eastern catholics

Iraqi-Assyrian Christians attend Mass inside the Our Lady of Salvation/Deliverance Syriac Catholic Church - Baghdad, Iraq

Black history month day 17: St. Moses the Black.

Saint Moses the Black (330–405), (also known as Abba Moses the Robber, the Abyssinian, the Ethiopian, and the Strong) was an ascetic monk, priest,and a notable Desert Father.

St. Moses was a servant of a government official in Egypt who dismissed him for theft and suspected murder. He became the leader of a gang of bandits who roamed the Nile Valley spreading terror and violence. Once while attempting to hide from local authorities, he took shelter with some monks in a colony in the desert of Wadi El Natrun, then called Sketes, near Alexandria. Their peace, faith. And commitment deeply influenced Moses deeply and he soon gave up his old way of life and was baptized and joined the monastic community at Scetes.

St. Moses was known for his imposing strength. He was once attacked by a group of robbers in his desert cell. He fought back, overpowered the intruders, and dragged them to the chapel where the other monks were at prayer. He told the brothers that he did not think it Christian to hurt the robbers and asked what he should do with them.

Though Moses was very zealous, he became discouraged when he concluded he was not perfect enough. Early one morning, Saint Isidore, abbot of the monastery, took Moses to the roof and together they watched the first rays of dawn come over the horizon. Isidore told Moses, “Only slowly do the rays of the sun drive away the night and usher in a new day, and thus, only slowly does one become a perfect contemplative.”

Once Moses was invited to a meeting to discuss an appropriate penance for a fellow monk who had sinned, When he came to the meeting, Moses took a leaking jug filled with water, or possibly a basket full of sand, and carried it on his shoulder. Upon being asked why he was carrying the jug, he replied, “My sins run out behind me and I do not see them, but today I am coming to judge the errors of another.” On hearing this, the assembled brothers forgave the erring monk.

St. Moses died at around 75 while defending his monastery from bandits. He is venerated in the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, Oriental Orthodox Churches, Eastern Catholic Churches, and the Lutheran Church. He is the patron saint of Africa and pacifism.

flickr

Karneval in Erfurt, Thüringen, Eastern Germany. There are 3 different words in German for ‘carnival’: Karneval, Fasching, and Fastnacht. Although all 3 refer to the same pre-Lenten observance, each has a slightly different tradition and reflects the customs in different regions. Generally speaking, Karneval is the word used in the Rheinland in North/West Germany, while Fasching and Fastnacht are used further South. The big day for Karneval is Rose Monday; Fasching parades usually take place the day before. One of Germany’s largest parades happens in Braunschweig in Niedersachsen - it’s called “Schoduvel” (“scaring away the devil”) and dates back to 1293. The term Fasching is also seen in Berlin and other parts of Northern Germany. Fastnacht, mostly used in Swabia, is also used in Mainz. Karneval is a newer, more recent (17th century), Latin-based word. It probably comes from carne levare (“away with meat”), relating to Catholic LentCarnevale in Venice, Italy is one of the earliest documented carnival celebrations in the world. It featured still-popular traditions, incl. parades and masks. Gradually the Italian Carnevale customs spread North to other Catholic countries. including France. From there, it came to the Rheinland and elsewhere. The 3rd common term for carnival, Fastnacht, refers to the Swabian-Alemannic version, which differs somewhat from Fasching and Karneval, and is found in Baden-Württemberg, Franken (Northern Bavaria), and Hessen. Fasching is used in Bavaria, Berlin, Brandenburg, Sachsen. We sometimes call it the “5th season”. 

Starting Date
Although many carnival organizations traditionally begin their official activities on November 11 (11/11) at 11:11 a.m., the real starting date for Karneval or Fasching activities is usually January 6 (Epiphany). It is only following the Christmas and New Year’s season that carnival preparation really gets underway. Organizations begin planning balls and building floats. If there are any events on Nov 11, they are brief and only serve as a mini pre-carnival. Very little happens between Nov 12 and Jan 5. No matter the name, almost all carnival observances end at midnight on Shrove Tuesday. The next day, Ash Wednesday, is the official start of Lent, even if very few people today actually fast until Easter. Historically, the purpose of carnival was to live it up before the start of Lent and its 40 days of gustatory sacrifice.

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Taken from the Byzantine Missal for Sundays and Feast Days with Rites of Sacraments, and Various Offices and Prayers by Rev. Fr. Joseph Raya of the Patriarchal Clergy of Antioch, Alexandria and Jerusalem, and Baron José de Vinck; published at Birmingham, Alabama, by St. George’s R. C. Byzantine Church in 1958, having been printed at Tournai, Belgium, by Société Saint Jean l’ Evangéliste, Desclée & Cie.

Ash Wednesday – 1 March 2017

Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent, the season of preparation for the resurrection of Jesus Christ on Easter Sunday.   (In Eastern Rite Catholic churches, Lent begins two days earlier, on Clean Monday.)

Ash Wednesday always falls 46 days before Easter.   While Ash Wednesday is not a Holy Day of Obligation, all Roman Catholics are encouraged to attend Mass on this day in order to mark the beginning of the Lenten season.

The Distribution of Ashes

During Mass, the ashes which give Ash Wednesday its name are distributed.  The ashes are made by burning the blessed palms that were distributed the previous year on Palm Sunday; many churches ask their parishioners to return any palms that they took home so that they can be burned.   After the priest blesses the ashes and sprinkles them with holy water, the faithful come forward to receive them. The priest dips his right thumb in the ashes and, making the Sign of the Cross on each person’s forehead, says, “Remember, man, that thou art dust, and to dust thou shalt return” (or a variation on those words).

A Day of Repentance

The distribution of ashes reminds us of our own mortality and calls us to repentance. In the early Church, Ash Wednesday was the day on which those who had sinned and who wished to be readmitted to the Church, would begin their public penance.   The ashes that we receive are a reminder of our own sinfulness and Catholics should leave them on their foreheads all day as a sign of humility.

Fasting and Abstinence Are Required

The Church emphasises the penitential nature of Ash Wednesday by calling us to fast and abstain from meat.   Catholics who are over the age of 18 and under the age of 60 are required to fast, which means that they can eat only one complete meal and two smaller ones during the day, with no food in between.   Catholics who are over the age of 14 are required to refrain from eating any meat, or any food made with meat, on Ash Wednesday.

Taking Stock of Our Spiritual Life

This fasting and abstinence is not simply a form of penance, however; it is also a call for us to take stock of our spiritual lives.   As Lent begins, we should set specific spiritual goals we would like to reach before Easter and decide how we will pursue them—for instance, by going to daily Mass when we can and receiving the Sacrament of Confession more often.

anonymous asked:

Hi, I have two questions about being Catholic. First, is there any special way Catholics start their prayers with? Like with the Sign of the Cross? Second, when you become a Catholic how do you get a rosary? Do you just buy one yourself?

Hello!

These are great questions!

We begin and end our prayers with the Sign of the Cross, which is also a prayer by itself. “In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.” We touch our foreheads when we say Father, our hearts when we say Son, our left shoulder when we say Holy, and our right shoulder when we say Spirit. (I also heard that Eastern Catholics go from the right shoulder to the left.) When we say Amen, some of us make a cross with the thumb and index finger of our right hand and kiss it.

There’s an extended form of the Sign of the Cross that I’ve only heard in Spanish:

“Por la Señal de la Santa Cruz, de nuestros enemigos, líbranos Señor Dios Nuestro. En el nombre del Padre y del Hijo y del Espíritu Santo. Amén.”

In English, it’s this:
“By the Sign of the Holy Cross, from our enemies, deliver us, O Lord our God. In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.”

When we say “By the Sign of the Holy Cross”, we cross our foreheads so that the Gospel is in our mind. When we say “From our enemies”, we cross our lips so that the Gospel is on our lips. When we say “Deliver us, O Lord our God”, we cross our hearts so that the Gospel is in our hearts. Then we cross ourselves the way I described in the first paragraph. We actually cross ourselves the longer way before we hear the Gospel during Mass (but we say “Glory to You, O Lord”). I often cross myself this way outside of Mass, too.

I received my first Rosary before I even decided to convert. I ordered a free one online from America Needs Fatima (Now that they have my address, they mail me twice a month, but I really like them, so it’s okay.). Not too long after that I bought one on Amazon. By then I had already decided to convert. Some parishes and organizations like ANF give them away and some people make their own, but you can also buy them online. I buy mine on Amazon and they have a pretty good selection there. I heard that some people receive them as gifts from RCIA sponsors. There are many ways to get a Rosary.

I hope that I helped! If you have more questions, feel free to ask.

Ad Jesum per Mariam,
María de Fátima

theatrix-the-goddess  asked:

hey, if i were to write a jewish character, how should i go about it?

WHOOO BOY

Fair Warning: This is going to be a long post.

Personally, I’m an Orthodox Ashkenazi, so most of my characters are Ashkenazis who are at least Modern Orthodox. HOWEVER, not all Jews are Ashkenazi so…. 

Religiosity:

 **CRASH COURSE IN JUDAISM TIME** 

I’m going to use Christianity as an example because I assume the majority of people who will read this are Christian. In Christianity there are different sects that believe different things (Catholic, Lutherans, Irish Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Mormons, etc). 

In Judaism there are also different sects only most of them don’t believe in something different than the others unless they’re an offshoot of Ashkenz (which I will get into in a moment). Each of these sects is mainly based on where you or your family are from geographically. If you’re from Spain you are most likely a Sephardi or Anusim Jew. If you are North African (Moroccan, Libyan, Tunisian) then its likely you are also Sephardi. (For anyone interested, Sephardi means in English “of Sephard” Sephard is Spain in Hebrew). If you are from Ethiopia, you are most likely an Ethiopian Jew. From Iran you are most likely a Persian Jew. Anywhere else in the Middle East you are most likely a Mizrachi Jew. If from Yemen then you are a Temani Jew. These are just usual rules to live by. 

If you are from anywhere in Europe (Mainly France, Germany, or Russia) besides Spain then you are most likely an Ashkenazi Jew. The reason that Ashkenazi Jews are a little different than other sects though is a simple reason. 

***CRASH COURSE IN JEWISH HISTORY TIME*** 

In the 1800s European Jews got Emancipated. This meant that Jews were allowed to leave their gated communities (shtettles, though there were plenty ghettos too) and join in with regular society. Since (and @ jumblr correct me if i’m wrong) this only happened in Europe during modern times (1400s) only the Ashkenazi Jews were really affected. So as Jews began to integrate into society many of them began to lose their religiosity. So the Ashkenazi community freaks out because they have Jews who are suddenly not being religious and they create two communities. Reform and Orthodox. The Reform believed that Emancipation was good and it slowly morphed into what everyone knows as Reform Judaism today. The Orthodox Movement thought that Emancipation was ruining Judaism and they later morphed into what is now called Ultra-Orthodox. Then you had two offshoots of those–Conservative and Neo-Orthodox. I know more about Neo-Orthodoxy so I’ll tell you about that, Neo-Orthodoxy believed that unlike Orthodoxy Emancipation was both good and that mitzvot were good. They ended up becoming the Modern Orthodox Movement (sorta like I am!!). 

The difference between the geographical sects and the Ashkenazi offshoot sects are that the geographical sects don’t necessarily have belief differences (differences in tradition and halacha, sure, but not belief) and the other sects do. Since then there have been other offshoots of Ashkenaz (mainly) that have a slightly different belief system as well (Reconstructionist, Renewal, Hassidic, etc). But each of these are different in tradition and halacha because of their belief not because of their teachers. 

Now, friendly reminder that geography doesn’t always work for identifying a Jew’s denomination. I have friends who are Sephardi and have no relation to Spain. There are Jews who do have Spanish decent and are Ashkenazi. It is a good base, but not a law. 

When creating a character figuring out what denomination of Judaism they are is important, as figuring this out is an added character trait and usually very important to the character themselves. 

After you figure out how religious you want them to be I suggest working on their character and seeing how the religion and the rules or miztvot that they follow merge. Remember, Jews are people too and if you are writing a Jew just write a person only with like… Kosher and Yom Kippur (or not if your character doesn’t keep that… whatever).

Traps Writers Fall Into:

There are two big ones:

  • Christian Influence
    • This one is a lot more prominent if the character is in a non-Jewish majority country–which I assume your characters will be, be it America or Britain. 
      • Why, you ask? Well because Secular countries are actually a lot less secular and a lot more Christian than most Christians think. It’s not necessarily a criticism but it is a thing. 
    • Do not, I repeat, do not write your Jewish character like a wannabe-Christian. We are not Wannabe-Christians. If we were then we wouldn’t be Jewish. Not every Jew grows up wanting a Christmas Tree or dressed up for Halloween. Not every kid secretly wants to eat a cheeseburger or go into a church.
      • Jews complain when they don’t get representation, they may love the twinkle lights during the Holidays but they are annoyed that there are no Hannukah decorations in the stores or that every chocolate in Spring is a bunny. We are not Wannabes.
  • Over using Yiddish
    • NOT!!! EVERY!!! JEW!!! SPEAKS!! YIDDISH!!
    • And certainly not every Jew speaks the amount of Yiddish that non-Jewish writers use. Most Ashkenazi Jews speak a mixture of Hebrew and Yiddish slang with a base of English. We’ll say “shelp,” “spritz,” and “gavult.” We’ll also say “stam,” “davka,” and “baruch hashem.” But our base language is usually English. We don’t all have Yiddish accents, we aren’t all New Yorkers. 
    • Also, Yiddish is not the only Jewish language!
      • There is another one called Ladino which is a mix of Spanish and Hebrew, and while it is dying out there still are some speakers. If you have a Jew of Hispanic decent you might want to use that instead of Yiddish. 

Now Let’s Talk Pet Peeves:

I have many Pet Peeves about Jews in Media so let’s start with the most obvious.

1. Jewish Holidays are ignored when they don’t fall out on Christian Ones

It sucks and it’s true. Most of our holidays when not Hannukah and Rosh Hashana are almost never mentioned. Jews have many more holidays than just those two. Like…

  • Jews have like… six fast days. All of them are important but most Jews ignore some of the shorter ones because they fall out on regular work days and it isn’t good to fast while at work.
    • fasting also means fasting. We do not eat unless necessary for health, we do not drink unless necessary for health. And for two of those fast days we have four other restrictions as well. 
  • We have Purim. Purim is a pretty cool holiday with a backstory like most Jewish holidays, someone tried to kill us, we won, let’s eat. 
    • Which contrary to popular belief is not Halloween only Jews.
  • Sukkot
    • A great holiday in which we eat outside and shake a bunch of leaves and a nice smelling fruit (which the TSA must be informed about every year so they don’t hold Jews in Airport Jail for carrying a bunch of palm leaves. I shit you not, this happens every year and it gets funnier every time). There’s other stuff to but that would take longer to explain. 

etc…

2. Jews almost never marry Jews in Media

This actually happens a lot more than in real life. You have a Jewish character, doesn’t matter if they’re religious or not, they almost never marry Jews. I have only ever watched two shows where two Jewish characters married (or were close to it). These are Will & Grace (Grace and Leo), and a show called Saving Hope where the lesbian Jew gets with a lesbian Jew and moves to Tel Aviv (Doctor Katz). 

3. Women and Jewish Marriage

These two topics are treated very badly in media. People tend not to understand what a K’Tuba (Jewish Marriage licence) is, and what it means to Jewish Women. It means we more or less have all power in the relationship. Where Saving Hope is good on the non-intermarriage issue, it sucks on a heterosexual marriage issue. Women are allowed to say no to sex, they are allowed to incite sex, if they do not want sex with their partner their partner cannot have sex with them

Alternatively if either partner wants a get (a Jewish divorce) then the partner must give them one. Something usually ignored is that if the woman wants a get not only does her husband have to give her one the Jewish community is obligated to alienate him from them, personally and business-wise, and treat him as though he has a contagious disease. A Jew is allowed to do almost anything to the unwilling partner to get them to sign the get (the Torah even says that you can stone him. We don’t obviously because killing is wrong and etc. There is a lovely story that I heard about a man who wouldn’t give his wife a get and her angry brother and a matza factory but I won’t get into that). This is exemplified in an episode of a show called In Plain Sight (Episode Aguna Matatala), I really like this episode and the Rabbi character. Personally I believe this is one of the best ‘Jew Episodes’ out there. 

4. Not knowing a character is Jewish until it must come up because of a holiday or a death in the family

If your character is Jewish they are Jewish all the time. Only bringing it up when it’s suddenly Christmas and you want diversity is stupid and quite frankly annoying. You cannot erase our Judaism because it does not benefit your plot. 

FRIENDLY REMINDER: ALL JEWS ARE DIFFERENT. 

An Israeli Jew acts differently than a Diaspora Jew, and a Hollywood Jew acts differently than a New York Jew. We aren’t just stereotypes we are people, and if you are making a character be realistic you must keep that in mind. 


That’s it for now. I may add on more guidelines in the future, and if anyone reading this has a Pet Peeve about Jews in Media I urge you to add yours. But please keep this thread respectful. The ask was respectful and I actually really appreciate you asking. 

anonymous asked:

Hi! What is your opinion on someone who is 14 fasting for a prayer intention? I asked my religion teacher, but she assumed that I was doing it to lose weight, (as if a teenager can't be mature enough to want something to bring themselves closer to God). I follow the "three meals to one..." rule, and I stop if I'm feeling distracted/faint, but is there an actual teaching? Or an opinion? Thanks, God bless!! 💖💖

Hello!

“For members of the Latin Catholic Church, the norms on fasting are obligatory from age 18 until age 59. Members of the Eastern Catholic Churches are to observe the particular law of their own sui iuris Church” (USCCB).

It is not required since you’re 14, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t do it. Make sure you are healthy enough to fast. Fasting for a prayer intention really is a nice thing to do.

If you are able to fast, go ahead! God bless!

Ad Jesum per Mariam,

María de Fátima

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Happy Christmas Eve to my friends who follow the old calendar!

January 7 is Christmas Day for Russian Christians, the Jerusalem Orthodox Church, the Serbian Orthodox Church, the Georgian Orthodox Church, the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, as well as for some Protestants who use the Julian calendar. According to the Julian calendar, the holidays come thirteen days after the Christmas festivities in the Catholic Church.

Cathedral of Saint Elie & Saint Gregory The Illuminator - Beirut, Lebanon

anonymous asked:

so marthy whats up with the eastern church not recognizing the pope as the successor to saint peter? isn't that heretical?

As long as we’re painting broad strokes with the brush of discord☺️why did Rome think it had the authority to prohibit Eastern Catholic communities in North America, South America, and Australia from fully exercising their traditions by banning the practice of ordaining married priests? An act which resulted in the destabilization of countless Eastern Catholic communities and caused thousands to leave the faith. An act which first took place in America in 1890 and was only lifted in 2014, but even now Eastern Catholic bishops still have an “obligation to inform before hand” the local Roman Catholic bishop. Not just as a courtesy like “hey fam I ordained a dude”, but _obligated_ to do so _before_ “in order to have his opinion regarding any useful information.” Like? ?? Do Roman Catholic bishops do that? Do they write the Metropolitan and ask for his opinion? I didn’t look it up but I’m gonna guess no???

Now, I don’t want to make a broad claim about Eastern Christians but here I go: most of them that I know don’t have a problem believing the Pope is Peter’s successor, their problem is often the fact that Rome has a habit of overstepping its boundaries (see prohibiting the ordination of married priest in the New World) and micromanaging the Eastern Churches under the guise of “primacy” and the belief that the Pope is some kind of King who’s in charge of all the Churches instead of first among equal Patriarchs and I’m inclined to agree fam. I think a better statement would be that most Eastern Christians don’t believe the office of Pope as it is currently regarded by Roman Catholics is how one ought to regard the office. And if you believe that then I don’t think it’s heretical at all.

April 23 - New Sunday

 - Second Sunday of the Season of Resurrection


“A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, ‘Peace be with you.’
Then he said to Thomas, ‘Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.’
Thomas answered him, ‘My Lord and my God!’
Jesus said to him, ‘Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.’
Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book.
But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name.”

 - Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 20:26-31