east baghdad

Iraqi-Assyrian Christians attend Mass inside the Our Lady of Salvation/Deliverance Syriac Catholic Church - Baghdad, Iraq

March 11, 1917 - Fall of Baghdad

Pictured - Maude enters the city of the caliphs.

The Allied war against the Turks had swung favorably. British and Imperial forced gained momentum at the beginning of 1917, overrunning Ottoman outposts near Gaza and then, in Mesopotamia, the ancient Persian capital of Ctesiphon. The ultimate objective of Britain’s Palestine campaign was Jerusalem, on March 11 they completed another historic victory to the east when Baghdad fell.

The last Turkish defenders, under Khalil Pasha, evacuated the city that day, ceding it to 45,000 triumphant British and Indian troops, who entered the city with General Maude riding at their head. German officers blew up the radio station before they left, although the British did capture six brand new airplanes, freshly delivered to the Turks.

The Imperial soldiers entering the ancient city received a bewildering reception: “Persians dressed like Joseph in long silken coats of many colours; red-fezzed oriental Jews in misfit European clothing; handsome Armenian refugees who had spent the night huddled in Christian churches, fearful of their fate if any of the fleeing Turks learned of their existence; lordly turbaned Muslims in black flowing robes - all turned out to cheer them as they tramped in through the Southern Gate. It was a gala display a fiesta - something that had not taken place when Townshend’s men had tottered painfully through the same streets.” Townshend’s forces had been captured at Kut the year before and led on a painful death march to Anatolia, where those who survived still languished.

Englishmen ignorant of history must have been astounded by the city, but others far off reckoned the symbolic value of their victory. “That’s the end of the German dream of domination in the Near East,” recorded British orientalist Gertrude Bell. “Their place is not going to be in the sun.”

So people are dying in the Middle East, but the global media do not give a shit about Arabs unless we are involved in any “terrorist” related news. Two days ago a terrorist attack occurred on a busy shopping mall in Baghdad, that ended up killing at least 200 innocent people, followed by terrorist attacks today in Saudi Arabia. I don’t see the Iraqi/Saudi flag all over the social media, I don’t see the “pray for <insert a white country here> “? 

If the world doesn’t look at us and see us as the humans we are, then fuck you all 

The atrocities in Brussels happen almost daily on the streets of Baghdad, Aleppo and Damascus. Western missiles and Isis bombs kill more innocents in a week than die in Europe in a year. The difference is the media response. A dead Muslim is an unlucky mutt in the wrong place at the wrong time. A dead European is front-page news.
—  Simon Jenkins, ‘The scariest thing about Brussels is our reaction to it’, The Guardian
Cities of Mesopotamia

Baghdad (بغداد‎) - Iraq

Al-Raqqah (الرقة) - Syria

Basra (البصرة‎) - Iraq

Deir ez-Zor (دير الزور) - Syria

Fallujah (الفلوجة‎) - Iraq

Hesice ( Hesîçe‎  ܚܣܟܗ) - Kurdistan/Assyria

Karbala (كربلاء‎) - Iraq

Mardin (Mêrdîn ܡܶܪܕܺܝܢ‎) Kurdistan/Assyria

Mosul (الموصل‎) - Iraq

Najaf (النجف‎) - Iraq

Qamislo (Qamişlo‎ ܩܡܫܠܐ) - Kurdistan/Assyria

Ramadi (الرمادي‎) - Iraq

Tikrit (تكريت‎) - Iraq

Al-Mustansiriya University - Baghdad, Iraq

The university was established in 1963 on the site of the Mustansiriya Madrasah which dated back to 1227 CE