earth's limb

Mud

There are no cities in this new world, but we can change that.

I walk out to the edge of the camp, past priests and architects and grazing cattle and children chasing each other in between tents; and I reach down into the mud and begin drawing on my skin: lines tethering my heart to the blazing core of the earth, tying my limbs to the slow drift of continents, my lungs to the breath of all the creatures who ever lived and died and returned to the dirt. The spirals seem to snake across my body of their own accord. I raise my hands, and the earth moves below me, like a child kicking in the womb. A city rises from the soil: spires and minarets forcing their way up into the sunlight, palaces and markets unfolding like paper chains, a thousand streets and alleys birthing themselves from the spaces between buildings, a vision becoming real.

I mean, like, not right away, obviously. What I mean is that that’s what happens after fifty-odd years of back-breaking work. But the mud was where it started, and I like to think it helped.

Earth and Milky Way from Space : Since November 2000, people have been living continuously on the International Space Station. To celebrate humanity’s 15th anniversary off planet Earth, consider this snapshot from space of our galaxy and our home world posing together beyond the orbital outpost. The Milky Way stretches below the curve of Earth’s limb in the scene that also records a faint red, extended airglow. The galaxy’s central bulge appears with starfields cut by dark rifts of obscuring interstellar dust. The picture was taken by Astronaut Scott Kelly on August 9, 2015, the 135th day of his one-year mission in space. via NASA

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Earthrise : Whats that rising over the edge of the Moon? Earth. About 47 years ago, in December of 1968, the Apollo 8 crew flew from the Earth to the Moon and back again. Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders were launched atop a Saturn V rocket on December 21, circled the Moon ten times in their command module, and returned to Earth on December 27. The Apollo 8 missions impressive list of firsts includes: the first humans to journey to the Earths Moon, the first to fly using the Saturn V rocket, and the first to photograph the Earth from deep space. As the Apollo 8 command module rounded the farside of the Moon, the crew could look toward the lunar horizon and see the Earth appear to rise, due to their spacecrafts orbital motion. Their famous picture of a distant blue Earth above the Moons limb was a marvelous gift to the world. via NASA

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Since November 2000, people have been living continuously on the International Space Station. To celebrate humanity’s 15th anniversary off planet Earth, consider this snapshot from space of our galaxy and our home world posing together beyond the orbital outpost. The Milky Way stretches below the curve of Earth’s limb in the scene that also records a faint red, extended airglow. The galaxy’s central bulge appears with starfields cut by dark rifts of obscuring interstellar dust. The picture was taken by Astronaut Scott Kelly on August 9, 2015, the 135th day of his one-year mission in space.

Image Credit: NASA, Scott Kelly

Limbless life

This is not a snake, but a legless lizard. This particular specimen (Lialis burtonis) belongs to one of several groups that have either absent or reduced limbs: to the point of being non-functional in everyday locomotion. They are distinguishable from snakes by their possession of eyelids, external ear openings, lack of broad scales on the belly, and lack of forked tongue.

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Coffee [OQ]

Bandit OQ. As prompted by ncisfinatic. This is dedicated to all my fellow coffee-lovers (hi outlawqueenluvr).


He settles onto the stool, his weight sinking its wooden legs into the soft, pliant earth, while his own limbs ache from the reprieve. It had been a long and trying day, a series of useless endeavors to nab the scoundrel who had recently taken to depriving their camp of various non-essential items. The irony is certainly not lost on Robin, but even thieves amongst thieves ought to abide by a code.

Besides which, he doesn’t exactly fancy the prospect of spending the next fortnight listening to John lament the loss of his most cherished bathing products, before they’re able to replenish his stock from the nearest unsuspecting town.

Stretching out the cramps in his knees, Robin indulges in a deep inhale, and the freshly brewed scent of something sharp and bitter-strong comforts him, significantly lifting his downtrodden spirits.

At least the troublesome bandit hadn’t thought to rob them of their coffee beans.

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Mission Specialist James H. Newman conducts an in-space evaluation of the Portable Foot Restraint (PFR) which will be used operationally on the first Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission and future Shuttle missions. He is positioned on the edge of Discovery’s payload bay. Behind him the starboard Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pod can be seen with the soft glow of an Earth limb.