earthquake rescue

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This is “Frida”, she has saved 52 people so far in Mexico’s Earthquake.

A rescue dog who’s helped to save over 50 people trapped in the rubble of Mexico’s earthquake.

Having already save 52 lives during her career, Frida is plunging back into the rubble to find more people.

The six-year-old labrador has been deployed at disasters across Central and North America,  participating in rescue missions in Haiti, Ecuador and Honduras.

Heroes not always wear red capes!.

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Meet Mexico’s unlikely hero: a 7 year old labrador named Frida.

Frida is part of the special Canine Search and Rescue Group that works with the Mexican Marine, and prior to yesterday’s earthquake she had saved 52 lives in Honduras, Ecuador, Haiti, and Oaxaca.
She started her training when she was two years old, and she hasn’t stopped making our country proud ever since.

After the 7.1 earthquake that happened on September 19th, Frida was quick to get to work, and she has been able to rescue 12 lives so far, aside from locating the bodies of more than 20 people.

Rescuers in Mexico City, Morelos, and Puebla need many of the following things as rescues continue after the earthquakes that happened earlier today: air tanks, oxygen tanks, flashlights, and headlamps. There have also been requests for at least 100 additional paramedics.

General emergency response operations activated after the earthquakes will be needing: non-perishable foods, toilet paper, sanitary pads, tampons, soap, bottled water, etc.

If you don’t feel comfortable donating money to the International Red Cross, a reputable organization to donate funds or supplies to is TOPOS, a professional rescue organization operating in Mexico.

Mexico has had our back during disasters like Katrina and Harvey, American friends, let’s show them we have their backs, too!

¡Te amo México!

Meet Frida, the valiant Lab who’s saved dozens of lives in Mexico

One of Mexico’s most beloved rescuers wears wide protective goggles, a harness and two pairs of boots.Frida is the star of the Mexican navy’s Canine Unit. Throughout her career, the 7-year-old Labrador has detected 52 people — 12 alive — in various natural disasters.

She detected the body of a police officer in Juchitan after an earthquake hit the state of Oaxaca two weeks ago.  Now her handlers in Mexico City are hoping she will find survivors of Tuesday’s magnitude 7.1 earthquake, which killed more than 270 people in five states. The quake’s epicenter was in the state of Puebla, about 80 miles southeast of the capital.

Fifteen dogs have been deployed to search for people in Mexico City, but none have as many Twitter admirers as Frida. The navy tweeted a collage of photos of Frida last week, announcing her 52 rescues to the social media world. It got more than 4,000 retweets and nearly 7,000 likes. People called her a symbol of hope, a hero and offered to send her more boots to keep her paws safe. (She and the other rescue dogs have enough.)

Here’s what some of her fans say:

“She should rest a little. She has worked a lot. God take care of you, your work is not easy.”

“Frida for president.”

“Now you know why they say that dogs are man’s best friend.”

Someone even suggested she replace the painter Diego Rivera on the 500-peso note

When Frida’s story went viral this week, many people confused the exact details of her rescues, with some thinking that all 52 people were alive or that all 52 people were detected during the Mexico City earthquake.

Frida was dispatched Tuesday to the collapsed Enrique Rebsamen school, where 11 children were found alive and 25 people, including 19 children, were found dead. Other emergency workers found them.

On Thursday afternoon, she napped in a break room with two Belgian Malinois colleagues, Evil and Echo. Frida’s handler, Israel Arauz Salinas, said she had suffered from exhaustion after searching the school Wednesday. But he said she was back in good spirits Thursday after drinking water with electrolytes and getting some rest.

Salinas said that because of Frida’s age, Evil and Echo, who are a year and a half old, usually go into collapsed buildings first. If they detect a person, Frida follows up to confirm. She usually spends no more than 20 minutes inside.

Salinas said they bark if they detect signs of life. If they find a corpse, they stop suddenly, then carefully proceed.

“They act afraid,” he said. “That indicates to us that there is a cadaver.”

He said the spaces that Frida and the other dogs have had to search are less than 20 inches high. In some places, the dogs had to crawl, getting much deeper into the rubble than rescuers could.

Salinas said the dogs are selected for service at 2 months old. They receive training that determines whether they will go into detection of narcotics, explosives or people.

For detection of people, the training starts by throwing toys such as balls. Once the dog gets used to fetching, the trainer begins running with the toy in hand.

“They start associating the smell of the person with the reward of the ball,” he said, adding that they train for about 3 hours a day for a year before being sent out to disaster sites.

Frida’s skills are applied not only in Mexico. Salinas said she was in Ecuador during the earthquake of April 2016.

By Thursday afternoon at the school in Mexico City, officials said that all children had been accounted for, but that one person might still be alive and trapped inside.

That means there’s still a chance Frida could be sent to find out.

***

source: http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-mexico-earthquake-frida-dog-20170921-story.html

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My Country is in dire need for help, and every bit counts, so i decided to make a Relief pack featuring two of our lovely rescue dogs, Frida and Eco. Please help by buying this stamps, all the revenues will be donated to the Mexican Red Cross and a group of designers at my former school building paramedic equipment.

If you don’t have the money to donate, you will help a lot by reblogging this post!! LINK HERE Please help. Today for me, Tomorrow for you.
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Hero dogs help rescue survivors after Mexico City quake

Rescue dogs joined search teams to look for trapped survivors after the powerful 7.1 earthquake hit Mexico City on Tuesday, killing at least 245 people.

These canine heroes include the goggle-clad Frida, who has reportedly already saved 52 people and stolen hearts across the globe.

Click through the slideshow above to see more of the dogs’ rescue efforts. (Yahoo News)

Photo credits: Edgard Garrido/Reuters, Carlos Cisneros/AP, Dan Trotta/Reuters

See more photos of hero dogs and our other slideshows on Yahoo News.

“When the Man woke up he said 

-What is Wild Dog doing here?- 

And the Woman said 

-His name is not Wild Dog anymore, but First Friend because he will be our friend for always and always and always…-

- Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book
.
Here’s to Frida and all the rescue dogs saving people trapped under the rubble after the earthquake in Mexico 💖 

I’ve been ignoring Frida, and I feel terrible about that. So, in case you haven’t seen photos of Frida, or videos, here she is! Here’s a video:

From Time:

A labrador retriever is earning international praise for her efforts to rescue a dozen lives in various natural disasters following a pair of earthquakes that struck Mexico in recent weeks.

The dog, Frida, is deployed by the Mexican navy (SEMAR) in the event of natural disasters. Equipped with protective goggles and boots, she was put to the test two weeks ago after the Mexican state of Oaxaca was hit by an earthquake, and then again when Mexico City was struck Tuesday. During the former, she was able to locate the body of a Juchitan police officer in the rubble, according to the Los Angeles Times. In total, the 7-year-old has detected the bodies of 52 people throughout her career, 12 of whom are still alive.

Frida is still working with 14 other rescue dogs alongside human workers to locate victims of the 7.1-magnitude Mexico City earthquake, which has left at least 305 dead. But her reputation has spread from her home country to other parts of the world thanks to social media.

And what about the outfit? The goggles protect her eyes from smoke and debris, and the booties protect her feet from digging and walking around all the sharp edges and other stuff on the ground.

With some of her companion rescue dogs:

Rescue workers race to find survivors at collapsed Mexico City school

Hour after excruciating hour, Mexicans were transfixed by dramatic efforts to reach a young girl thought buried in the rubble of a school destroyed by a magnitude 7.1 earthquake. She reportedly wiggled her fingers, told rescuers her name and said there were others trapped near her. Rescue workers called for tubes, pipes and other tools to reach her.

News media, officials and volunteer rescuers all repeated the story of “Frida Sofia” with a sense of urgency that made it a national drama, drawing attention away from other rescue efforts across the quake-stricken city and leaving people in Mexico and abroad glued to their television sets.

But she never existed, Mexican navy officials now say.

“We want to emphasize that we have no knowledge about the report that emerged with the name of a girl,” navy Assistant Secretary Angel Enrique Sarmiento said Thursday. “We never had any knowledge about that report, and we do not believe — we are sure — it was not a reality.”

Sarmiento said a camera lowered into the rubble of the Enrique Rebsamen school showed blood tracks where an injured person apparently dragged himself or herself, and the only person still listed as missing was a school employee. But it was just blood tracks — no fingers wiggling, no voice, no name. Several dead people have been removed from the rubble, and it could have been their fingers rescuers thought they saw move.

Sarmiento later apologized for being so categorical, saying that if a person is still trapped it could be a child or an adult.

“The information existing at this moment doesn’t allow us to say if it is an adult or a child,” Sarmiento said. “As long as there is the slightest possibility of someone alive, we will continue searching with the same energy.” (AP)

See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Twitter and Tumblr.

A member of the Mexican Army raises his hand asking for absolute silence as rescue services and volunteers search for victims under the debris of the school that collapsed in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Jose Mendez/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rescue services and volunteers search for victims under the debris of the school that collapsed in the 7.1 magnitude earthquake in Mexico City, Mexico, 21 September 2017. (Photo: Jose Mendez/EFE via ZUMA Press)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rescue services and volunteers raise their hands to ask for absolute silence during their search for victims under the debris of the school that collapsed in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Jose Mendez/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Members of a rescue team hold a fellow rescuer from the Topos volunteer search and rescue group by his feet during the search for students at the Enrique Rebsamen school after an earthquake in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Support beams are placed on a crumbling wall of a room during the search for students at the Enrique Rebsamen school after an earthquake in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Search and rescue team members work to bring down a large piece of concrete during rescue efforts at the Enrique Rebsamen school in Mexico City, Mexico, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Anthony Vazquez/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A Marine holds on to a support beam as he waits for the beam to be tightened during rescue efforts at the Enrique Rebsamen school in Mexico City, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Anthony Vazquez/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A ladder is raised to search and rescue team members during rescue efforts at the Enrique Rebsamen school in Mexico City, Mexico, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Anthony Vazquez/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Volunteers gather during the search for students at the Enrique Rebsamen school after an earthquake in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Soldiers stand near parts of a collapsed school building during a search for students at the Enrique Rebsamen school after an earthquake in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A rescue worker searches through rubble in a floodlit search for students at Enrique Rebsamen school in Mexico City, Mexico Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Jasso/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A Marine directs movement of supplies during rescue efforts at the Enrique Rebsamen school in Mexico City, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Anthony Vazquez/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Workers reinforce a balcony during a search for students at the Enrique Rebsamen school after an earthquake in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rescue personnel work on the rescue of a trapped child at the collapsed Enrique Rebsamen primary schoool in Mexico City, Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Marco Ugarte/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A dog is held by a rescue worker during the search for students at Enrique Rebsamen school after an earthquake in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Edgard Garrido/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rescuers and members of Mexican Army search for survivors at the Enrique Rebsamen school after an earthquake in Mexico City, capital of Mexico, on Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Montse Lopez Flores/Xinhua via ZUMA Wire)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Family members of the Enrique Rebsamen school victims embrace one day after the magnitude 7.1 earthquake jolted central Mexico damaging buildings, knocking out power and causing alarm throughout the capital on Sept. 20, 2017 in Mexico City, Mexico. (Photo: Christian Palma/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rescue workers transport a tent as they search for students through the rubble at Enrique Rebsamen school after an earthquake in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Edgard Garrido/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rodrigo Arelia, a student who escaped from the rubble of his Enrique Rebsamen school, stands outside the building that collapsed during an earthquake in Mexico City, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Marco Ugarte/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Volunteers and rescue workers search for children trapped inside the Enrique Rebsamen school, collapsed by a 7.1 earthquake in southern Mexico City, Wednesday Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Miguel Tovar/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rescue workers search for people trapped in a collapsed building in the Piedad Narvarte neighborhood of Mexico City, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (Photo: Rebecca Blackwell/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rescue workers remove a dead body after searching through rubble in a floodlit search for students at Enrique Rebsamen school in Mexico City, Mexico, Sept. 20, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Jasso/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Volunteers and rescue personnel work on the remains of a collapsed primary school after a 7.1 earthquake struck Mexico City, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (Photo: Marco Ugarte/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Volunteers bring pieces of wood to help prop up sections of the collapsed Enrique Rebsamen school, as rescue workers search for children trapped inside, in Mexico City, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017.(Photo: Carlos Cisneros/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

If you are from…

  • Israel
  • Japan
  • Ecuador
  • Colombia
  • Spain
  • Costa Rica
  • Honduras
  • Chile
  •  Panamá
  • Los Ángeles
  • Switzerland


RECEIVE MY ETERNAL GRATITUDE. 🙇

May the stars, the sun and the moon bless you and your country, for sending your special brigades or teams for rescue missions to México. 

It’s chaos and disaster, and hundreds of people are still in need of aid. You have no idea how much such a gesture means and will do, all the lives that will and are being saved.

Special shoutout to Israel, for being one of the first countries to respond when being literally at the other side of the world, demonstrating borders and oceans are but illusions, and that when you want, you can.

Another thank you to any other country that has sent help and I missed.

Thank you all for the support and love. You make me believe in humanity.

Thank you for helping me save my family and rebuild my home!  🙇 ❤