dead chicken jokes are old and unfunny now, pls drop it. don’t send me any more asks about it. it was funny at first to joke about shoma having no fashion sense but it’s gotten to the point where there’s more focus on his costumes than his skating. i honestly don’t care what he wears at worlds, i just want him to skate well. i don’t agree with all his decisions but at least i can recognize he’s his own person and can make his own decisions.

also this twitter thread sums up my feelings about the skating fandom’s recent tendency to treat shoma like a little kid. it’s a good read and i recommend it for everyone. i have personally called myself his “mom” before and i think this has exacerbated the problem, and i will try to avoid this kind of vocabulary in the future. in my case, i feel protective of him because i have literally watched him since he was 12, and have followed his journey for the past 6 years. i am also some years older than him. it may be hard sometimes for me to believe he’s grown up, but the fact is that he is 19 now, a legal adult in most of the world, and should be treated as such. the fact that he looks young is no excuse to still talk about him like he’s 10 (and tbh, even if he WERE 10, that’s still no excuse to be creepy). basically just…stop infantilizing shoma. watch how you speak. remember skaters are actual people and not a collection of tropes to blow out of proportion.

this has been a PSA

anonymous asked:

peridot is east asian actually im pretty sure

the show has been very clear with its coding so far so i doubt it but even if she was then top kek cause they infantilized an asian woman 

sharpington  asked:

when you reblogged that face tutorial you mentioned you rarely see your hairline depicted in art--which hairline is that? I've never thought to pay attention to them before

Hey hey!! I’m so glad you posed this question!!

Hairlines aren’t really extensively talked about in terms of design, and I find that people just tend to use the same old ‘rounded’ or ‘squared-off’ hairlines when designing characters, ignoring the fact that natural hairlines are just as diverse as our other facial features. We lack proper language to describe them, and outside of the black natural hair community, people often don’t give hairlines a thought until they start to go bald. This problem with lack of terminology actually made it hard for me to find good reference for you!!

My hairline actually isn’t that rare in East Asian ethnicities, yet because it’s undesirable and doesn’t conform to beauty standards, no one ever depicts it in art save for a very select few that make it a part of their distinct style. The two artists that immediately come to my mind are illustrators Hayashi Seiichi and He Jiaying. Here is an excerpt from a Hayashi illustration:

And one from He Jiaying:

(He’s illustrations actually helped me come to love my hairline, after years of hiding it and being ashamed of it. Nowdays I don’t stare at my hairline in the mirror, feeling insecure and self-conscious, fervently wishing I could make my baby hairs grow thicker. I now rock a bun nearly daily. Representation matters!!)

My hairline was once described to me as ‘a variation of the classic straight’- though it looks normal when my hair is down, when it’s pulled up, two sharp triangles of baby hair immediately make themselves distinctly visible, too short to get pulled back along with the rest. These two patches right above the temples are thin and fluffy, different in texture to the rest of the scalp.

Here are some examples I yanked from the internet. Pay attention to how the patches of baby hair are visible only when the hair is pulled back:

You can even see it in some of the selfies I’ve posted onto tumblr, lmao!! (#truffs face) My mother, grandmother and both blood related aunts (all entirely Korean) share this hairline with me. It’s entirely genetic, very common and nothing we should be ashamed of.

Now that I’ve embraced my hairline, whenever I draw myself or my characters who share this trait, I tend to deliberately draw in these patches of thinner hair, making sure to pay attention to the directional pull of the strands and visually communicate that it’s less full in these areas. I know my own insecurity made me hyper-aware of hairlines since youth, and normally people don’t pay attention to them at all. But I still objectively feel that they are an important feature of how a head is designed overall, and mine is a distinct physical aspect of myself, and I want people to know that I LOVE my hairline and I know that it’s worth being represented!!

Female Korean-American Teenager

Hi, I’m Caroline, and as the title states, I’m a female Korean-American teen currently living in a town that’s 80% white. The majority of East Asians living here are Japanese, and over the years, there have been a few sprinklings of new Korean or Chinese families moving in. For the most part, however, my family was the only Korean family in town when we first came here. This heavily impacted my childhood - made me ashamed of my culture and ethnicity - and of course, the racism that I constantly faced from classmates, parents, teachers, and sometimes even friends, was exhausting. 

It means so much to me to see Korean-American characters - or any person of color, really - be represented in today’s books, TV shows, movies, etc. For once, I’d like to see fully-fleshed out, complex characters who are people of color - not just the 2D stereotypes that too many forms of media put them out to be. So if a few more writers out there become less ignorant due to this post, I’ll be forever grateful. 

So. Let’s do this thing!

Beauty Standards 

Most East Asians represented in today’s media have extremely straight, practically black hair. And while it’s true that straight, black hair is the most common trait regarding hair amongst Koreans, there are (*gasp*) a few of us with curly hair, too. (Moi.) To the Koreans I knew, anyways, my hair was always an object of envy. I’d frequently be asked if I got the perm, and whenever I said I had naturally curly hair, there’d be a lot of “oh, how lucky"s going around. That made me feel pretty special, only it’d last for a short while before the reality of living in a mostly-white neighborhood kicked in, where my curly hair was usually made fun of. (Usually saying that Asians don’t have curly hair. Whatever. On the whole scale of racist comments I’ve been sent, the one about my hair is the least bothersome. When I was a kid, it bothered me a lot, though, and I think to some extent, it still bothers me at least a teeny bit - I actually started to straighten my hair when I went into eighth grade. Yup, give me the Hypocrite of the Year Award. I still need some adjustments.) 

Amongst Koreans, there’s also a lot of emphasis on having a small face, long and skinny legs, a fairly short torso…essentially, Koreans thrive for the typical European figure. Koreans, however, have pretty round faces, short and stalky legs, and long torsos for the most part. (With the exception of a few - and of course, the option for plastic surgery is always out there. I shit you not, almost every Korean woman I know have at least either (a) known someone who went through plastic surgery or (b) have been in plastic surgery myself. It’s a big deal in South Korea. My grandma had surgery done to her eyes twice, my mom’s friend had surgery done to her nose and her eyes, and my aunt’s brother is actually a plastic surgeon who does operations a number of times a day.) 

Clothing 

Growing up, I wore the typical American clothing - except for on special occasions, like my first birthday or New Year’s. On those days, I’d wear a hanbok, which is a traditional Korean gown with lots of colors and embroidery. The men would wear traditional clothing as well, and it’s customary for Koreans to wear these especially on New Year’s. Now, since my brothers and I have outgrown our hanboks, we just stick to American clothes on New Year’s. 

Daily Struggles 

Though I tell all my white friends and classmates that my first language is English, my first language was actually Korean. I don’t say that my first language is Korean anymore because firstly, I don’t want people to think of me as someone who only speaks Korean and secondly, I don’t know how to speak Korean anymore. It’s sad, really, because I can understand Korean much better than my siblings and my cousins, and there are moments when I can almost remember a phrase, but as of now, speaking the language is an extreme difficulty and embarrassment to me, especially when I’m surrounded by elders. (And usually, the only things I can say to them are ‘hello’ and ‘thank you’ and ‘goodbye’.) It’s frustrating to speak to older Koreans and know exactly what they’re saying but only being able to respond in English. 

That being said, growing up, I often had to translate - more specifically, re-translate - for my mother, who didn’t know English at all when I was a child. She used to feel incredibly lonely for it, and often times, she’d feel frustrated and cry about how all of the white mothers acted like she was an idiot for not knowing English. As an extreme social butterfly, this really hurt my mother, and it hurt her even more when her own children were starting to distance themselves because of the language barrier. I remember having to sit with my mother on the couch and help her learn English - and it was, to be honest, one of the saddest experiences I’ve ever had to go through. She’d grow frustrated with herself, and she’d hate every bit of it, I could tell, but she kept going because she wanted to be there for her kids. (She eventually got her American citizenship, too, but by doing so, she had to give up her Korean citizenship. Most East Asian countries don’t allow dual citizenships.) And though I don’t speak Korean anymore, I actually continue to re-translate things for my mother - in other words, I just have to simplify the English a little bit to get her to understand what someone else is saying. (This method works for anyone else who is struggling with English. Simplify the words, that’s all - but don’t treat the person with disrespect.) 

And, of course, there’s the very exhausting series of questions that come with being Korean. The most annoying and frustrating are (but not limited to) - 

  • “Oh, so are you South Korean or North Korean?” (Bruh. If I was North Korean, there’s a VERY slim chance I’d be in America right now. I’d still be stuck in North Korea, wouldn’t I?) 
  • “But what’s your nationality?” (American.) “No, I mean your REAL nationality.“ 
  • “What are you? Japanese? Chinese? Vietnamese?” (For some reason, NO ONE GUESSES KOREAN.) 
  • “Wow, your English is great!” (???) 
  • “English is your best subject? Wait, then what about math?” (…) 
  • “I bet you’re super smart!” (…I study hard, yeah, but that has nothing to do with the fact that I’m Korean.) 
  • “Oh, my God, Koreans are SO hot.” (Ew. Times a thousand.) 

Dating and Relationships 

My parents are pretty strict about my nonexistent love life. If my dad had it his way, I wouldn’t be allowed to date until I’m out of college. But for real talk, my mom’s actually the one who’s much pickier on who I date. She told me since I was a kid that it’d be best for me to date (and marry) another Korean-American. She means this out of the goodness of her heart - mostly that she wants me to marry someone who I can connect with culturally. (“Regular Koreans will be too grounded into Korea. You need someone with similar experiences.”) My dad just doesn’t want me to date anyone Japanese - and while I find this wrong, it’s mostly due to the bad blood between Korea and Japan. (World War II, the Korean War, comfort women, etc.) 

And because of this prejudice against Japanese people, my dad always found it difficult to accept that I had a few Japanese friends. He often wanted me to stray away from other Eastern-Asians in general, American or not. (Unless, of course, it was for dating/marrying.) This was because he didn’t want me to become a part of “THAT Asian group”, which, let me just say, is pretty sad, because when there’s a group of white kids hanging around, no one finds it strange. When there’s a big group of x friends of x race, it’s suddenly SUCH an odd sight. 

Food 

This is where I try to restrain myself for real. 

The most common foods you’ll find at a Korean dinner table are rice, kimchi (which is basically spicy pickled cabbage - lots of Koreans eat it, but I personally never did. And I still don’t. Oops), kim (pronounced keem - basically roasted and dried, slightly salted seaweed strips. Which are really good), along with a number of side-dishes and maybe one big, main dish. (Mostly meat.) 

Favorite Korean dishes include

  • seolleongtang, a lightly salted broth with oxtail meat, or sometimes some other kind of meat. There’s usually a sprinkling of scallions, and rice or noodles can be served inside. 
  • kalbi, the famous Korean BBQ. Just imagine meat being prepared directly in front of you served with veggies. Delicious, but be warned - your burps will stink - and I mean stink - afterwards. Its variant, kalbi jim, are slow-cooked short ribs served often with Korean-style steamed potatoes and carrots. Just as good. 
  • tangsuyuk, sweet and sour (mostly sweet, I think, anyways,) pork. The pork is covered with a batter that is fried and then typically dunked in sweet sauce. Some people like to have the sauce on the side so they can dip it in - and still save the crunch. It’s a personal preference. 
  • buchimgae, otherwise known as Kimchi Pancakes. Korean pancakes are not your typical breakfast pancakes. They’re made in a pan, like regular breakfast pancakes, but inside, there’s an assortment of seafood, veggies, and in this version, kimchi. (There are spicy and non-spicy versions). 
  • tteokbokki, spicy rice cakes. Very chewy and again, pretty spicy. 

Favorite Korean sweets/desserts/snacks include 

  • tteok, sweet rice cakes. There are many different kinds of rice cake, usually with flavors of classical red bean or green tea. The favorite of many children is the classical rainbow tteok, where the rice cakes are dyed with strips of green, pink, and yellow. The flavor of plain tteok is actually not too sweet, but it’s still a very classic, very traditional and cultural Korean dessert that cannot be skipped over. 
  • yakbap, a very special type of sweet rice cake all on its own. This is a favorite amongst many, and the rice is prepared in a way that it’s sticky and brown. Pine nuts, chestnuts, and jujubes as well as raisins are mixed in. 
  • patbingsu, a frozen dessert. Think of an evolved form of shave ice with toppings like red bean paste, nuts, and fruit. Extremely popular in South Korea, not to mention one of its most iconic desserts. 
  • saeoosnek, shrimp-flavored crackers. Again, a very popular snack that’s exactly what it sounds like. Crackers. With. Shrimp. Flavoring. 
  • choco pie, a popular chocolate-marshmallow cake that looks similar to America’s moon pie. Extremely popular amongst children. 

Holidays 

In my family, we never celebrated the direct Korean celebrations, but we always celebrated the Korean New Year the traditional way. Again, usually dressed in hanbok, children (and parents) would bow down to the oldest members of the family and pay their respects with a traditional phrase. They also have to perform a special bow three times while saying this phrase. (There are two different bows - one for men, one for women.) Once doing so, the elder usually gives a blessing to the family members and presents them with an envelope of money, very similar to the traditional Chinese red envelope they receive on their New Year’s celebration. 

Another traditional Korean celebration my family - and many other Korean families, I’m sure - celebrate is the 100 Days birthday. 

A brief history lesson - back when Korea was suffering due to the economy failing, it was a rare occurrence to ever see a child live past one hundred days. Once one hundred days had passed, then the family would rejoice and throw a large celebration, inviting friends, extended family members. There’d be lots of food and laughter and different rituals all dedicated to the child. Now, of course, Korea’s economic situation is not the same as it was back then, but we still hold these celebrations for tradition and cultural reasons. 

One of the most important rituals in the 100 Days birthday is sitting the baby down in front of a variety of items - usually a coin, a pen, a length of twine, a book, food, and sometimes other variants of those items. If the child picks up a coin, then it is to be predicted that this child will live a wealthy life. If the child picks up a pen or a book, then it is to be predicted that this child will grow to become a scholar. If the child picks up food, then it is to be predicted that this child will never go hungry. If the child picks up the length of twine (or sometimes string or a spool of thread), then it is to be predicted that this child will live a long life. Some families believe in this, others don’t, but either way, this ritual is performed because hey, tradition! (And besides, it makes for pretty cute pictures.) 

Home/Family Life 

Korean families and Korean home-life, I feel, will always have a different atmosphere from white families. Most Korean parents are very reserved when it comes to public displays of affection for their children, though like all families, this can vary. Independence and learning how to grow an outer shell is very important to the Korean lifestyle. This doesn’t mean that Korean parents don’t love their children - of course they do, and again, all Korean families work differently. However, this pattern and discipline is a common thing to find in most Korean families. 

There’s a certain emphasis on studying - and no, not all Korean parents are super strict about grades and threaten to beat their children if they get a B on a report card. (At least, my parents didn’t.) However, education is still considered a top priority. Studying is encouraged, and most Korean parents want to see their children secure a good job (ie doctor, lawyer, engineer, etc). Most of the time, Korean parents just want to see their children live a secured life. That’s it. At least, with my parents, everything they ever taught me or told me had something to do with me learning to survive when I become older. I used to resent this when I was a kid, but now that I’ve grown more mature, I actually find myself appreciating everything my parents have ever taught me. 

Another note - when a Korean woman marries, she is cut off from her birth family and is considered to only be a part of her husband’s family. This limits her visits to her own birth family - and though this was a common thing before, I believe many Korean families don’t operate the same way anymore. (Some traditions last longer than others.) 

Elders are respected. Period. Even if s/he’s getting on your nerves, you ALWAYS RESPECT THE ELDERS. 

Shoes are taken off before entering a house. No exceptions to this rule. If you wanna impress your Korean friend, take off your damn shoes. This will be appreciated. 

Things I’d like to see less of. 

  • people thinking that “all Koreans get hot when they’re older”. (FETISHIZATION IS A BIG NO-NO.)
  • Koreans being seen as submissive and docile creatures. (Note how I said creatures and not humans. Because that’s how some people treat Koreans and other East Asians. Like we’re creatures, rather than actual human beings.) 
  • Koreans being seen as kickass ninjas. (It’s either docile creatures or kickass ninjas. There’s never a line between the two, and it’s exhausting.) 
  • “Koreans are so romantic!” (Sorry, that’s the K-drama binge talking. If anything, Koreans are pretty reserved when it comes to PDA and again, affection in general. Of course, I can’t speak for all Koreans, but at least with my family, PDA was always kept to a minimum. Usually a quick peck on the lips, kisses on the cheek, hand-holding, etc. Never an actual full kiss in public. Forget about make-out sessions.) 
  • Stone-cold Koreans. (Again, there’s either the romantic Korean or the Terminator Korean. Never an in-between. Yes, keep in mind that due to cultural reasons, Koreans don’t typically display affection. THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT WE DON’T DISPLAY EMOTIONS.) 
  • Straight-A Koreans. Typically good at math and science. (While yes, many East Asian countries and families put emphasis on these subjects, not all Koreans happen to be extreme nerds who cry at a B on a report card. Example A - I happen to stink at math. And I know many other Asian-Americans who also stink at math. So.) 
  • Assuming Korean parents are abusive. (While there are many abusive Korean parents out there, people need to stop assuming that right off the bat. Stop. It’s extremely disrespectful, not to mention just wrong?!) 

Things i’d like to see more of. 

  • complex, well-rounded Korean characters. (Give me a Korean character who hates math but still tries to do well in class. Give me a Korean character who’s bisexual and surrounded by loving family members. Give me a Korean character who likes roller-skating and getting high in the bathroom stalls and sings Jackson 5 all day. Give me a Korean character who goes out to be homecoming queen and buffs her nails while fighting demons. Give me a Korean character who cries, laughs, talks, breathes, LIVES like an actual human being, and you’ll get the respect of hundreds - maybe thousands - of readers and viewers who’ve been waiting for so long to be properly represented.) 
FINN JONES KILLED IT. HANDS DOWN.FIGHT ME.

I loved Iron Fist so much and I honestly do not have any issue with the casting as it was chosen; for once, the Execs made a good decision to actually stay true to the source material.

Hypothetically, though, would it have been cool to have an East Asian person cast as Iron Fist? Of course. I hands down would love to see more diversity in television and cinema as much as anyone else and I totally would have welcomed that if that had happened on this show

But on this particular casting, I feel there are too many people on this site and others projecting themselves and their desires onto everyone else to the point of bullying. And that is majorly uncool and unfair.

Seriously, give the show a chance. So many people poured their hearts, souls,time, and money into it. Judge it after you’ve seen it and formed your own opinions and if you still think Jones was poorly cast, THEN you can bitch.  But I doubt that anyone of you will be complaining much after….

jamietrosa  asked:

Writing a third-gen Chinese-American, living in NYC. She's intelligent, confident, outgoing, ambitious, a little Type A, determined to have a successful business career, but also a bit romantic at heart. I'd like to know what racial stereotypes she might have to bulldoze, dodge around, or grit her teeth at, in a business or college setting - beyond the obvious "mistaking her for a Dragon Lady/submissive schoolgirl" bs. Any thoughts?

Asian American women and stereotyping/microaggressions

I’m second-gen, but here are some you might want to consider:

  • people assuming she’s foreign (“your English is really good!” “so when did you come to the United States?”)
  • identity policing (e.g. saying she’s not really East Asian because she was raised in the US)
  • having her surname constantly messed up, either written or spoken
  • others attributing her intelligence to her race and/or calling her a “bad Asian” when she does a less-than-perfect job on something
  • being mistaken for another East Asian colleague/classmate when they look nothing alike
  • having white people (friends, colleagues, superiors) dismissing her anger at racist actions as ‘overreacting’ and telling her to get over it
  • being called “exotic” or being exoticized by potential suitors

There’s probably more, of course, but those are some I’ve had to deal with as a Chinese American lady.

—mod Jess

Repeat after me:

An Asian person choosing to dye their hair blonde does NOT mean they want to be white

An Asian person choosing to dye their hair blonde does NOT mean they want to be white

AN ASIAN PERSON CHOOSING TO DYE THEIR HAIR BLONDE DOES NOT MEAN THEY WANT TO BE WHITE!!!!

Blonde hair is NOT exclusive to white people, so please STOP it with the mindset that if an Asian person dyes their hair blonde, it must mean they want to be white. I’d like to dye my hair blonde, but it does NOT mean I want to be white!

An Asian person choosing to dye their hair blonde does NOT mean they want to be white

Ravi Zupa - Qilin.

Qilin is a mythical hooved chimerical creature known in Chinese and other East Asian cultures, said to appear with the imminent arrival or passing of a sage or illustrious ruler. It is a good omen thought to occasion prosperity or serenity. It is often depicted with what looks like fire all over its body.

According to legends, it is one of 9 sons of a dragon, which can distinguish between good and evil. It is sometimes included in the list of four noble animals, along with the Chinese dragon, phoenix and tortoise. The mention of this mythical animal goes back to the days of Confucius. Back then, it had a more peaceful appearance. When walking, it did not cause any harm even to insects (like the image of the Lamb in Christian mythology). When stepping on the grass it did not crush it. It fed on magic grasses. It could walk on water and fly. Carved on gravestones, it would protect from evil spirits, as well as accompany the dead to heaven. However, over time it changed its appearance and symbolism - once a symbol of peace and gentleness, it also acquired the features of power and strength.

Ordering Starbucks with a difficult-to-pronounce Chinese name
  • Me: Yes, hi, I'd like a medium passion iced tea.
  • Barista: Is that all?
  • Me: Yup.
  • Barista: Okay, that'll be $2.05.
  • Me: *pays*
  • Barista: What's your name?
  • Me: *stares ominously into the distance as Jaws music plays* Shit shit shit shit shit shit shit what do I do, what do I do, what the fuck do I d-
  • Me: *says English meaning of the first syllable of my name, because I can't teach a phonetics course of my language in under a minute*
  • Me:
  • Me:
  • Me:
  • Me: ...Oh fuck. Did I really just tell that person my name was "Handsome"????
  • Me:
  • Me:
  • Me:
  • Me:
  • Me:
  • Me:
  • Me: I did. Curse me and the next eight generations of my family

TRICKSTER WEEK; day six: east asian

Kitsune is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. According to Yōkai folklore, all foxes have the ability to shape shift into women. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories portray them as faithful guardians, friends, lovers, and wives. Kitsune are often presented as tricksters, with motives that vary from mischief to malevolence. Stories tell of kitsune playing tricks on overly proud samurai, greedy merchants, and boastful commoners, while the crueler ones abuse poor tradesmen and farmers or devout Buddhist monks. Their victims are usually men; women are possessed instead. For example, kitsune are thought to employ their kitsunebi to lead travelers astray in the manner of a will o’ the wisp. Another tactic is for the kitsune to confuse its target with illusions or visions. Other common goals of trickster kitsune include seduction, theft of food, humiliation of the prideful, or vengeance for a perceived slight.


(From Japanese mythology)

8

혼례복 (Bridal Wear) - MyWedding February 2016

Photo: 및 캘리그래피 김보하 

Model: 지이수, 박세진 

Hanbok: 바이단, 박경숙한복, 비단빔, 숙현한복, 우리옷 가비, 우리옷 황후, 윤의한복, 진주상단, 청담채 한복, 한국의상 은유, & 한복 린 

Hair & Makeup: 애브뉴준오(헤어 희린, 메이크업 고진영)

Hundreds of Mexican women came to reside in southeastern China by the early 1930s. Some had migrated there in the first decades of the twentieth century, before the expulsion era, with husbands and companions who chose to move their Mexican-origin families to the communities from which they had emigrated. Wanting to secure entry back into Mexico, Chinese men and their Mexican spouses requested visas from the consulate in Hong Kong and appealed to Manuel Tello, the Mexican consul in Yokohama, Japan. In 1930, Tello wrote to the SRE several times to inquire about whether the men could travel to Mexico with tourist visas but no passports.


María Teresa Guadalajara de Lee had arrived in China with her husband, Eugenio Lee, in the 1920s. She appealed to authorities to repatriate because he had abandoned her and returned to Mexico City by himself in 1926. She remained in China five years later because she had lost her passport and neither Mexican nor Chinese authorities would grant her another one. When she appealed again, the Secretaría de Gobernación (the Mexican government’s internal affairs branch) denied her reentry because she had been away for more than five years. Nevertheless, Mexican authorities tried to help her. They pursued her husband in Mexico to obligate him to pay for his family’s return and provide any documents in his possession. With the help of her brother, Benito Guadalajara, authorities repeatedly looked for Lee, but to no avail. In spite of the lack of documentation, Mexican officials ultimately approved Guadalajara de Lee’s repatriation after her brother acted on her behalf. Federal authorities told local officials in Nogales, Sonora, to permit her and her children to enter Mexico via its border with the United States in the early 1930s.


María Pérez traveled to Guangdong Province with her husband and their children in the spring of 1930. Like Murillo de Chan, she lived in the small community of Kaw Kong. Pérez began appealing to authorities to repatriate to Mexico about a year after she arrived. She was unhappy because her husband had brought her to China “engañada” (under false pretenses), having told her that they were going on a vacation. He had taken out a passport with permission to reenter Mexico within six months and, since it had expired, she and her children could not return. Pérez’s husband had two other spouses in China. After she made known her discontent with the situation, he took her children and threw her out. Though he gave her a very small pension, it was not enough to sustain her. He did, however, agree to pay her passage back to Mexico if she obtained government per-mission to return.


Hundreds more Mexican women would travel to China during the expulsion years. By Fresco’s accounting, more than six hundred Mexican women as well as their Chinese Mexican children arrived in China by 1933, either with the mass expulsions of Chinese men and their families from Sonora and Sinaloa or fleeing anti-Chinese activity in other areas of Mexico. While some women chose to follow their husbands or companions to keep their families together, in other instances authorities simply rounded up the women and sent them out of Mexico along with their partners because mixed-race families were perceived as non-Mexican.

—   “The Women are Neither Chinese Nor Mexican,” Chinese Mexicans: Transpacific Migration and the Search for a Homeland, 1910-1960 by Julia María Schiavone Camacho (2012)