early-1990s

The traditional gargoyle is a horrendous creature who leers out of medieval church walls. But people have continued making gargoyles right up into the modern day, bringing science fictional flourishes to these fantasy creations.

A Xenomorph on Paisley Abbey, Scotland, built in the early 14th century

Many of the original gargoyles were replaced during the renovations in the early 1990s, so we’re afraid that one of the stonemasons was in a funny mood.

19th and 20th Centuries Although not designed to drain water and therefore technically not gargoyles, the grotesques on modern structures are still considered by most people to be gargoyles. Grotesques were used as decoration on 19th- and early 20th-century buildings in cities such as New York (where the Chrysler Building’s stainless steel gargoyles are celebrated), Minneapolis, and Chicago. Gargoyles can be found on many churches and other buildings. One extensive collection of modern gargoyles can be found in Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC. The cathedral, begun in 1908, is encrusted with the limestone demons. This collection also includes Darth Vader, a crooked politician, robots and many other modern spins on the ancient tradition. The 20th Century collegiate form of the Gothic Revival produced many modern gargoyles, notably at Princeton University, Washington University in St. Louis, Duke University, and the University of Chicago.


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MU/TH/UR 9000 | Symbolism in Alien: Covenant | Alien Mythology Prequel Project

Important Quotes from GRRM

“Some people I met thought we have to find the story’s through line. Who’s the important character? Somebody thought that Dany’s the important character – cut away everybody else, tell the story of Dany. Or Jon Snow. Those were the two most popular characters to build everything around, except you’re losing 90 percent of the story. “ - Rollingstone 2014

“[T]hey couldn’t get a handle on the size of the material, the very thing that I set out to do. I had all these meetings saying, “There’s too many characters, it’s too big — Jon Snow is the central character. We’ll eliminate all the other characters and we’ll make it about Jon Snow.” Or “Daenerys is the central character. We’ll eliminate everyone else and make the movie about Daenerys.” And I turned down all those deals.” -Time Magazine 2017

These two quotes are probably the most important quotes from George because he plainly states that the story is not just about Jon/Dæny. George narrows them down to being only 10% of the story. Are they important? Yes. But so are a host of other characters.


“So all that time I thought Gandalf was dead, and now he’s back and now he’s Gandalf the White. And, ehh, he’s more or less the same as always, except he’s more powerful. It always felt a little bit like a cheat to me. And as I got older and considered it more, it also seemed to me that death doesn’t make you more powerful. That’s, in some ways, me talking to Tolkien in the dialogue, saying, “Yeah, if someone comes back from being dead, especially if they suffer a violent, traumatic death, they’re not going to come back as nice as ever.“ That’s what I was trying to do, and am still trying to do, with the Lady Stoneheart character.” - Time Magazine, 2017

Death does not make you stronger or nicer. Applying this to Jon, he is not the same and never will be.


“At some points, when [Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss] and I had discussions about what way we should go in, I would always favor sticking with the books, while they would favor making changes,” he said. “I think one of the biggest ones would probably be when they made the decision not to bring Catelyn Stark back as Lady Stoneheart. That was probably the first major diversion of the show from the books and, you know, I argued against that, and David and Dan made that decision.” - Time Magazine, 2017

Leaving Lady Stoneheart out was something George feels is a big mistake, we can assume that Lady Stoneheart is integral to the storyline in the unreleased books.


"It was the summer of 1991. I was still involved in Hollywood. My agent was trying to get me meetings to pitch my ideas, but I didn’t have anything to do in May and June. It had been years since I wrote a novel. I had an idea for a science-fiction novel called ”Avalon. I started work on it and it was going pretty good, when suddenly it just came to me, this scene, from what would ultimately be the first chapter of A Game of Thrones. It’s from Bran’s viewpoint; they see a man beheaded and they find some direwolf pups in the snow. It just came to me so strongly and vividly that I knew I had to write it. I sat down to write, and in, like, three days it just came right out of me, almost in the form you’ve read.”- Rollingstone, 2014

The Starks sparked the idea, and are at the very root of the story, but not the entire story. This also emphasizes that this book is not just about a bastard and dragon. +Bran is important, though the show fails to portray this.


“You have to remember that I started writing this story in 1991 and I first met David and Dan in 2007. I was living with these characters and this world for 16 years before we even started working on the show. They’re pretty fixed in my mind and I’m not going to change anything because of the show, or reaction to the show, or what fans think. I’m just still writing the story that I set out to write in the early 1990s.- Time Magazine, 2017

Self-explanatory.


I think there are two types of writers, the architects and the gardeners. The architects plan everything ahead of time, like an architect building a house. They know how many rooms are going to be in the house, what kind of roof they’re going to have, where the wires are going to run, what kind of plumbing there’s going to be. They have the whole thing designed and blueprinted out before they even nail the first board up.”

The gardeners dig a hole, drop in a seed and water it,“ he told the Guardian. "They kind of know what seed it is, they know if [they] planted a fantasy seed or mystery seed or whatever. But as the plant comes up and they water it, they don’t know how many branches it’s going to have, they find out as it grows.-2011, The Guardian

“In the case of any of my novels, I know where I’m starting from, I know where I want to end up, more or less,” he said. “I know some of the big turning points along the way, the stuff I’m building for, but you discover an awful lot along the way. Characters rise up and seem more important, and you get to what you’d thought was going to be a big turning point and… the thing you’d thought about two years ago doesn’t really work as well, so you have a better idea! There’s always that process of discovery for me. I know not all writers work that way, but it’s always been the way I work.” -Time Magazine, 2017

Putting these quotes together because they’re implying similar things. 

George has a view of where he’s going but that doesn’t mean things can’t be reimagined. For an example, George’s original outline is almost completely different from the books we have now, but a few parts of the outline are still there, but taking shape in different characters.


I did consider in the very early stages not having the dragons in there. I wanted the Targaryen’s symbol to be the dragons, but I did play with the notion that maybe it was like a psionic power, that it was pyrokinesis — that they could conjure up flames with their minds. I went back and forth. My friend and fellow fantasy writer Phyllis Eisenstein actually was the one who convinced me to put the dragons in, and I dedicated the third book to her. And I think it was the right call.” -2017 Meduza


“In some senses, Theon is struggling all the way through to be a hero. They both come out of the same situation: they’re both raised in Winterfell by Eddard Stark, but they’re not part of the real, core family. Theon is a ward, and Jon Snow is a bastard son. So they’re both a little outside, but Jon handles this successfully, and Theon fails to handle this. He is poisoned by his own envy and his sense of not belonging.” -2017 Meduza

This quote brings the Season 7 scene with Jon and Theon to mind. Theon tells Jon that he always made the right decision, while Theon made the wrong decisions (choosing the Greyjoys over the Stark family that raised him). Jon will make the right decision.


“So many readers were reading the books with so much attention that they were throwing up some theories, and while some of those theories were amusing bulls— and creative, some of the theories are right. At least one or two readers had put together the extremely subtle and obscure clues that I’d planted in the books and came to the right solution." -The Telegraph, 2014

Extremely Subtle and obscure hints; George’s bittersweet ending will not be predictable. Only a few people have figured out the ending. If your predicted ending involves ultimate good (humans) vs ultimate evil (others), you already lost.

Think twice before flashing your dick to my mom.

My mom has spent her life working in the justice system, as a beloved juvenile parole officer. One day, in the early/mid 1990s, she was running an errand for work, parked in the store’s lot, and when she came out, saw a car had parked extremely close to her driver’s side door.

Intentionally.

Too close.

So close that there would only be enough room for her to barely squeeze inside her car - but would absolutely prompt anyone to look over and give the wtf/fuck you glare.

When she did, she saw a guy by himself in his car, dick fully exposed, staring at her & going to town on himself.

Instead of giving him any kind of shocked reaction, she ignored him, but did write down his license plate number, and went right back to work unbothered. (this had actually already happened to her once prior, for some reason.)

It was after that that she had a colleague look into the license plate info, for any relevant details, and to their surprise, it was registered to a woman.

My mom then wrote a simple, anonymous letter, and mailed it to the woman at their address - letting her know that while she is out, her husband is using their family car to expose himself to women.

TL;DR - my mom doesn’t have time for your dick.

SEPTEMBER 4: Xena: Warrior Princess premieres (1995)

On this day in 1995, the very first episode of Xena: Warrior Princess aired on NBC. Although the series had no explicit LGBT characters, the lesbian-coding of its titular character and her gal pal Gabrielle made the show a cult lesbian classic throughout the 1990s and early 2000s.

Although dated to today’s audience, Xena: Warrior Princess was a progressive show of storytelling and special effects for its time (x).

Set in a fantasy-eqsue Ancient Greece, Xena: Warrior Princess follows the story of Xena, an Amazon warrior played by Lucy Lawless, as she travels the globe and defends the innocent along with her right-hand woman and farm girl turned fighter, Gabrielle, played by Renee O’Connor. Although the show was a spin-off of Hercules: The Legendary Journey in which the character of Xena was depicted as a villain, Xena: Warrior Princess flipped the script and portrayed Xena as a hero on her path of redemption and eventually surpassed its predecessor in both ratings and popularity. During its second season, it was the top rated syndicated drama series on American television and remained in the top 5 for the rest of the show’s lifespan.

In what would now be deemed as “queerbaiting” of the highest order, lesbian viewers of Xena: Warrior Princess were continually teased by jokes and innuendos in the show about the true nature of Xena and Gabrielle’s relationship. In the media landscape of 2017 where LGBT audiences have somewhat of an array of media to choose from, such obvious disregard for lesbian viewers might have tanked the series, but in 1995, it what was catapulted it to cult classic status. Xena became a culturally significant moment in lesbian history. In a hilarious attempt to slyly target lesbian customers, the car company Subaru even released advertisements in the mid-1990s that showed cars with license plates that read “XENA LVR,” and an LGBT rights group was formed that called themselves The Marching Xenas. 

Originally posted by dougwp

Although the promised reboot of Xena: Warrior Princess in which Xena and Gabrielle were to be canonically a couple was recently cancelled by NBC, nothing can erase the original show’s cultural impact and the lesbian audience that propelled it forward. In 2006, the Xena costume was donated to the National Museum of American History, and perhaps even more satisfying, in 2003, Lucy Lawless herself gave an interview in which she answered speculation about Xena and Gabrielle’s relationship by saying, “They’re married, man.”

-LC

What’s in the Mix with a Mix-Tape? (12x19)

Mix-tapes were a feature of my twenties in the early 1990s. I’ve still got a tonne of them. Although, that tech died for a reason - it degrades big time. 

But, I’ve kept them for sentiment. They have home-made covers, created from cut-up and cut-down postcards, with hand-writing in coloured pen listing the tracks on the inside. And sometimes, hand-drawn hearts and personal dedications. 

They were made for me by people who loved me - some of whom are still in my life, some not. 

Making a mix-tape took hours, especially if you were (as we usually did) making a compilation and mixing and matching artists. You had to think about how each track would follow another; the tone, the tempo, the mood, the lyrics. Wind, rewind, record, relisten… they were extended love-notes very often. 

Dean’s mix-tape for Cas reads “Dean’s top 13 Zepp TRA XX”

  He’s written it as “TRA XX” as if, just maybe, you could read that as a couple of kisses at the end, insteady of a groovy way to spell “tracks”. Ambiguous, diffident, scrawled, unspoken, but there… Oh Dean….

But, Cas tried to give it back. After ignoring Dean’s phone-calls, Cas returned to the bunker to try and return a piece of Dean ‘s heart, to lie to him and steal from him.

Cas came into Dean’s room, his intimate and personal space, and, as Dean says, “played him”. He stole the Colt from under Dean’s pillow, knowing full well what the history of the Colt means to Dean.  

Characterization-wise, how can Cas have regressed like that? Knowing, as he does, that going behind Dean’s back in S6 hurt Dean so much and began such a terrible rift between them?

Sure, Cas says it’s to protect the Winchesters from Dagon. No doubt that’s true. 

But, Castiel is also someone who has recently said “I love you” (in 12x12 Stuck in the Middle with You) and not heard it back…

Have you ever said “I love you” to someone and not heard it back? 

It haunts you, it eats at you, you feel stupid, you feel rejected, you feel… lost.

Dean’s mix-tape was probably his way of trying to say, “I love you” back,  but how would Cas know what a mix-tape means? Or perhaps he did know, thanks to Metatron’s pop-culture upgrade, and returning the tape was our angel’s way of being a bit snippy, a bit passive-aggressive  - Thanks for the cop-out tape gift, Dean, but I would quite like to hear you say it. 

And why is Dean so forgiving, explaining to Sam how Cas needs a win, how he gets it, as he rumages around under the hood of Cas’s truck, fixing her up?

Well, it’s eternal sub-text, of course, but here goes… 

Because Dean knows he is someone to whom, “I love you,” has been said. And, despite his worried phone calls, his appeals to “Team Free Will”, Dean also knows he is someone who has not said it back…

unless of course you count two “XX”’s on a mix-tape.

I am 100% convinced that late 1980s/early 1990s romantic fantasy is the aesthetic forerunner of basically all post-ironic Internet media. Like, I was just thinking about that Mercedes Lackey novel where a racecar driver melts a dark elf’s brain by thinking They Might Be Giants lyrics at him really hard, and it struck me: this explains everything.