earnings call

CEO Caught Tweeting, Napping During Earnings Call

During the company’s earnings call on Thursday, WoofCo, Inc. CEO Rocky was observed paying little attention to the public conglomerate’s financials, and instead laughing at videos in his Twitter feed.

Two WoofCo interns, who declined to be identified for fear of retribution, photographed Rocky browsing Twitter and snoozing while shareholders and media listened eagerly to the Q4 report, led by the company’s CFO, Paddington.

“These photographs have no bearing on Rocky’s unwavering commitment to WoofCo, its financial health, and corporate transparency,” said Randall Cogsworth, a PR representative for WoofCo, in a statement. “Everyone gets tired and everyone needs to blow off steam every now and then, and our leadership team is no different.”

via @rockyandbow

anyways now that hohc has confirmed the plausibility of my speculation let’s talk about how frank and mac are teaming up in a VR war game in PTSDee next week and let’s talk about how mac actually develops ptsd from it

who called mac a slur tonight…………………………………..

can someone please even attempt to explain how inclusionists are antisemitic? Because I never get one when I ask, just “you’ve been widely antisemitic”

meanwhile REGs have been telling people to go to concentration camps to “earn” their pain, calling jewish people subhuman, and trying to push an acronym calling undesirable people “RATs,” and they’re all things that really took off and got a lot of people supporting/defending them, so it’s not like you can hide and say it never happens

4

“The viera may begin as part of the Wood, but the Wood is not the only end that we may choose.”

The viera live deep within wooded area, earning them the call “People of the Wood.” They have excellent senses, and their hair is usually white It is said that the viera’s superb hearing allows them to sense changes in the weather and the movement of all living things in the woods they inhabit. Their lifespan is roughly three times that of humes.

rafe adler + relationship headcanons

First of all, I have never been in a fandom so welcoming and amazing. That anyone cares what I think about any character honestly blows my mind. Thank you guys so much. I wanna stay here forever.

Second of all, so I got an ask about Rafe in love and I made all these lists and then I realized I totally did not answer any of the questions that had been asked of me lmao so anyway. I’ll work on that tomorrow. For now, I figured I’d just post the lists anyway XP

Keep reading

2

2x09 vs 2x12

Yikes.

Submit of:

‘I need to submit master’ and a kik address.

Okay. No honey. No. No. This is not the way. 

I’m sure I don’t know what you’ve seen on my site to make you think such an approach would be deemed appropriate, welcome or taken up.

No offence taken, but I’m going to take this lesson public so as to help you, and others, with how to approach a Dom like me in the future m’kay? M’kay.

Firstly: I don’t know you. No greeting, no message or chat before, no letter of introduction from someone I know. You are no-one to me. Your needs are none of my concern.

Secondly: I am not your Master (capital ‘M’). I am extremely selective about who I allow into my harem and even then! It took my puppy B a year to earn the right to call me Master. ‘Sir’ is generally considered the appropriate workaday honorific for a random sub to use when first approaching a Dom. 

Thirdly: I really don’t want unsolicited personal details. If we talk and I decide I want you, I will set the terms and conditions, including access, modes of address and which platforms we will be using. Your part is simply to agree to the terms, or not.  

All in all, this just reads like spam. Presumptuous, bottom-topping, need-a-quick-wank-on-my-terms Tourist spam at that. 

This just isn’t going to gain my attention in the right way.

But I wish you the best. I hope you found what you’re looking for and this advice serves you well in the future.

anonymous asked:

🐶 ☀️ 🍰

Meet the People in My Muse’s Life

🐶 – a pet

When I was a child, I was looked after by a very old Sehlat named I-Chaya. He had been my father’s, and he watched over me as he did Sarek. He was bigger than I was, a great mound of tawny fur. One of his fangs was broken, giving him a snaggle-toothed appearance, but he wore it with dignity and grace. He was poisoned by a le-matya’s bite when I was doing something I was not supposed to do, and instead of having him live on in pain, I chose to let him go.

I recognize that in my fondness for him that I give him credit for a sentience he did not have, but his refusal to do as he was told, saved my life I believe he’s earned me calling him a friend more than a pet.

🌟🍰- a family member and someone who loves food

My mother had a fondness for bread and baked goods. When we’d go to Earth, she would take me into San Francisco in search of ‘real sourdough’ and other earthly delights. She was also quite fond of cake donuts and bagels, which she called ‘anti-donuts’ as they were traditionally savory instead of sweet although there were ‘mutations’ that were more dessert like.

Disney's CEO says there are too many ads on TV, and it might be time to cut back

(Disney CEO Bob IgerGetty / Scott Olson)
Disney CEO Bob Iger thinks there are too many ads on TV, and he’s exploring whether Disney's ESPN and ABC channels should reduce the amount of commercials.

“In general there is probably too much commercial interruption in television,” Iger said during Disney’s quarterly earnings call Tuesday, especially when TV is competing with new digital upstarts like Netflix, some of whom don’t have ads at all.

Iger said Disney would evaluate the amount of ads aired within programs for its ESPN and ABC TV channels, though he did not say that any cuts to the so-called ad load were looming.

The Disney CEO also gave a lot of insight into how he thinks about the future of TV, and he seems particularly focused on new streaming TV packages, which compete with cable and satellite TV, and on “a la carte” services like HBO Now or CBS All Access.

Full stream ahead

ESPN saw a decline in revenue this quarter, and while Disney blamed most of it on a quirk in the college football schedule, Disney did acknowledge a decrease in subscribers. ESPN has lost over 9 million subscribers since 2013, according to Nielsen, and it’s a problem that isn’t likely to stop any time soon.

But Iger was upbeat about ESPN, and described a future for the network very much tied to an evolution of the TV landscape.

Iger said ESPN was already seeing “nice gains” in subscribers from streaming TV packages like Dish’s Sling TV, AT&T’s DirecTV Now, and Sony’s Vue. (He said these haven’t been fully counted by Nielsen.) These TV packages function much like a traditional cable or satellite TV plan, but are delivered over the internet, and are generally less expensive.

Disney is focused on making sure ESPN is in every package, even the ones with fewer channels.

Iger argued that if we end up in a world where $40 to $50 per month TV packages are more popular, that might actually be an opening for ESPN to capitalize on, rather than drop out of packages.

Iger said Disney would “aggressively” develop direct-to-consumer offerings, and that one tied to ESPN would launch “in calendar 2017.” He said that if consumers are spending less money on their cable bundles, they might be more likely to spend it on another service, like a direct-to-consumer “add-on” product from ESPN. That’s assuming that ESPN, which demands high fees, won’t slip out of the most popular streaming TV offerings (a nightmare scenario for Disney).

In Iger’s future, any declines in the traditional TV business would be offset by ESPN (and other Disney properties) getting onto all the digital TV bundles, and then selling other a la carte services.

Here is a rundown of ESPN’s future battle plan, according to Iger:

  • Launching ESPN on all new streaming TV services.

  • Investing in “industry-leading programming.”

  • Growing ESPN's presence on mobile.

  • Investing in tech that will allow direct-to-consumer products, particularly with BAMTech, which Disney has invested $1 billion in.

NOW WATCH: Here’s the gorgeous trailer for ‘Super Mario Odyssey’ — the first Mario game for Nintendo Switch



More From Business Insider
HTC will stop making cheap phones this year
Vlad SavovHTC will exit the entry-level smartphone market later this year, the company announced during its earnings call earlier this week, according to Phonescoop. The company said it would continue to support cheaper phones that have been released, but acknowledged that its focus would shift to high-end, high-margin devices. This isn’t the first time HTC has reduced its smartphone output; back in 2012, the company notably reduced its handset output to focus on its top-tier smartphones. … Read more
Spike TV to Become Paramount Network in Viacom Rebranding (Exclusive)

There’s a big change coming to Spike TV.

Viacom’s male-focused cable network, home to Lip Sync Battle, is expected to be rebranded as the Paramount Network, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. A formal announcement will likely come Thursday morning when Viacom unveils its turnaround plan during its quarterly earnings call.

Sources tell THR that Spike chief Kevin Kay - who recently added oversight of CMT and TV Land to his purview of the Global Entertainment Group - is expected to remain in place. The rebranding could begin as early as 2018, sources say, and no personnel changes are expected to be made at this time. Representatives for Viacom and Spike declined comment, though a formal rollout strategy is expected to be part of Thursday’s call.

Read more: Viacom to Unveil Turnaround Plan: “Change” at Paramount in Attempt to Mimic Disney

It’s unclear what the rebranding would mean for Spike’s current lineup, which includes upcoming scripted foray The Mist as well as unscripted hits Bar Rescue, Ink Master, Lip Sync Battle and more. Newly minted Viacom CEO Bob Bakish is said to be plotting a strategy for the company that’s similar to the ultra-synergistic Walt Disney Co. in creating branded entertainment that can be exploited across platforms. To that end, Disney has had great success around its namesake network.

Such a move would more strongly align the TV group with the film studio, and allow Paramount to better define itself in a crowded era. It’s no secret that the studio, like the channels, has struggled in recent years; in January, Bakish had to brush off reports that Viacom was considering a sale of Paramount - assuring a crowd at a programming conference that the brand will be “a much more integral part of Viacom moving forward.”

This year is shaping up to be a big one for cable rebrandings. Just last week, Oxygen confirmed its shift to a crime-focused network, and it followed cable sibling Esquire’s decision to abandon its linear channel. By the same token, the future of some of Viacom’s more niche cable brands have been speculated about as the cable ecosystem braces for a potential a la carte world.

Whatever Viacom’s plans entail, Bakish has wasted no time in shaking up the executive roster. After a year of a great many changes at the individual networks, Doug Herzog, formerly president of the music and entertainment group, exited Viacom in December after a decades-long tenure overseeing such networks as MTV, VH1, Logo, Spike and Comedy Central. 
Disney's CEO says there are too many ads on TV — and lays out ESPN's plan for the future

(Disney CEO Bob IgerGetty / Scott Olson)
Disney CEO Bob Iger thinks there are too many ads on TV, and he’s exploring whether Disney's ESPN and ABC channels should reduce the amount of commercials.

“In general there is probably too much commercial interruption in television,” Iger said during Disney’s quarterly earnings call Tuesday, especially when TV is competing with new digital upstarts like Netflix, some of whom don’t have ads at all.

Iger said Disney would evaluate the amount of ads aired within programs for its ESPN and ABC TV channels, though he did not say that any cuts to the so-called ad load were looming.

The Disney CEO also gave a lot of insight into how he thinks about the future of TV, and he seems particularly focused on new streaming TV packages, which compete with cable and satellite TV, and on “a la carte” services like HBO Now or CBS All Access.

Full stream ahead

ESPN saw a decline in revenue this quarter, and while Disney blamed most of it on a quirk in the college football schedule, Disney did acknowledge a decrease in subscribers. ESPN has lost over 9 million subscribers since 2013, according to Nielsen, and it’s a problem that isn’t likely to stop any time soon.

But Iger was upbeat about ESPN, and described a future for the network very much tied to an evolution of the TV landscape.

Iger said ESPN was already seeing “nice gains” in subscribers from streaming TV packages like Dish’s Sling TV, AT&T’s DirecTV Now, and Sony’s Vue. (He said these haven’t been fully counted by Nielsen.) These TV packages function much like a traditional cable or satellite TV plan, but are delivered over the internet, and are generally less expensive.

Disney is focused on making sure ESPN is in every package, even the ones with fewer channels.

Iger argued that if we end up in a world where $40 to $50 per month TV packages are more popular, that might actually be an opening for ESPN to capitalize on, rather than drop out of packages.

Iger said Disney would “aggressively” develop direct-to-consumer offerings, and that one tied to ESPN would launch “in calendar 2017.” He said that if consumers are spending less money on their cable bundles, they might be more likely to spend it on another service, like a direct-to-consumer “add-on” product from ESPN. That’s assuming that ESPN, which demands high fees, won’t slip out of the most popular streaming TV offerings (a nightmare scenario for Disney).

In Iger’s future, any declines in the traditional TV business would be offset by ESPN (and other Disney properties) getting onto all the digital TV bundles, and then selling other a la carte services.

Here is a rundown of ESPN’s future battle plan, according to Iger:

  • Launching ESPN on all new streaming TV services.

  • Investing in “industry-leading programming.”

  • Growing ESPN's presence on mobile.

  • Investing in tech that will allow direct-to-consumer products, particularly with BAMTech, which Disney has invested $1 billion in.

NOW WATCH: Google stopped asking these 7 job interview questions because they were so tricky



More From Business Insider
Pepsi CFO the world has gone from 'a volatile place to an even more volatile place'

When PepsiCo (NYSE: PEP) released its better-than-expected earnings earlier Wednesday, some investors initially honed in on its conservative forecast.

“We certainly feel good about the way the business is performing, but I think it’s fairly undeniable that the world has gone from a volatile place to an even more volatile place over the last six to nine months,” Pepsico CFO Hugh Johnston told CNBC on “Squawk on the Street.”

“So when we give guidance, we certainly look to give cautious guidance to ensure investors understand that we are committed to delivering our guidance and we’ll see how the year progresses.”

Pepsi said it expects 2017 organic revenue growth to be at least 3 percent and earnings per share growth of 8 percent. That means Pepsi’s forecast calls earnings this year of $5.09 a share, which is shy of analyst expectations of $5.16, according to FactSet.

Despite beating Wall Street’s fourth-quarter earnings expectations, shares of Pepsi fell as much as 2 percent Wednesday before recovering. The stock was flat in late morning trading.

The soft-drink company, which also owns Frito-Lay and Gatorade, posted earnings per share of $1.20 excluding items on $19.52 billion in revenue. Analysts had expected it to earn $1.16 per share on $19.51 billion in revenue.

High demand for healthier beverages and snacks in North America bolstered sales. Sales volume grew 3 percent globally for snacks and 1 percent for its beverages, the company reported.

Products that have grains, protein and fruit — dubbed its “everyday nutrition” — are more than double the size of the company’s cola business, Johnston said. Pepsi’s flagship cola business accounts for about 12 percent of sales, while “everyday nutrition” is 25 percent.

Earlier, on the company’s earnings conference call, CEO Indra Nooyi said Pepsi will continue to innovate, having already increased its investment in research and development 45 percent since 2011, about $3.5 billion on food quality and safety initiatives.



More From CNBC
Here’s what CEOs said on this week’s earnings calls

Each week we read dozens of transcripts from earnings calls and presentations as part of our investment process. Below is a weekly post which contains some of the most important quotes about the economy and industry trends from those transcripts. Click here to receive these posts weekly via email.

For most of this bull market bearish sentiment has been consensus. Even while the market has risen, it’s been easy to hold a negative view, and most people did (including me). Recently those negative voices have been fading though. In fact, they have been so drowned out that when I saw a CEO warn about the state of capital markets this week it actually felt genuinely contrarian. That doesn’t mean that the bull market is over, but it does mean that one of its greatest assets, pessimism, is slowly melting away.  For now though, animal spirits are running strong.

The Macro Outlook:

The industrial economy has some momentum

“I think that what we’re seeing is the increased investments going on from a – just from pent-up – a situation for many years. We’re starting to see some of that flow … So I see a pretty steady recovery here. I don’t see a snap. As I’ve said, I’ve always felt that 2017 would be a good year of building that foundation and see a improvement. I see a much stronger 2018 than I see 2017. But I see right now, based on what I’m seeing from the customer base, based on what I’m hearing from some of our customers and what they’re saying they’re going to spend on capital next year, overall, I think the pressure is upward.” –Emerson CEO David Farr (Industrial Components)

Some manufacturers can’t keep up with orders

“Our inventories definitely on the lighter side…But every quarter we have been kind of beating the numbers and honestly not been able to build the inventories we set a target where the inventory would slightly grow and then we ship it all and the inventory does not grow. ” –Microchip CEO Steve Sanghi (Semiconductors)

This has now become a truly contrarian perspective:

“I’ve been around long enough to have lived through all sorts of markets. I’ve learned to respect markets, while at the same time being skeptical of conventional wisdom. I’ve lived through a bond bear market and a gargantuan bond bull market. I’ve seen bond yields above 15% and below 2%. I’ve seen inflationary spirals, I’ve seen deflationary threats, I’ve seen deregulation and reregulation. I’ve seen the S&P 500 trade as high as 30 times earnings and I’ve seen the S&P trade as low as 7 times earnings. With all this experience, that comes with age I might add, here is what I’m seeing in the markets today. In the credit markets, spreads on the high yield securities are approaching historically tight levels, while key credit metrics such as leverage and coverage ratios are showing signs of weakening. The leverage loan market has been overrun by such massive inflows of capital that you could probably get a loan to buy a fleet of zeppelins at this point in time. With respect to rates, the 10-year treasury note is currently trading at around 2.5%, up from its recent lows, but still well below historic norms. In my view, the mood of these markets is in stark contrast with the many unknown from our current economic and political landscape, both here and abroad. For me, it’s a major disconnect, and it concerns me…The S&P 500 is trading at roughly 19 times earnings, 3 turns higher than the 50-year average of 2016. These valuations make me uncomfortable, especially given the unknowns in taxation, foreign trade, regulation and more…To sum up, in my opinion, the markets are priced for perfection, and they have been that way for quite some time, complacency reign supreme. However, my experience has shown me that this state of affairs won’t go on indefinitely. So why am I sharing these thoughts with you? Because I know that some of you have wondered why we brought back relatively few Loews shares in 2016 or why Loews hasn’t made an acquisition…It’s a tough market in which to be a disciplined buyer.” –Loews CEO James Tisch (Insurance)

But should it be contrarian?

The world is still unusually uncertain

“Looking forward, our continuing view is that the world is unusually uncertain, and perhaps even more so given the regime change in Washington and the questions surrounding the administration’s proposed agenda. ” –Oaktree Chairman Howard Marks (Asset Management)

The consumer isn’t showing the same pep as industry

“I think October was a little slower and then early November was good and it kind of leveled out again. So it’s kind of up and down by weeks. Some of it’s the way the calendar falls for us this year with the coming off the 53-week year, but I would just tell you it’s a little slower out there right now” –Sysco CEO Bill Delaney (Restaurant Supplier)

The downturn in CRE in the UK is exceeding JLL’s worst expectations

“it is fair to say that the Brexit vote, in particular, hasn’t created an environment which encourages our clients to take long-term decisions around their real estate portfolios…Now we are staying very close to the situation in the UK, but though the development has been clearly exceeding our most negative expectations which we got for the Brexit but at the end of the day, we are very hopeful that pragmatism will take over and that things will play out fine for the UK going forward.” –Jones Lang LaSalle CEO Christian Ulbrich (CRE Broker)

Tax reform may take longer than expected

“So I’m looking for clarity by late summer, early fall and that gives me time, as I get into execution later this year, early 2018 based on if I have to change anything.” –Emerson CEO David Farr (Industrial Components)

Companies are looking before they leap

“I honestly just think it’s too early to start to speculate. And we’re certainly not building anything into our plans positively or negatively for that matter related to any policies that might come out. But I can assure you that we’re watching it very closely.” –Visa CEO Alfred Kelly (Payments)

Excitement can quickly turn to animosity

“Obviously the President has said that his top priority is to stimulate growth and get people working and expand the economic pie…I can’t say what the President’s view is going to be in the future…So I can’t – I can only – I could only speculate but I don’t have obviously the crystal ball that permits me to give an accurate answer to that question. Reinforces my view that I’ve long held that I hate politicians.” –Kilroy CEO John Kilroy (REIT)

If trade stops, war starts

“If trade stops, war starts…We have to actively prove that trade helps people to communicate. And we should have fair trade, transparent trade, inclusive trade.” –Alibaba CEO Jack Ma (E-commerce)

Invariably there will be another down cycle someday

“Every year that goes by logically increases the probability, but there are times, like today, when people say, oh, you know, we’re in a virtuous circle. We have an accommodative Fed, we have expanding – well, the Fed’s accommodative, but not too much, and the economy is expanding, but not too much that it has to be reined in, and corporations are doing well in piling up cash, and debt has been refinanced and paid down, and they’ll give you a hundred reasons why there’s not going to be another down cycle again, but invariably there is.” –Oaktree Chairman Howard Marks (Asset Management)

Not necessarily in the near term though

“There is a tremendous amount of leverage paper in the world. There is a business cycle and we feel very good about the restructuring group and what the next three years look like. But that’s not to say that I characterize it as growth in the very short-term.” –Moelis and Co CEO Ken Moelis (M&A Advisory)

International:

On the one hand, Mario Draghi sounds slightly more optimistic

“On the one hand, the evidence suggests that the acute deflation risks have disappeared and that inflation is set to pick up over the coming years. And contrary to a widespread perception, euro area economic conditions have also been steadily improving…And in the last quarter, the recovery has been broadening across sectors and across countries.” –ECB President Mario Draghi (Central Bank)

But on the other, not much has changed

“Looking ahead, risks to the euro area outlook remain tilted to the downside and relate predominantly to global factors. Our current monetary policy stance foresees that, if the inflation outlook becomes less favourable, or if financial conditions become inconsistent with further progress towards a sustained adjustment in the path of inflation, the Governing Council is prepared to increase the asset purchase programme in terms of size and/or duration.” –ECB President Mario Draghi (Central Bank)

Central bankers are on their way out anyways

“In many respects we’re coming to the last seconds of central bankers’ fifteen minutes of fame which is a good thing… In general it’s a much better balance than the only game in town being central banks and monetary policy. This is positive.” –Bank of England CEO Mark Carney (Central Bank)

Financials:

M&A thrives in loose regulatory environments

“There’s a feeling that you can achieve the goals you set out that the government will not get in your way if you have a strategy to implement something and I think that’s rifling through all industries, people call it animal spirits but I think it’s the optimism that they can envision a creative way to create value and that the government might not get in their way and that’s going to motivate people to attempt and try things that will be exciting for everyone. That’s what I think is going to drive the M&A market.” –Moelis and Co CEO Ken Moelis (M&A Advisory)

Consumer:

Amazon is opening more physical stores

“Probably more advanced and further along are the Amazon Bookstores. We have three physical stores; Seattle, San Diego, and Portland right now. We see adding five more this year. So we’re still in that phase where we’re testing and learning and getting better, even on the bookstore. I would say there’s other things that are physical in nature, the pop-up stores and college pickup points that we learn from as well, and think creates a great value particularly at the college pickup points.” –Amazon CFO Brian Olsavsky (E-Commerce)

Nobody really worries about Wal-Mart anymore

“we were ignored for most of our history. Nobody paid any attention to us. And – but we continued to expand and grow and we got more and more successful, and then kind of the conventional supermarkets, they were – I think they were really pre-occupied with Walmart, and trying to be competitive with Walmart for a long time…” –Whole Foods CEO John Mackey (Grocery)

Over-the-top video packages could be at a tipping point

“it seems like we’re on the cusp of some significant growth for new entrants in the multi-channel marketplace. And what we like about them is they are mobile friendly or mobile first, their user interfaces tend to be very strong, and their pricing is priced substantially lower than the expanded basic bundle that most of the MVPDs are offering…we think that this wave that we’re seeing is really a signal of what is to come and what the future will be” –Disney CEO Bob Iger (Media)

Content creators benefit from more downstream competition

“we think that that proliferation of downstream competition is really, really healthy for content creators and for brands like ours that robust, that are differentiated, that can really deliver content that works for customers…we do believe that it can reverse some of these overall declines in subscriber trends in the total MVPD universe and have that go forward.” –21st Century Fox CEO James Murdoch (Media)

OTT hasn’t really exploded yet though

“I’d say OTT is growing at a very solid pace. It hasn’t exploded. At times people think that might happen, but that’s not taken place.” –Akamai CEO Tom Leighton (Content Delivery Network)

Technology:

China has adopted digital payments faster than anyone

“I have not, from the experience around the world, seen a single country where the adoption of digital technology is at a higher level than China. It’s extraordinary how people’s lives revolve around digital technology. And particularly impressive is the transition of almost over two years from zero credit card or anything other than cash to suddenly, in some stores, cashless payment being a majority of our sales…you go to stores in China now and regularly, you will see people paying with their cell phones in a variety of retail formats.” –Yum China CEO Micky Pant (KFC)

Healthcare:

Drug companies are pointing fingers at others for high prices

“If you look at the University of [California] Berkeley data showing that of $100 paid to an innovative drug company at list, only $63 on average makes it through to the company. That’s $37 out of the $100 are being paid to non-innovators in a system which thinks it’s paying high prices for innovation. So that’s really, that’s something that’s going to have to start to be addressed.” –Glaxo Smith Klein CEO Andrew Witty (Pharmaceuticals)

Drug distributors are taking issue with that

“any suggestion that PBMs are causing drug prices to rise is simply erroneous. We are the solution and not the problem. And that’s why both public and private payers continue to count on PBMs as indispensable partners that help to manage their drug trend.” –CVS CEO Larry Merlo (Pharmacy)

Industrials:

The best application of the internet of things is in the industrial marketplace

“So I think we’ve always believe that the industrial market is where the true strength of a IoT fits. It’s where there are very strong business models for the investments that are required in the IoT infrastructure that’s going to be put in.” –Microchip CEO Steve Sanghi (Semiconductors)

Materials, Energy:

The oil industry is optimistic that the worst is behind it

“Frankly, I’m glad 2016 is behind us…we still have challenges ahead. Nevertheless, $50 oil has been a welcome relief. I attribute my gray hair to the many previous downturns I’ve been through, 1986, 1991, 1999, 2002, and 2009. They all required difficult decisions and cost reductions, but this one has been unusually grim and painful.” –National Oilwell Varco CEO Clay Williams (Oil Service Equipment)

Miscellaneous Nuggets of Wisdom:

Downturns are an opportunity to become better

“downturns are an opportunity to become better…The downturn of the 1980s was also particularly severe. E&P operators faced the very same challenges they always do when oil prices plummet, how to improve cost per barrel, again, a necessity to survive and again invention followed. I credit the downturn of the 1980s with the inventions of measurement-while-drilling [MWD] systems, logging-while-drilling systems, top drives, rotary steerables, horizontal drilling technology, and PDC bits technologies that frankly enabled the shale revolution. It’s not a stretch to say that the seeds of this amazing new source of oil and gas from shale are a direct result of the downturn of the 1980s.” –National Oilwell Varco CEO Clay Williams (Oil Service Equipment)

Full transcripts can be found at www.seekingalpha.com