easy and fast

Since we have some Jewish holidays coming up, let’s talk about how to interact with them

On this thursday is Rosh Hashanna:

- this is the jewish new year, we are entering the year 5778. It comemorates when adam and eve were created.

- If you see someone jewish, or have jewish friends and family, say “L’Shana Tova (Le-Sha-Nah-Toe-Vah). It’s a greeting and a wish for a happy new year!

- We dip apples in honey to remind us of the sweetness of life and to bring sweetness into ourselves for a new year

-We eat a circular challah to symbolize the cycles of time, the challah often has raisins in it to add extra sweetness

-This is a happy holiday, full of joy

Beginning on Friday, September 30th is Yom Kippur:

- This is the jewish day of atonement, when we think about our wrongdoings of the past year and think about how we can commit to doing better in the next year.

- Many Jewish people fast, abstaining from food and water from sundown to sundown. The fast is roughly 25 hours. HOWEVER, if you need to eat, you may. There are lots of reasons that people may not fast, like recovering from an eating disorder, a medical condition like diabetes, or having to take medication with food. The elderly, children, and pregnant people should not fast.

- This is a solemn holiday, many people spend all day in synagogue in deep prayer. 

- On Yom Kippur, wish someone a peaceful or meaningful fast. Some people may take offense to the concept of having an “easy” or “enjoyable” fast because Yom Kippur is not about ease or comfort. 

- There is a breaking of the fast at sundown, this is usually a joyous event

Together, these make up the High Holy Days, the most important week in Judaism. 

please reblog to educate and spread awareness

6

Anon said: i love ur fusion art!!!! if u have time/want to you should do a bakushima fusion

You’re not the only one that asked, but actually I already did draw it! It’s the first one I’ve drawn haha I felt like drawing it again tho, so here’s a doodled comic of the first time they fused accidentally ✌️

In the Pokemon fandom, every once in a while you stumble upon a ‘Pokeballs are $200′ joke. In reference to how Pokeballs cost 200 of the in-game currency:

What a lot of fans, especially more casual ones, don’t seem to realize is that the currency in the Pokemon games it based on the Japanese yen. The symbol for the currency in the games even resembles the yen symbol:

In fact, according to Bulbapedia, the ‘Poke dollar’ symbol was specifically created for the English translations of the games, and the original Japanese versions use the yen symbol.

Now, for perspective, although the exact exchange rate naturally varies, a US dollar is equivalent to about 120 Japanese yen. So, 200 yen is about $1.67. 

A Pokeball in the Pokemon games actually cost less then two bucks. 

There’s a REASON we see so many young kids training Pokemon, especially early in the games. The cost of investing into a Pokeball to try catching their own Pokemon easily falls into the range of a typical kid’s allowance. A Potion for healing after battles is 300 (or about $2.50), but since Pokemon Centers offer their healing services for free, that’s a moot point.

Youngsters in the early game only give within a range from 50-150 of the currency, which is about equivalent to $0.40-$1.25. The first Gym Leader in Hoenn Region, Roxanne, give 1,680 in Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire, equivalent to about $14. Which is about right for the equivalent of a middle or high school honors student. A later Gym Leader, Winona, gives 4,200, or about $35. The Champion, Steven, gives 11600, or $96.67.

The winnings from enemy Trainers varies, but Ace Trainers seem to give out about 1500 or $14 on average, give or take. Swimmers (especially common later in ORAS), award a range from 400-800, or $3.33-$6.67.

Vitamins (such as Calcium, Iron, and HP UP), cost 9,800 or $81.67 each. An Ultra Ball cost 1,200, or $10. A Paralyze Heal costs the same as a Pokeball, while an Awakening is half that. A Revive is 1,500, or $12.50.

What’s the point of doing this? Well, for one, to get a better sense of the in-game economics, which can be hard to grasp if one doesn’t realize the in-game ‘Poke dollars’ are based on the Japanese yen. And a look at said economics reveals some interesting details.

First, it shows basic Pokemon training and raising is well within the affordability of a ten-year old, or older. Which makes sense as Pokemon is aimed at younger kids, and the develops would want them to have the sense that going on a Pokemon journey is something they could do if they somehow ended up in the Pokemon world.

On the other hand, it also shows there’s really not that much money to be made in Pokemon raising and traning, unless you battle frequently and regularly against higher-level opponents regularly and and win. Which is…very much in line with how professional sports work in real-life. Pokemon battling gets compared to a sporting event a lot for a reason. The initial 3-D games were even called Pokemon *Stadium.* Parallels are frequently drawn between the Pokemon League tournaments and the Olympics in the anime. The low money output is probably also why we often see Gym Leaders and the like working other jobs.

Just something interesting I decided to look into. I’m a Pokemon fan first, before any other fandom, and always will be. It’s shocking that I haven’t written any meta on it yet.

Hope you enjoyed!

EDIT:  As pointed out by invenblocker:

The 1000000 price for the bicycle translates to $8259.51, which is the price of a top quality bike for proffesionals.

Excellent catch! Helps explain why the bikes can ride through stuff like snow and sand. They are of excellent make.

And it also helps explain why the bike shop owners are happy to give out their bikes to a prospective Pokemon Trainer for free (whether through a voucher or otherwise). Your average Trainer taking the Gym challenge puts those bikes through the *wringer.* Riding them along mountains, through marshes, and even through snow. But a bike being able to endure that is the kind of thing a professional rider would look for, and desire.

Most Pokemon Trainers will never be able to afford the bikes, but are in one of the best positions to push them to their limits. So giving them out for free is actually a clever marketing move. Imagine a potential buyer seeing a Trainer riding one of those bikes in Lillycove, and said Trainer reveals they rode it from Rustboro (which means they rose it around a mountain, several caves, a few marshes, and possibly other environments I’m not thinking of right now). That’s a hell of an impression to make, and a fast, easy way to sell the buyer on getting the bike themselves, especially if they ride competitively.

Case in point, in Pokemon Gold/Silver and their re-makes, the bike shop even gives you the bike specifically as ‘advertising.’ After you’ve ridden it around long enough, you get a call saying that because of you doing so, their sales have shot through the roof (and happily tell you to keep the bike). And it’s no wonder why.

2

trade mistakes // panic! at the disco

Ramen hacks 101

Hey does anyone else have a lot of trouble getting out of bed and feeding themselves sometimes? Yeah me too. BUT I’ve basically gotten the cheap, easy, fast ramen thing down to a T by this point and thought I’d share it with you guys. It can be made very easily for any type of diet, including gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian. 

Time: Will vary depending on your ingredients, but at minimum it’ll take about 5-10 minutes. 

For just a soup base+noodles, you will need:

  • A package of cheap-ass ramen noodles - throw away the seasoning packet or save it to use with something else. Buy in bulk if you don’t want to go to the store every time you want noodles. If you’re gluten-free, get rice noodles or another gluten-free option. 
  • Miso paste - I got mine for about $3, and it lasts for a very long time in the fridge. Pro tip: it’s cheaper at an Asian grocery store or market if you have access to one.
  • Stock cube/paste - around $2 at my local grocery store. I went for low-sodium chicken stock cubes, but you use your preferred type.
  • Water - about 2-3 cups for one portion depending on how big your bowl is. Remember, if you’re adding in extras, the liquid level will rise. I’ve made that mistake way too many times.

If you want extras, some good options to mix and match at your preference/budget/convenience are

Vegetables:

  • Bean sprouts - super cheap at the grocery store. Just throw a handful in and call it a day. I like mine to still be a little crunchy so I do it in the last 2 minutes of cooking.
  • Snow peas - ditto to the bean sprouts. Extras can be frozen.
  • Onion - I typically use half or a quarter of a white onion cut into thin slices, and tossed in the broth asap because I like it a bit more tender. Freeze the rest if you’re not going to be using it within the next few days.
  • Green onion/scallions - 1-2 will be good for one portion. Slice in thin disks, or on an angle if you’re fancy. Also you can use both the tops (green) and the bottoms (white), but that’s to your preference. I typically use these as a garnish, but you can add them in whenever you’d like.
  • Bok/pak choi - one of my favorite vegetables in the entire world. It can be found in most grocery stores nowadays, but is much cheaper at an Asian market if you have access to one. Cut off the very bottom part and then cut the pieces in half length-wise. Throw them in at the beginning if you like them softer, or in the last 3 minutes if you still want them a bit crunchy.
  • Spinach - just chuck in a handful whenever. Spinach can also be used frozen and is often cheaper to either buy it already frozen, or buy fresh in bulk and store it in your freezer to have forever. Get those vitamins!
  • Shredded carrot - you may not have the time/energy to shred carrots. Buy the pre-shredded kind and freeze whatever you have left over.
  • Corn - use frozen.
  • Mushrooms - slice thinly or buy pre-sliced. Add to broth toward the beginning.

Protein:

  • Tofu - silken tofu is usually the best option for this, but use whatever it is you have/can afford. Cut into small cubes and add whenever you’d like.
  • Soft-boiled egg - how to boil an egg or whatever your favorite method is.
  • Chicken - use leftover cooked chicken to add to your soup or slice a raw chicken breast thinly and poach it at a gentle simmer in the broth for 7-10 minutes or until it is white and opaque. It does take a little extra time, but you don’t actually have to do anything while it cooks and this will add extra flavor. Pre-marinated chicken is good for this as well (look for “Asian” flavors like soy, sesame, ginger, garlic, chili, etc.). Again, more expensive or time-consuming if you’re marinating it yourself, but it’s up to you. 
  • Shrimp - use pre-cooked frozen shrimp to save time and just dump in a handful. Buy the frozen stuff in bulk. Or, like with the chicken, poach raw shrimp in the broth until they are pink and opaque. 

Additional flavorings:

  • Garlic - either use a garlic crusher if you have it or just toss in thin slices into the pan with a little bit of veg or sesame oil for about 2 minutes, before you add your liquid. I buy pre-crushed frozen garlic that comes in little cubes and just pop them straight into whatever I’m cooking. There’s also that pre-crushed/chopped garlic in a paste or little jars. The pre-prepared stuff is more expensive than just buying bulbs of garlic BUT it will last you a while and saves a lot of time and energy.
  • Ginger - same as the garlic.
  • Chilis - chopped into thin disks. Take out the seeds and white part inside the chili if you don’t like it too spicy. Add as a garnish or into the broth if you like it a little spicier.
  • Hot sauce - use your favorite brand.
  • Chili oil - I got mine for about $1.50 and it’s a must-have for me in my soup. I drizzle a couple teaspoons on top when my soup is all done.
  • Soy sauce - light or dark soy is fine. Add as much or as little as you like.
  • Sesame oil - this is quite strong, so a little goes a long way. Use about a teaspoon.
  • Fish sauce, oyster sauce, rice wine/mirin/sake - these are great flavors but may be a bit harder to find and tend to be a little more expensive. Use about 1-2 teaspoons if you have it.
  • Cilantro - throw the stalks into your broth and strain them out afterward or just use the leaves as a garnish.
  • Lemon or lime - a squeeze to taste.
  • Sesame seeds - sprinkle on top.

Like I said, all the above ingredients are simply suggestions. It’s up to you to decide what you want, what you have the time and energy for, and what you can afford. This is just to show you the range of options.

Method:

  1. Prep whatever ingredients you’re using (slice/chop/take out of freezer). If you’re not using any, just go to step 2.
  2. Bring 2-3 cups of water to a boil. If you have an electric kettle, this will make the process much quicker.
  3. Add in your stock cube and miso paste and cook for about 2 minutes until they dissolve. You may want to stir a couple times just to help it along. 
  4. Add in whatever vegetables/protein/additional flavorings above suit your fancy and cook to your liking. 
  5. Add noodles and cook for 3 minutes. 
  6. Put food in bowl. Don’t worry about making it pretty. Garnish as you like.
  7. Put food in mouth. 

Done!

Put any leftover soup you may have into a tupperware or thermos and take it to work/school the next day. Or save it for 3-4 days in the fridge and heat it up when you’re hungry. 

Another pro tip: you can make the soup base in bulk and freeze whatever you don’t use. when you want soup but don’t want to go through the whole process again, stick the frozen soup in the microwave/melt in a pot on the stove, bring to a boil, add in your noodles/extras and you’re good to go.

Enjoy!

Why your MBTI type is so cool:

ENFP: You’re outgoing in a childish-yet likeable way. Your energy is youthful and it’s refreshing to others.

INFP: You’re chill to hang around. If i had a stressful day, I’d go chill with an INFP. You guys always have food + comfort.

ENTP: You always have new ideas and new thoughts. You guys are flexible and easy to get along with, super funny.

INFJ: You can always relate in some way, and you guys are really easy to vent to and you give the best comfort.

ISFJ: You all are so warm and kind. You all always offer to do things for others and dont really expect much in return.

INTP: You all have a dark energy, you can always handle talking about ‘dark’ subjects and dark things.

ISTJ: You are practical and real, you’re honest in a kind way and very mature and grounded.

ESFP: You guys are wild and hard to keep up with, but in a fun way! There’s never a dull moment with you.

ESTJ: No other type can get things done as easy, practical and fast as you can. Also you are very loyal.

ESFJ: You usually know what’s best for others, which makes you very capable of being of useful help which people appreciates.

ENFJ: You encourage other people and know how to bring out the potential in others.

ISTP: You don’t care for shallow things, you’re real and fun in a weird way.

INTJ: You know how to tell puns that aren’t too dry and how to keep them coming. Thanks for always brightening the sometimes awkward mood you create by clever puns.

ISFP: Competetive, a trait that makes you ideal as a teammate and ensures victory.

Antonyms in Russian ๐Ÿ’ซ

·       бе́дный - бога́тый (poor - rich)

·       безопа́сный - опа́сный (safe - dangerous)

·       большо́й - ма́ленький (big - small)

·       всегда́ - никогда́ (always - never)

·       гря́зный - чи́стый (dirty - clean)

·       дли́нный - коро́ткий (long - short)

·       дорого́й - дешёвый (expensive - cheap)

·       друго́й - похо́жий (different - similar)

·       живо́й - мёртвый (alive - dead)

·       интере́сный - ску́чный (interesting - boring)

·       краси́вый - уро́дливый (beautiful - ugly)

·       лёгкий - сло́жный (easy - difficult)

·       ме́дленно - бы́стро (slow - fast)

·       ме́ньше - бо́льше (less - more)

·       молодо́й - ста́рый (young - old)

·       мя́гкий - твёрдый/жёсткий (soft - hard)

·       но́вый - ста́рый (new - old)

·       норма́льный - стра́нный (normal - weird)

·       пра́вый - ле́вый (right - left)

·       пусто́й - по́лный (empty - full)

·       ра́но - по́здно (early - late)

·       свобо́дный - за́нятый (free - busy)

·       споко́йный - не́рвный (calm - nervous)

·       тёмный - све́тлый (dark - light)

·       тёплый - холо́дный (warm - cold)

·       тяжёлый - лёгкий (heavy - light)

·       у́мный - глу́пый (clever - stupid)

·       хоро́ший - плохо́й (good - bad)

·       ча́сто - ре́дко (often - seldom)


enjoy! (: 

anonymous asked:

Hi, first off I love your blog! Next, I work full time at differing hours and am having a hard time with breakfasts lately. When I work late I have no issue eating some cereal in the morning, but whenever I'm working early its pop-tarts or McDonald's. Do you have any tips for a healthier start? I love breakfast but I'm tired of these pop-tarts lol.

I can relate so much to this!

Breakfast on the Go

1. Breakfast Burritos. Cook these in bulk during your downtime and freeze them all! Defrost them and throw them in a microwave on your way out the door. BOOM.

2. Granola/Cereal Bags. One of my favorite quick breakfasts. Buy your favorite granola and/or cereal and divide it into plastic bags. Are store brands too expensive or not to your liking? Make your own granola with dried fruit, nuts, protein bites, flax seeds, etc. It’s okay to put a handful of chocolate in, just so long as you make your mix 95% healthy. My favorite brand is Bakery on Main (they’re gluten free btw).

3. Yogurt. Buy yogurt in bulk and top with your favorite granola or fresh fruit. My boyfriend loves the Siggis brand. This particular greek yogurt is packed with a ridiculous amount of protein and not overly sweet.

4. Bagels/toast. Bagels/toast literally take five minutes to prepare in the morning, and can be topped with anything from cream cheese to peanut butter. Buy bulk and freeze what you’re not eating immediately. 

5. Smoothies. Smoothies are a wonderfully healthy alternative to most of your other breakfast options! Blend your favorite fruits and veggies, most smoothies will keep for 48 hours. If you would prefer the easier route of a pre-made smoothie, I recommend Bolthouse smoothies. These will keep in your fridge for up to a week!

6. Oats. The sensation that is sweeping the nation! Click here.

7. Health Food Bars. You know the ones I’m talking about- Cliff Bars, Luna Bars, etc. While these can get pricey, they require no effort on your part and can be stored for upwards of six months. 

8. Fruit. There is nothing that I love more than a cut up apple and a spoon full of chunky peanut butter. Keep your fridge stocked with all your favorite fruits. Apples and bananas are delicious all year long and easy to eat on the go, because they require zero preparation. Add peanut butter to give yourself an added dose of protein.

9. Hardboiled Eggs. I would recommend preparing these in bulk when you have time. Hardboiled eggs will last in your fridge for up to a week! Buy yourself a handy dandy egg slicer and sprinkle with your favorite seasonings. 

10. Leftovers. I love eating leftovers for breakfast- just throw them in your microwave or oven and they’re ready to go in no time. I particularly love eating leftover pizza, salad, and sandwiches for breakfast. 

Also please check out my favorite food-related infographic! Excellent suggestions for meals/snacks on the go.

Hope this helps!

more quick doodles since i really shouldn’t be drawing right now;; this time the characters from carry on! just getting a feel on their designs cause i wanna draw them for realsies sometime.

anonymous asked:

Oh my god your canon vs fanon Kuroo post was perfection can you do one for Bokuto please!!! I will never inderstand where people got the "pary animal sex god Kuroo" thing I mean the dude makes poetic speeches and insults people using chemestry he is probably full nerd

oh man this is so much harder because bokuto is actually really complex

fanon bokuto:

  • hopeless moron
  • helpless baby bird who cannot tie his own shoes without akaashi there
  • fluctuates between fragile, crushed soul and raging egomaniac
  • collapses at everything for childish reasons
  • also a party animal
  • constantly talking

canon bokuto:

  • measures up tsukishima’s entire character and primary struggles after 2-3 meetings, after even kuroo failed to understand him. you know,  because he’s a bristly asshole who is hard to understand. gives him pinpoint accurate advice. still punctuates it with “well hey i might be wrong though”
  • does this for hinata as well
  • able to strategize in midair, something that is notoriously hard to do. has an outrageous skillset to go with it. practices nonstop to achieve this
  • for the most part extremely reliable. akaashi keiji’s words, and i get the feeling that akaashi keiji does not embellish
  • scatterbrained and easily distracted but also able to get into moments of crazy focus during a game
  • his mood swings are clearly involuntary and pass quickly when he’s given a success to focus on which btw is not easy to do in a fast paced sport. i mean i know akaashi kind of leads him to the success but it’s bokuto who manages to get back on track after 1-2 good points which… holy shit that takes some killer determination when your brain is on fire in a mood swing
  • brags some. asks for verbal validation more. is super happy but also kind of sheepish when hinata is amazed by him, and subsequently dedicates himself to teaching hinata tricks
  • overjoyed to talk or work with anyone
  • takes a lot of teasing. seriously, everyone he hangs out with pokes fun at him, and he handles it with very minimal sulking
  • actually spends a lot of time kinda sizing things up silently? seriously, though, he’s actually… not that much of a chatterbox, unless he’s pestering akaashi for praise.
  • i would literally fight anyone for bokuto koutarou but i don’t have to because if someone has hurt him then akaashi keiji has already murdered them in a back alley