, unless you are adding them to a sauce or stew.
  • Cooking: These are best pan fried with butter. Cook them until they are slightly crisped and fork tender. If you want to be fancy you can blanch them before hand. How to blanch: Boil water, and throw the veggies in for literally thirty seconds. Pour them into a strainer and douse them immediately with cold water from your sink tap until they are cool to the touch.
  • Seasoning: Salt works best before cooking. Butter after cooking.
  • Yes I know that sweet potato is a starch, but it fits better here.
  • Cooking: These veggies are best roasted until fork tender. Time varies. These veggies should be cooked with their skin left on.
  • Seasoning: Rub these veggies with salt and cook in a little oil. Top with butter after they are cooked.

Resources

- My Pasta Sauce Post. Click here.

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)

I hope this helps!

Paarthurnax snacks

 Note: this recipe is inspired by but does not appear in the Elder Scrolls

Drem yol lok, fahdon! Greetings, friends! At one of my cooking classes recently, a young mother asked me if I had any suggestions for a simple, healthy snack for young children. As I know nothing about children, I had to think long and hard about this. What do they even like to eat in the first place? Thinking far back to my childhood, where snacks were a rarity as we were poor, I recalled the cheese biscuits my mother and I used to occasionally make together when I was a toddler (which is probably what led to my lifelong love of cooking). These savoury biscuits are delicious and crunchy, and incredibly easy to make for or with your kids! I decided to go with the name ‘Paarthurnax snacks’ after my dragon friend at the Throat of the World, as it seems every child these days wants to be the Dragonborn, and the shape will definitely keep them entertained!

But grownups, never fear! Make some for yourself by adding some herbs, sea salt and cracked black pepper, or even a pinch of chili powder to them for a bit of a kick. They also make a great homemade gift when placed in a nice tin that will make your friends and family say “For me? Thanks!“ (Or as we say in Dovahzul, Fah zu'u? Kogaan!)

You will need:
100g whole wheat flour (or plain flour if you prefer), plus extra for dusting
180g cheddar cheese or other hard cheese (mild or strong depending on preference), grated
100g butter, cold and cubed, plus extra for greasing
1 egg yolk
Rolling pin
Dragon-shaped cookie cutters

Method:
In a mixing bowl, combine the flour, cheese, egg yolk, and butter. Add your extra condiments if desired. Knead until smooth, cover in cling wrap, and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Preheat your oven to 180C/355F. Grease a baking tray well with butter, and dust a clean surface well with flour.

When the dough has solidified, roll it out flat until it is about an inch thick and use the cookie cutters to shape your biscuits. Space them finger-width apart on the baking tray and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from the oven and cool on a rack for 30 minutes before eating. Biscuits can be kept for 1 week in a sealed airtight container.

Zelda Fruit Cake


Yields two 8-inch cakes

The things you’ll need

Ingredients
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 6 egg whites
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ½ cup water
  • ½ cup oil
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon almond extract
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, oranges, limes, and honeydew melon for decoration
Equipment
  • 2 large mixing bowls
  • Medium mixing bowl
  • Hand mixer
  • Rubber spatula
  • Two 8-inch cake pans, sprayed and lined
  • Two 8-inch cake boards
  • Offset spatula
  • Cutting board & knife
  • Sweetened whipped cream in a decorating bag with tip cut off
  • Sweetened whipped cream in a decorating bag fitted with #824 tip

Let’s get started!

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, 1 cup sugar, water, oil, vanilla extract, and almond extract.
  3. In a large bowl, mix together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  4. In another large bowl, beat egg whites until frothy and then slowly add ¼ cup sugar while beating. Once combined, turn beater to high and beat until stiff peaks form.
  5. Mix the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and then fold in egg whites in three parts.
  6. Pour the batter into cake pans and bake for 35 minutes.
  7. Once cool, level cakes to 1-inch thick.

Let’s get started!

  1. Cut strawberries into 4 equal slices and shingle them onto the top of the cut cake in circles. Pipe whipped cream between the strawberries.
  2. Place the second cake on top, cut side down, and then frost the entire cake in whipped cream. Refrigerate for 1 hour.
  3. Cut cakes into 6 slices and decorate cake with 3 rosettes on the edge of the slice. Decorate the top with fruit.
  4. Dah-na-na-na-naaaah! You received the Fruit Cake from Breath of the Wild!

Tomato Sauce

There is nothing that I love more than a bowl of pasta with tomato sauce. Tomato sauce is inexpensive, versatile, and so easy to make. You can literally let it stew for hours unattended while you do your thing. I am known amongst my friends and family as the tomato sauce queen. Here are some of my tips and also some of my favorite recipes. 🍅 

Thick Tomato Sauce 

The only way to make thick tomato sauce is to use canned tomatoes. Fresh tomatoes create a thinner sauce. Trust me. Don’t believe the haters who say that a complex sauce can’t be created in a half hour. They are liars! Thick tomato sauce is great for anything from ravioli to shells. It’s also better for weird pasta shapes (like wheels) than thin pasta, because it coats better. 

1. Pricing. There are different qualities of canned tomatoes, different brands costing anywhere from 89 cents to $6.00. You can taste a slight difference with the tomatoes themselves, but not enough to warrant dropping lots of money. I recommend just going to your local Dollar Store and buying bulk cans of whatever is cheapest. One 12 oz can of tomatoes makes two meals for me.

2. Canned variety. Sometimes I like to buy “fire roasted tomatoes” or “herbed tomatoes” to mix it up. Even with the stronger varieties, any initial taste they have will be mostly covered up by whatever you put in the sauce. Remember: fresh herbs are always better than dried ones! 

3. Building your sauce. If you’re going to put anything that needs cooking in your sauce (NOT meat, but any garlic, onions, mushrooms, carrots) cook these in a sauce pan first. Use oil, not butter. Add any dried herbs or spices you want to this initial mix. 

4. Get going. Add your tomato sauce to the pan and get it bubbling. Now is the time to add anything that doesn’t need cooking (olives, capers, anchovies, pickled anything). I like to use brines in my sauces, so I add them at this point. For example, if I’m making a puttanesca sauce, I’ll add my black olives and pour the black olive juice right into my pan. 

5. Taste it. Take a spoonful and taste it. If you don’t like it’s taste, add some more spices. If it’s too acidic, add tomato paste. At this point you can either turn it on low and let it cook for an hour, which creates a very rich and thick sauce. Or, you can cook some meat or veggies and add your fresh herbs. Always ad your fresh herbs in right before you’re about to eat! Otherwise they’ll wilt and you won’t taste their flavor. 

Some easy thick sauces:

  • Puttanesca: From Series of Unfortunate events (and also Italy). Cook garlic and onions first. Don’t let them brown too much, just get them not raw. Add your canned tomatoes, let the sauce sizzle while adding salt and pepper (don’t go crazy on the salt). Add anchovies, black olives, capers, and other pickled things (pickled mushrooms, jalapeños, pearl onions, etc). Pour your black olive juice right into the sauce pan. Let it cook until the sauce has absorbed the olive juice. Top with cheese.
  • Marinara: Brown some garlic and onions in olive oil. Add tomato paste to the pan after the onions and garlic have turned golden, and swirl it around so that it gets toasted. Add your canned tomatoes and any dried herbs you may be using (thyme, parsley, oregano… but be gentle with your oregano pouring). Let reduce if you added the dried herbs, otherwise add fresh herbs and serve immediately. Put this on your pizza or in your lasagna. 
  • Bolognese: Cook your meat first with oil, seasoning with cumin, garlic powder, pepper and salt. Or whatever spice blend you enjoy. Remove the cooked meat, and use the juices as the base for your tomato sauce. Pour your canned tomatoes and mix the sauces. Add chopped carrots or your other favorite vegetables. Cook until the veggies are fork tender, and add your meat back in. Hearty and warming! 

Thin Tomato Sauce 

This type of sauce always reminds me of summertime at my parent’s house when my mom would make her basil tomato sauce (see bellow). A thin sauce doesn’t have to be lighter than a thick sauce, but it definitely interacts with pasta differently and really needs a long pasta or a penne pasta to properly pick it up.

1. Fresh tomatoes. You don’t need to spend your lifesavings on beautiful heirloom tomatoes (in fact I’d urge you to just eat any heirloom tomato you happen upon raw). Any old tomato will do, even ones that are starting to sag and move towards the end of their lives. One fresh tomato makes two meals for me.

2. Cutting tomatoes. Cut the bottom of the tomato off and slice your tomato that way, cutting into the core. This way, no part of your tomato goes unused. For quick cooking, chop the tomato up small. If you have more time, leave large chunks to caramelize. You get a bit more flavor this way, but we don’t all have the luxury of time, so don’t stress about it.

3. Sauce base. With this type of tomato sauce, your base is 90% oil. The tomatoes themselves aren’t heavy enough to carry themselves, so do not skimp on the oil. I recommend cooking garlic and onions and browning them before adding your tomatoes. Allow them to dissolve into the sauce while you do your dishes or whatever. 

4. Acidity. Fresh tomatoes can make for a really acidic sauce. Make sure to cook some veggies or meat to help balance out the flavor. Cook these in a separate pan while your tomatoes are reducing. Remove them, and pour their juices into the sauce. I recommend bacon. 

5. Too much reducing/gloppy sauce. You may have to add water if your sauce becomes too reduced. Don’t worry if you add too much water, just let the sauce reduce to a comfortable consistency. Add your fresh herbs minutes before it’s done. I would skip the spices or dried herbs, their taste is too powerful for this sort of sauce. 

Some easy thin sauce combos: 

  • Hello onion: Caramelize half an onion. Chop it up into thin slices so that it will cook faster. Cook bacon and pour the drippings over the cooking onion. Add your fresh tomatoes and add water to help everything reduce. Be careful adding salt, the pasta will have salt from the bacon juices already. Add the crumbled bacon after you’ve turned the sauce off. 
  • Mom’s basil sauce: Using olive oil and chopped garlic, cook tomatoes with salt and pepper. Add basil when the tomatoes have reduced. 
  • Veggie blast: Brown onions and garlic (or not). After they’ve browned, add your favorite veggies to the sauce. I have a soft spot for squashes so I like to use eggplant and whatever squash we have in our fridge. I encourage you to get creative and to try different things. Add your tomatoes shortly after adding your veggies, because you don’t want the veggies to overcook and becoming mushy. Add spinach or kale after the sauce has reduced, and season heavily with salt and pepper. Seriously, veggies need salt.
Basic ideas for kitchen witchery

These are not recipes, but ideas - what meal could serve what purpose. They are simple, so you either should have your own recipes for them, or find them on the internet easy enough. 

Happy cooking!

BANISHING

  • chili (cayenne pepper, black pepper, chili - generally spicy things)
  • lemon-infused water (lemon is a repellant, and water is uncrossable for some entities)
  • sugarfree coffee with cinnamon (coffee and cinnamon are both banishing ingredients)
  • curry (cayenne pepper, black pepper, chili - generally spicy things)

PROTECTION

  • caprese salad (basil, tomatoes)
  • margarita pizza (basil, tomatoes)
  • apple pie (apples)
  • corn-on-a-cob (corn)
  • mint tea (mint)
  • herb soup (rosemary, basil, mint, thyme, bay leaf…)

HEALING

  • apple pie (apples)
  • golden milk (milk and turmeric)
  • elderflower tea (elderflower)
  • mint tea (mint)
  • onion syrup (onion and honey)
  • chamomile tea (chamomile)
  • lemon-infused water (lemon)
  • ginger tea (ginger)
  • nettle soup (nettle)
  • pumpkin soup (pumpkin)
  • pumpkin cookies or bread (pumpkin)
  • curry (turmeric, garlic, onion)

LUCK

  • cinnamon rolls (cinnamon)
  • orange juice (orange)
  • chamomile tea (chamomile)
  • corn-on-a-cob (corn)
  • pineapple juice (pineapple)
  • poppyseed buns or bread (poppy)

HAPPINESS

  • orange juice (orange)
  • honeyed tea (honey)
  • mint tea (mint)
  • lemon-infused water (lemon)
  • vanilla-flavoured ice cream (vanilla)
  • sunflower seed buns or bread (sunflower)
  • sugar cookies (sugar)

PEACE

  • lemon balm tea (lemon balm)
  • lavender-infused water (lavender)
  • cucumber-infused water (cucumber)
  • vanilla-flavoured ice cream (vanilla)

PROSPERITY

  • milk with honey (milk and honey)
  • apple pie (apple)
  • pumpkin soup (pumpkin)
  • pumpkin cookies or bread (pumpkin)
  • chocolate chip cookies (chocolate) 
  • sandwich - any (bread)
  • fried rice (rice)
  • curry (rice)
  • fries (potatoes)
3

Vegan Pumpkin Spice French Toast

Ingredients:

  • 4 slices of thick bread or toast
  • ¾ cup dairy free milk (I used soy)
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 tbsp flour (I used chickpea)
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 2 tbsp pumpkin puree
  • 1 tbsp vegan butter for frying
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice for garnishing (optional)
  • 1 tbsp sugar for garnishing (optional)

Directions:

1. Slice your bread into equal strips and set aside.

2. Combine the remaining ingredients in a wide bowl and whisk well.

3. Melt butter in a large pan. Quickly dip the toast slices into your batter. Do not soak! Then transfer the battered slices to your heated pan and fry each side until crust has formed (about 2 minutes on each side).

4. Once all slices have finished you can roll them into a sugar mixture (optional) and serve with maple syrup. Enjoy!

DIY Apple Rose Pastries


Yields 12 pastries

The things you’ll need

Ingredients
  • 3 Honeycrisp apples
  • 1 package Puff Pastry, thawed
  • Lemon
  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
Equipment
  • Medium bowl of water
  • Cutting board & knife
  • Medium mixing bowl
  • Small mixing bowl
  • Rolling pin
  • Bench flour
  • Small mixing bowl
  • Spoon
  • Dry brush
  • Cupcake tray
  • Pan spray
  • Strainer

Let’s get started!

  1. Preheat oven to 375ºF.
  2. Combine butter, honey, vanilla, salt, and cinnamon in a small mixing bowl. Mix until smooth.
  3. Squeeze half a lemon into the water. Cut apples in half lengthwise and remove the core. Slice each half into thin slivers and then soak them in the lemon water.
  4. Microwave the soaking apples ntil soft, about 4 to 5 minutes. Drain the apples and then pat them dry.
  5. Roll out each sheet of puff pastry to abot 12 by 12 inches. Cut out six 2-inch by 12-inch strips and then brush off excess flour.
  6. Spread a thin layer of honey butter onto one side of each pastry strip. Arrange the apples lengthwise slightly overlapping as you go, skin towards the top.
  7. Fold the pastry up over the apple slices. Start at one end and roll the pastry into a swirl.
  8. Repeat steps 5 through 7 with the other sheet of puff pastry.
  9. Place each pastry into a greased cupcake tray and bake for about 35 to 40 minutes, until golden brown
  10. TaDa! A dozen dainty Apple Rose Pastries to break the spell of sweet cravings!

anonymous asked:

This year I'm moving into a school owned apartment on my school's campus, but the kitchenette only has a microwave. I'm kind of having a hard time looking for ways that I can cook myself more meals than just the frozen stuff at the grocery store and I wondered if you had some advice ?

Check out your college’s student handbook, and see if they allow any of the following cooking appliances. These can get expensive, but are well worth the money and will give you more dining options:

I would also recommend you get some cooking supplies like this set sold on Amazon. There’s also this microwave cooking set. I’ve scoured the Internet and found you the following recipes. 

Microwave Cooking Recipes

Apple Pie

Applesauce

Baked Potatoes/Yams

Banana French Toast Sticks

Brownie

Cauliflower Rice

Cheesy Flatbread

Chicken and Rice Wraps

Chocolate Cupcakes

Cookie In A Cup

Corn on the Cob

Egg Sandwich

Egg White Omelettes

Espresso Mug Cake

Fudge

Gluten Free Muffin

Green Bean Casserole

Grilled chicken + veggies

Ham, Cheese, and Chicken Rolls 

Humus

Mac + Cheese

Mac + Cheese 2

Mashed Potato

Microwave Mochi

Microwave Breakfast Mug

Mug Lasagna 

Nachos for One

Nutella Cookie

Oatmeal

Omelette In A Mug

Pasta

Pita Pizza

Peanutbutter Mug Cake

Pineapple Upside Down Cake

Pork Chinese Bun

Pork Chow Mein

Pulled Chicken Sandwich 

Pumpkin Cake

Rice

Rice + Veggies

Scrambled Eggs

Soup

Spaghetti Squash

Spiced Apple Cake

Stuffed Zucchini 

Sweet Potato Chips

Tuna Melt

Vegan Mug Brownies

Compilation Posts

“18 Microwave Snacks You Can Cook In A Mug” by Buzzfeed

“50 Healthy Microwave Recipes” by DIYNow.net

“Dining Hall Blues” by Michelle Ma

Ree Drummond’s “Dorm Room Dining”

4

Made some Blueberries compote because I was given pounds and pounds of fresh Blueberries (hooray for Blueberries season). I used two cups of Blueberries, which I cooked in a large pot over medium heat. These were pretty ripe, so I didn’t feel the need to add water, as they popped open easily and the juices came out. I added 9 spoonful of Lavender honey and 30 drops of Lemon juice. Simmered it until the Blueberries were mostly broken down and it became a syrup-like consistency. Made exactly to fill the jar somehow (magic). This will keep in the fridge for a week, but probably will be gone a lot sooner. Super easy and super low energy to do this. It will become more like a jam/jelly once it cools down and sets.

Crispy “Chicken” Cauliflower (vegan)

Happy Thursday, friends! I recently posted a picture of cauliflower “chicken” burgers on my instagram, and everyone was asking for a recipe. I decided to make it a second time to perfect the recipe before sharing. 

Ingredients:
- 1 head of cauliflower
- 2 cups flour
- 1.5 cups water
- Panko bread crumbs (I don’t know how much I used… I just kept adding to the bowl as I went along. Probably ¾ to 1 box all together, depending on the size of your cauliflower.)
- 1 tsp salt
- 1 tsp garlic powder
- ½ tsp pepper
- ½ tsp thyme
- 1 tsp paprika
- ½ tsp chili flakes (optional)
- Any sauces you like (if you want to coat cauliflower afterwards)

** All seasoning can and should be adjusted to your liking! Feel free to add or take away anything.

Instructions:
1) Cut the cauliflower! After rinsing, cut in half and remove the green leaves and stock. If you want to make sandwiches, cut the cauliflower into steaks. You can also cut into large florets to give the feeling of pieces of chicken. Or you can cut them into small florets for cauliflower wings. Just keep in mind that baking time will be different if you cut them into smaller pieces.
2) In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, water, and paprika. Whisk together until smooth.
3) In a separate bowl, combine 1.5 cups of panko with the salt, garlic powder, pepper, thyme, and chili flakes.
4) Have a baking sheet lined with parchment paper ready. Dip the cauliflower in the batter, and tap off any excess. Then bread with panko. Place breaded cauliflower on the baking sheet. Continue for all pieces.
5) Bake at 450 F for 35 min, flipping halfway through. If you wish to coat your cauliflower in sauce (buffalo or BBQ, for example), remove the cauliflower 10 min before the baking is done, coat in sauce, and return to the oven for the remaining 10 min. 
6) ENJOY!!!

Chickpea flour pancakes 🥞

Ingredients
- 1 chia egg (1 T chia seeds + 2 T warm water, let sit for 5 mins)
- ½ cup chickpea flour
- ½ cup plant milk
- 1 t baking powder
- Sweetener if you want it

Recipe
- Mix all ingredients
- Scoop out spoonfuls onto a hot greased pan (I used 1 T coconut oil)
- Wait for bubbles to form, flip
- They’re ready when they’re golden
- Eat them!!

Witcher Toffee


Dairy Free

The things you’ll need

Ingredients
  • 1 cup honey
  • ½ cup agave
  • 2 cups almond butter
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon almond extract
Equipment

Let’s get started!

  1. Mix honey, agave, sea salt and extracts in a medium sauce pot and place in a candy thermometer.
  2. Cook the mixture on low heat for 12 minutes, stirring constantly with a rubber spatula. Do not allow the mixture to exceed 250°F.
  3. Add almond butter and cook for an additional 2 to 3 minutes or until it pulls away from the pot.
  4. Remove the mixture from the heat and using a spoon to place it into your mold.
  5. Allow the mixture to cool in the molds and remove them once they have hardened.
  6. TaDa! This Witcher Toffee will make an alliance with your taste buds!

anonymous asked:

Hi, first off I love your blog! Next, I work full time at differing hours and am having a hard time with breakfasts lately. When I work late I have no issue eating some cereal in the morning, but whenever I'm working early its pop-tarts or McDonald's. Do you have any tips for a healthier start? I love breakfast but I'm tired of these pop-tarts lol.

I can relate so much to this!

Breakfast on the Go

1. Breakfast Burritos. Cook these in bulk during your downtime and freeze them all! Defrost them and throw them in a microwave on your way out the door. BOOM.

2. Granola/Cereal Bags. One of my favorite quick breakfasts. Buy your favorite granola and/or cereal and divide it into plastic bags. Are store brands too expensive or not to your liking? Make your own granola with dried fruit, nuts, protein bites, flax seeds, etc. It’s okay to put a handful of chocolate in, just so long as you make your mix 95% healthy. My favorite brand is Bakery on Main (they’re gluten free btw).

3. Yogurt. Buy yogurt in bulk and top with your favorite granola or fresh fruit. My boyfriend loves the Siggis brand. This particular greek yogurt is packed with a ridiculous amount of protein and not overly sweet.

4. Bagels/toast. Bagels/toast literally take five minutes to prepare in the morning, and can be topped with anything from cream cheese to peanut butter. Buy bulk and freeze what you’re not eating immediately. 

5. Smoothies. Smoothies are a wonderfully healthy alternative to most of your other breakfast options! Blend your favorite fruits and veggies, most smoothies will keep for 48 hours. If you would prefer the easier route of a pre-made smoothie, I recommend Bolthouse smoothies. These will keep in your fridge for up to a week!

6. Oats. The sensation that is sweeping the nation! Click here.

7. Health Food Bars. You know the ones I’m talking about- Cliff Bars, Luna Bars, etc. While these can get pricey, they require no effort on your part and can be stored for upwards of six months. 

8. Fruit. There is nothing that I love more than a cut up apple and a spoon full of chunky peanut butter. Keep your fridge stocked with all your favorite fruits. Apples and bananas are delicious all year long and easy to eat on the go, because they require zero preparation. Add peanut butter to give yourself an added dose of protein.

9. Hardboiled Eggs. I would recommend preparing these in bulk when you have time. Hardboiled eggs will last in your fridge for up to a week! Buy yourself a handy dandy egg slicer and sprinkle with your favorite seasonings. 

10. Leftovers. I love eating leftovers for breakfast- just throw them in your microwave or oven and they’re ready to go in no time. I particularly love eating leftover pizza, salad, and sandwiches for breakfast. 

Also please check out my favorite food-related infographic! Excellent suggestions for meals/snacks on the go.

Hope this helps!

Chicken Ranch Wraps

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cooked grilled chicken breasts chopped (seasoned with your favorite spices, see note*)
  • ¼ cup Hidden Valley® Simply Ranch dressing
  • ½ cup mozzarella cheese
  • ¼ cup cilantro minced (optional)
  • 4 8 “ tortillas

Instructions

  1. Lay tortillas on a clean flat surface. Place about ½ cup chicken, 1 tablespoon ranch, 2 tablespoons of cheese, and 1 tablespoon of minced cilantro on each tortilla. Fold tightly to form a burrito shape.

  2. Heat a heavy-duty pan or grill to medium heat. Coat with a light layer or oil or cooking spray and cook wraps for 1-2 minutes on each side or until the tortilla is crispy and golden. Remove from heat, slice in half and serve immediately.

Recipe Notes: for the chicken: You can use cooked rotisserie chicken, leftover chicken, or grilled chicken seasoned with your favorite spices. I like to season my chicken with a tablespoon of fajita seasoning and grill in a hot pan for 5-6 minutes per side or until cooked through.