early development

anonymous asked:

Hey, you're awesome, thanks for existing, basically ^_^ Anyway, I wanted to know if you have any tips on how to write different personalities? My characters (all of them) always end up with the same default personality that I fall back on. Thanks!

Thanks for your question, darling!  I think most of us have struggled with this – after all, we’re conditioned to one way of thinking, feeling, and acting for as long as we live.  That doesn’t necessarily mean we write characters like ourselves, though.  In fact, many of us have a “default character” that’s sassier than we are, sweeter than we are, or in some way different enough from us that we still feel like we’re writing a character.

The problem, then, isn’t that we can’t visualize a different personality than ours.  On the whole, we can.  What we’re missing are the small details that make it feel whole – otherwise, it’s like painting the same room six different colors and trying to pass it off as six different rooms.  Different dominant traits can’t hide the fact that you’re working with one template!

So the question we’re left with: what are the traits we’re missing?  And how can we change them to create a unique and whole personality?


Three Types of Character Traits

There are, as the title suggests, three major categories of personality traits as I see it: fundamental traits, acquired traits, and detrimental traits.  A well-rounded character needs some of each to be three-dimensional and realistic.

Fundamental Traits

The fundamental traits of a person’s character are not as simple as interests and preferences; they are the very base of all decisions and desires.  They are either learned in early life or developed over a long period of time, rooting deeply into the personality.  A few examples of fundamental personality traits include:

  • Upbringing – The word choice here is conscious, as upbringing encompasses many different aspects of a person’s development.  Consider who raised them, and with what morals and practices they were raised to adulthood.  Consider their influences, both familial, social, and in media; consider the relationships that were normalized during their development, as well as the living conditions (financially, emotionally, environmentally, etc.).  The people, places, emotions, and conflicts made common during a person’s developmental period are essential to their personality in adulthood.  This is why psychologists often draw present-day problems back to a person’s childhood memories – because those formative years can subconsciously dictate so much of a person’s future!
  • Values – These may not coincide with the values a person is raised to hold, but upbringing certainly has an influence on this. A person’s values will direct the course of their life through every decision, large and small.  You don’t need to outline everything your character believes is important – every moral and every law they agree/disagree with. But those values which stand above others will give your character purpose.  A few of my favorite examples are: Jane from Jane the Virgin (whose initial storyline is heavily based on her religion and desire for a beautiful love story, as well as her childhood influences who inspired these values) and Han Solo from Star Wars (whose character development rested upon his values shifting from money and gratification to more honorable things).
  • Beliefs – Different from values, beliefs are a more general set of guidelines for how a person believes things are supposed to be.  Beliefs can also be a source of great conflict, as a character tries to stay aligned with their beliefs despite other values or desires.  These beliefs can be established systems, like religion or politics; they can also include more personal belief systems, like nihilism or veganism.  A characters beliefs, like their values, can change over the course of the story – but even if a character is questioning one system of belief, like religion or pacifism, they should have other belief systems in place to govern some of their activity.
  • Reputation – A lot of human activity, whether consciously or not, is dictated by how others perceive them (or how they believe others perceive them).  There are two types of reputation: personal and passing.  For instance, a woman named Sally who gains a personal reputation of sleeping around will behave in reaction to this reputation – either sleeping around because everyone already expects it of her, or specifically not hooking up because she wants to shake this reputation, or developing a thicker skin to deal with the rumors until it passes.  A man named Billy who, because of his tattoos, bears a passing reputation as an intimidating man will either try to soften his demeanor with strangers, own up to the image, or at least learn to expect judgment from strangers as a consequence.
  • Self-Image – Also relevant to a person’s behavior is the way they perceive themselves, which can often have little to do with their reputation.  A lot of self-image is based on definitive moments or phases in the past.  For instance: for several years after I started wearing contacts and cutting my hair, I still saw myself, in dreams at night, with long hair and glasses.  One of my friends, similarly, could not seem to notice when boys would flirt with her during sophomore year – because she still saw herself as an awkward middle schooler with braces, and not as the charming cheerleader with the great smile.
    Inversely, self-image can be inflated, causing character to behave as though they are funnier, smarter, or more prepared than they truly are (see: the rest of my sophomore acquaintances).  This can be an overlooked character flaw opportunity – or flawportunity…

Originally posted by alliefallie


Acquired Traits

Now we move on to the acquired traits of personality, which are the ones you’re more likely to find on a character sheet or a list of “10 Questions for Character Development”, alongside a million other things like their zodiac sign and their spirit animal.  But the traits I’m about to outline are a little more relevant to a character’s behavior, and more importantly, how to make this behavior unique from other characters’ behavior.  The following traits will be learned by your characters throughout their life (and their story), and are more likely to shift and grow with time:

  • Interests – I know, I had to reach deep down into my soul to think of this one.  But it’s true!  Interests, both in childhood/adolescence and in adulthood, are an important part of a character’s personality and lifestyle.  Childhood interests both reveal something about the character (for instance: my nephew loves trains, Legos, and building, suggesting a future interest in construction or engineering) and create values that can last for a lifetime.  Current interests affect career choice, social circles, and daily activity for everyone.  Forgotten or rejected interests can be the source of pet peeves, fears, or bad memories. There’s a reason I’ll never play with Polly Pockets again, and it 100% has to do with bloody fingertips and a purse that wouldn’t open.
  • Sense of Humor – This can be a little hard to define, understandably.  If you were to ask me what my sense of humor is, I’d probably start with a few stupid memes, pass by Drake & Josh on the way, and somehow wind up telling you bad puns or quoting Chelsea Peretti’s standup comedy. A person’s sense of humor can be complex and contradictory!  Sometimes we just laugh at stuff because someone said it in a funny way.  But anyway, to help you boil this down to something useful: take a look at a few kinds of comedy and relate it to your character’s maturity level.  Do they laugh when someone lets out a toot?  Are they the kind of person to mutter, “That’s what she said,” or simply try not to laugh when something sounds dirty?  Can puns make them crack a smile?  Do they like political humor?  Do cat videos kill them?  Is their humor particularly dark?  Can the mere sound of someone else laughing make them laugh?  Figure out where your character’s sense of humor is, and you’ll feel closer to them already.
  • Pet Peeves – For every interest a person may have, and everything that makes them laugh, there’s something else that can piss them off, large- or small-scale.  Are they finnicky about their living space and neatness? Do they require a lot of privacy? Do certain sounds or behaviors drive them crazy?  What qualities are intolerable in a romantic interest for them? What kind of comments or beliefs make them roll their eyes?  If you need help, just try imagining their worst enemy – someone whose every word or action elicits the best eye-rolls and sarcastic remarks and even a middle finger or two – and ask yourself, what about this person makes them that mortal enemy?  What behaviors or standards make them despicable to your character?  That’s all it takes.
  • Skills – Everybody has them, and they’re not just something we’re born with.  Skills can be natural talent, sure, but they’re also cultivated from time, values, and interests.  What is your character okay at?  What are they good at?  What are they fantastic at?  Maybe they can cook.  Maybe they have a beautiful eye for colors.  Maybe they have an inherent sense of right and wrong that others admire. Maybe they’re super-athletic or incredibly patient or sharp as a tack or sweet as a cupcake.  Maybe they know how to juggle, or maybe they’re secretly the most likely of all their friends to survive a zombie apocalypse.  Where do they shine?  What would make someone look at them and think, “Wow, I wish I were them right now”?
  • Desires – A good way to “separate” one character from the next is to define what it is they want, and then use every other detail to dictate how they pursue that goal.  Every real person has a desire, whether they’ve defined it or not – whether it’s something huge, like fame or a family of five with triplet girls and a beach house on an island, or something small, like good grades for the semester.  These desires can cause a person to revise their values or forsake their morals; and these desires can conflict with other people’s desires, influencing how people interact with each other.  Remember that every character is living their own story, even if it’s not the story you’re telling.
  • Communication Style – A majorly overlooked character trait in pop fiction is unique communication styles.  Having every character feel comfortable arguing, or bursting out with the words, “I love you,” is unrealistic.  Having every character feel paralyzed at the idea of confronting a bully or being honest to their spouse is also unrealistic.  There should be a healthy mix of communicators in a group of characters. Some people are too softspoken to mouth off at their racist lab partner.  Some people wouldn’t see their girlfriend kissing another guy and just walk away without saying something.  Some people just don’t react to conflict by raising their voice; some people enjoy sharing their opinions or giving the correct answer in class.  Boldness, social skills, and emotional health all have a part to play in how people communicate their thoughts – so keep this in mind to create a more realistic, consistent character.
  • Emotional Expression – Along the same lines but not the same, emotional expression is more focal on feelings than thoughts.  If you’ve ever heard of the fight-or-flight response, the different types of anger, the stages of grief, or the five love languages, then you’re aware of different “classifications” of emotional expression and management.  Read up on some of those things, and think about how your character handles emotions like happiness, sadness, fear, anger, loneliness, paranoia, and so forth.

Detrimental Traits

While acquired traits are certainly more enjoyable to brainstorm during the creation process, detrimental traits are as important – or even more important – to the character’s wholeness as well as their role in the story.  Not only do these negative or limiting traits make your character realistic, relatable, and conflicted – they create a need for other characters and their strengths to move the plot forward.  A few examples of detrimental traits include:

  • Flaws – Character flaws are probably the first thing that came to your mind while reading this, but they’re the essence of the category.  Flaws in a character’s personality, morality, or behavior can be a source of character development; they set an individual on their own path and provide a unique motivation for them.  Having Character A struggle with sobriety while Character B learns to be a more patient mother can do a lot to separate their stories and personalities from each other.  Even if certain flaws don’t reach a point of growth, they create a third aspect to personality and force us, as writers, to be more creative with how our characters get from Point A to Point B, and what they screw up along the way.
  • Fears – Everyone has fears, whether we’re conscious of them or not – and I’m not talking about phobias or “things that give you shivers”.  Just like everyone has a primary motivation throughout life (romance, family, success, meaning, peace of mind, etc.), everyone has a fear behind that motivation (loneliness, failure, emptiness, anxiety).  We all have something we don’t want to happen places we never want to be and things we never want to do.  We’ve all been in situations that mildly bothered others but wildly affected us at the same time.  For me, it’s a lack of autonomy, or in any way being forced to do something or be somewhere against my will.
    What does this mean for me?  It means that when other people have nightmares about being chased by an axe murderer, I have nightmares about being kidnapped and locked up.  It means that I’m continually aware of my “escape plan” if something goes wrong in my living situation, and I’m hypersensitive to someone telling me, “You have to do this.”  It means I struggle to follow rules and usually don’t get along with authority figures because I have to assert my independence to them.  It’s irrational and continual and doesn’t just affect me in one situation; it subconsciously directs my steps if I let it.  That’s how real, guttural fears work. Phobias are only skin deep, and they don’t make you feel any closer to the character.

Originally posted by giantmonster

  • Secrets – Even goody two-shoes Amber from the swim team, with her blonde blonde hair and her good good grades, has a secret.  Everybody does, even if it’s not a purposeful, “I have a deep, dark secret,” sort of secret. We have things we don’t tell people, just because they’re embarrassing, or painful, or too deep to get into, or they don’t paint us in a good light.  While the secrets themselves tell a lot about a person, so do the reasons a person keeps a secret.  Hiding something out of shame suggests a person is prideful, or critical of themselves, or holds themselves to a higher standard than they hold others.  Hiding something painful suggests that the person struggles to handle sadness or regret, or that they feel uncomfortable showing raw emotion in front of loved ones. And so on and so forth.
  • Conflict – Whether internal, interpersonal, legal, moral, societal, or what have you, conflict will limit your character’s actions at every turn.  A story is nothing without conflict driving the plot in different directions and causing your character to rethink both their plans and their lifestyle.  Without Katniss’s moral conflict over killing other tributes, The Hunger Games would be the story of a girl who entered an arena, killed a lot of people, and lived the rest of her life rich and comfortable.  If Luke Skywalker didn’t have interpersonal conflict with Darth Vader, Star Wars would be the war-story of a guy who joined a rebellion and then… yeah.
  • Health – Physical, mental, and emotional health is a huge limiting factor for characters that often goes untouched, but it’s valuable nonetheless.  Not everyone has a clean bill of health and can jump off trains without pulling a muscle, go through a traumatic life experience without any hint of depression or anxiety, or watch a loved one die in gunfire and shove right on without emotional repercussions. Consider creating a character who’s not perfect – who isn’t perfectly in-shape or abled, or neurotypical or stable day-to-day, or completely clean and clear of residual heartache, unhealthy relationships, or bad emotional habits.  Don’t define them by these traits, of course – but don’t feel that you can’t write a character with health issues without writing a “sick character.”

So this post got ridiculously long, but I hope it works as a reference for you when creating unique characters.  Remember that you don’t need to outline all of this information to create an individual, realistic character.  These are just some relevant ideas to get you started!  It’s up to you, as the writer, to decide what’s necessary and what’s excessive for your creative process.

Still, I hope a majority of this is helpful to you!  If you have any more questions, be sure to send them in and we’ll get back to you :)  Good luck!

- Mod Joanna ♥️


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask us!

anonymous asked:

I love Kirishima. A lot. And I love your blog because it mainly focus on him. I love how he brightens the show and how great his character is. But the thing is I saw some of your posts shipping him with bakugo. I don't ship him with bakugo though. I like their friendship and all. I think it's the most beautiful progress I have seen in BNHA. Their dynamic pair is good. May I know why you ship them? And please don't hate me.

Reasons to Ship Bakushima

Since you already like their friendship and think they make a good dynamic pair, you probably have a good idea of why people like their relationship. There are a countless number of reasons to ship them and their relationship has so much going for them, so I feel like whatever answer I give won’t be enough. I’ll try my best to answer this. Maybe it’s best if I list some of the main reasons why I ship them. 

1. Kirishima is important to Bakugou’s character development. 

Early on, he encourages Bakugou to have friends and allies by being a friend and ally to Bakugou himself.

Kirishima does such a good job making himself a friend and equal to Bakugou that he becomes the only classmate Bakugou can accept being rescued by without hurting Bakugou’s pride. This is a huge step for Bakugou’s character development because it shows Bakugou can learn how to accept help from someone without his ego being bruised. 

The character development Kirishima gives Bakugou helps Bakugou become a better hero by encouraging Bakugou to be a nicer individual and to work with other people. 

2. Bakugou CARES about Kirishima. 

Usually Bakugou doesn’t give a crap if someone is sad. However, Bakugou has been shown multiple times trying to cheer Kirishima up when Kirishima is sad, which is something he hasn’t done for other classmates. Bakugou cares about someone besides himself, and the classmate Bakugou cares about the most is Kirishima. 

Bakugou doesn’t care about people like a hero should. As Bakugou learns to care about Kirishima, he can become capable of caring about other people, further showing how Kirishima helps Bakugou become a better hero.

3. Despite Kirishima admiring Bakugou and wanting to be his friend, Kirishima doesn’t let Bakugou walk all over him. 

He’ll tease Bakugou like any friend would, even if Bakugou doesn’t like it. 

And he doesn’t let Bakugou get away with shit. He understands Bakugou needs to improve his behavior and will call Bakugou out on his bad behavior. 

Kirishima won’t let Bakugou get away with not calling him by his name either. Kirishima not only wants Bakugou to be his friend, he also wants Bakugou to treat him with respect. Kirishima doesn’t want to be Bakugou’s minion. He wants to be his equal. 

4. This point goes without saying, but similar to how Bakugou cares about Kirishima, Kirishima REALLY cares about Bakugou. 

Kirishima is one of the people who is most worried for Bakugou when Class 1-A hears the villains are after Bakugou.

And despite the dangers for him and his classmates, Kirishima is willing to break the rules to rescue Bakugou because he is one of the students hurt most by Bakugou’s capture. 

Kirishima checks to see if Bakugou passed the hero license exam and is worried about Bakugou when he sees Bakugou doesn’t pass.

5. Bakugou respects Kirishima. 

Bakugou sees Kirishima as a useful ally because their Quirks work well together and is willing to accept Kirishima into his cavalry battle team as a result. Then during that cavalry battle, he listens to Kirishima when Kirishima tells Bakugou to calm down, and Bakugou even refers to Kirishima by his name, something Bakugou rarely does and only does with people he respects. 

Kirishima puts up a good fight against Bakugou during the Sports Festival, showing Bakugou that he’s more than just his hardening Quirk, making Bakugou respect him even more. 

Not only does Bakugou respect Kirishima enough to be rescued by him without hurting his pride, but Bakugou remembers words Kirishima told him months later. Kirishima told Bakugou he’d be unshakable during the cavalry battle, and then Bakugou recalls those exact words months later. Bakugou doesn’t remember things unless they’re important. The things Kirishima says have a huge impact on Bakugou.

Furthermore, Bakugou thinks Kirishima is so strong that he states Kirishima can be unbreakable like All Might. Considering how highly Bakugou thinks of All Might, that’s a huge compliment and shows how much Bakugou respects Kirishima’s abilities. 

6. Bakugou is good for Kirishima’s character growth. 

Kirishima looks up to Bakugou for his unwavering determination and strength and tries to be a strong hero more like Bakugou. When Kirishima expresses how little he thinks of his Quirk and abilities, Bakugou gives Kirishima advice and helps Kirishima create his new super move, Red Riot Unbreakable. 

As demonstrated by Red Riot Unbreakable, Bakugou helps give Kirishima conviction and a more unbreakable spirit, making Kirishima more of an unyielding wall, which will improve Kirishima’s hero career. Kirishima wouldn’t be the mighty brute force he is now without Bakugou. In addition, the things Bakugou says improve Kirishima’s confidence. For instance, Red Riot Unbreakable raised Kirishima’s confidence and makes him feel stronger, which is important for Kirishima’s self-esteem. Keep in mind, Bakugou usually says things to hurt and lower other people’s confidence, so it’s very remarkable that the things he says helps Kirishima’s confidence instead. 

Although, it’s difficult for Bakugou’s threats and insults to faze Kirishima anyway. 

Considering Kirishima’s low self-esteem, Bakugou is an important person who’ll help raise Kirishima’s confidence. In addition, both Bakugou and Kirishima suffer from painful inferiority complexes, with Bakugou’s inferiority complex manifesting into a superiority complex. They can both relate to their issues and help each other. 

Overall, Bakugou and Kirishima’s relationship gets lots of development throughout the series. They mean a lot to each other and help their characters grow. They’re arguably best friends. They’re so close that Iida automatically turns to Kirishima when asking about Bakugou’s whereabouts. 

I don’t expect this answer to convert you into a Bakushima shipper anon. It’s cool if you don’t ship it. This is a very loaded ask because there’s so much I can say about this. I don’t think this answer does this ship or their relationship justice because I can go on and on about why Bakugou and Kirishima are great for each other and why their relationship is important. If I didn’t list some reasons why I like them, then my answer would get disorganized and incoherent. By the way, thanks for asking this specific question. I’ve never really stated why I like Bakugou and Kirishima’s relationship, and it’s nice to finally get my thoughts out there. Although, I could still say more on the topic. 

See? This is the bullshit I’m talking about. I get it. We all get it guys, we’re all impatient about when it will come out, it’s been a while, yadda yadda yadda. But being a fucking asshole about it isn’t going to make the game come out faster.

The game is still in development you know why? Because it’s not fucking finished. Be it polish they need to add, fixing bugs around, or maybe working on part of Act 2 or maybe 3 even to make sure things do tie up at the end and there’s no programming mess that deletes your saved data, the WhatPumpkin team is working on the damn thing.

If it was a matter of, the game is done 100% and it’s not being released for some asinine reason, or like a bigger company that was waiting to release an already made game in Christmas, then yeah! Sure, go ahead, complain, tell them to release it already and stop making us wait. But this is not the case, the game is being MADE, and your incessant nagging about ‘when when when where’ only makes you look like entitled little children.

There was radio silence about Hiveswap for the longest time. Allegedly because of legal issues, with so, so very few updates. The game changed house early in development, the style switched from 3D to 2D, this game has had so many awful hiccups, and people were desperate to hear ANYTHING about it. So once they think they got the game pinned down, they release a trailer with what they think will be the release date- Except it’s not. Because Game Development can be messy and this isn’t a Triple-A Company that will rush a videogame to match some date and schedule and then just slowly patch a buggy mess of a game, this is a group of people working together on a passion project about a setting both the author and many of themselves are in love with.

So sure, they missed the original deadline. Then they put out another trailer without a specific date, publicly said they will not say a date until they are 100% certain it will be then as to not get people’s hopes up, have released 2 Grubbles songs plus a bunch of snippets about the OST of the game, have interviewed like 10 people at WhatPumpkin for us to see the team behind the game, figures we already knew about in the Fandom, people that aren’t into Homestuck, professionals, amateurs, we even got concept art, the process of drawing backgrounds, the animation…

Have any of you complaining read the Interviews? With everyone mentioning their pride about the game? Talking about how excited they are to show you things about it? Of fucking course they want to release it already too, but they CAN’T. They. Cannot. Release. It. Yet. And none of your complaining is going to make it speed up. You know what crying like a baby is going to do and shouting the interviews don’t matter what will result in? Radio silence again. Would you prefer that? Total uncertainty about anything regarding the game than at LEAST seeing something?

And I get it. I get it’s been a long long time. I get some of you actually paid money for the Kickstarter. But you’re literally doing what Game Dev companies nowadays are doing all the time. You’re so centred on getting your hands on something early and meeting a stupid deadline that you’re willing to kill a project and receive a mess instead. The only constructive criticism above is the one mentioning they’d like to hear about the progress of the game itself and not the Dev Team. And you know why it will never happen?

Because they did it already. They thought their game was at 99% and announced a release date, then it backfired on them. They will NEVER tell us, ‘Oh, the game is JUST about to come out!’ because if they bump into another hiccup they’re going to have to delay it. And the last time that happened, y’all started to scream at them to just release it already and disregarded any show of good faith because you apparently can’t wait a single second longer after five years of waiting.

The most grating thing is people STILL STUCK on the January 2017 date have obviously not read any post they made talking about not wanting to get people’s hopes up until they’re 100% certain it’s just around the corner, and yet they keep popping up on every single piece of media they release about the game like bots bent on spreading negativity.

Be glad you’re even getting this game in the first place after the hell it’s gone through with The Odd Gentlemen and an ungrateful following.

5

The Isle has implemented a new feature that allows you to hit the ingame record key, and it will record everything that happens on the entire map, whether your dino-character is in the area or not. You can then later go back and zoom through the entire map in first person and find random epic encounters. You can do slow motion, freeze, etc. It is a great tool if you like to take awesome screenshots/videos of a world of dinosaurs.

Y’all I Think I Got Sonic Forces Figured Out

Okay so I know we are all over the moon about the trailers and game play videos that we have gotten these past few days, but I honestly think that we have been glaring over a pretty CRUCIAL detail from the classic sonic game play video 

Think about what we have heard from the Sega Officials, this is not a Sonic Generations sequel. But how can this be if classic sonic is in the game? How are Sonic’s past enemies here alive and ready to fight? How is it not akin to generations if classic Sonic is alive and here?

But what is he isn’t?

What if this classic sonic isn’t the one from generations at all? But instead, from another dimension? Now I suppose Dr. Eggman may just be referring ro another state of time, but I don’t think the connection stops there. For the most obvious question, how in the WORLD did Eggman take over the world without Sonic to stop him? Its the focus of the game but H O W? In colors, generations and lost world. sonic had made stabs at Eggman claiming “Its like its his job to stop him” because, well? It is. Eggman knows this. He knows it far too well. In generations he went back in time to try to right his wrongs, to redo his errors and end Sonic but time and time again it didn’t happen. So what if Dr.Eggman instead decided to look beyond his world, to another dimension, with another Eggman? But why stop there? Why not bring forth a dimension where Sonic failed? Not only that, but a universe where Chaos destroyed Station Square. A world where Metal Sonic won the race on Starlight Speedway. A world where Shadow never helped to defeat the bio-lizard. A world where the deadly six drained the world of its life? This would explain why Shadow has suddenly switched over to the dark side, why Metal Sonic is still functional, why Zavok is alive and why Chaos is in his earlier forms before he became perfect chaos. 

 Of course, like the Time Eater, Eggman wouldn’t be able to do this on his own, as we have seen with our new villain: 

Now as menacing as he appears, these cubes are so….out of place. It’s strange on why he has all these cubes, and why the trailer makes them look as dramatic as it can. Showing our new villain SURROUNDED by them and then ending the trailer with him hurling them at you. It’s odd. So what are they if the cubes are so important? Well to put it simply,

They’re different dimensions 

Whoever this guy is, he is in control of countless dimensions, more than enough to combine and design a whole new terrible reality. A whole new HORRIFIC dimension, where Sonic has failed, and Eggman reigns supreme. What is the name of this devious villain?

INFINITE 

As in..Infinite worlds?

The clues are right in front of us, and all we had to do was pay attention. The trailer certainly wants to get the point across

Now, I may be jumping the gun on this one, with my head of fan fiction type ideals, and perhaps this new villain will just be connected to whoever you create as your own character, (either it be an evil twin or something like that) but who would want to do this? Who would want to bring total destruction onto a world full of peaceful people? Who would want to see the world burn and fall apart right before their eyes because of their wrong doings? Who would want to see people of the resistance fail hopelessly, desperate to save their once beautiful world? Who would want to team up with Eggman to decimate the world? Who hates Sonic so much that he would want nothing more than to force him to watch as his legacy, friends,home,universe fall apart? WHO IS INFINITE? Well I may be wrong, but there’s only one person who can and will

From the timeline that was erased. From the universe you reversed in Sonic 06. From the world you fought so hard to save and redo, rewriting reality so you could get the happy ending. 

Now, its his turn 

On a side note, Sonic Team knows that sonic 06 was a disaster, and make reference to it in the Sonic story episode in Lego Dimensions. Pretty coincidental or foreshadowing? Some other things we can consider as well could be that in 2012 we first heard rumors of a Sonic game called “Sonic Dimensions” The rumor said that we would be traveling to other universes with different color Sonics that had their own personality. My personal favorite, is a promise of a boss fight of an evil Amy Rose, wishing for Sonic’s pain rather than love. Now the rumor as we know now is false and was debunked and this could very well be a coincidence. However, this rumor broke out in 2012, a year or so after Generations and 1 year before Lost world released in 2013. I think we can safely say that Lost world was at the very least in early stages of production during or sometime after Generations especially with its ambitious game play style. It would have taken more than 2 years to make, with the game play style and everything else. This means, Sonic Forces could had possibly be in the early stages of development a little before Lost World, playing on the idea of different universes.I think it’s also possible that Sonic Forces may had been delayed at some point because of Sonic Boom’s games and tv show, since its not being advertised at the 25th anniversary game. Also is a pleasant time to remember that this happened:

Due to Gravity Falls’s more dark story telling, I think its safe to assume that Alex had some kind of influence on Sonic Forces’s story. Either way, 

We are in for a long deserved fantastic Sonic Game my friends. 

“Don’t get me wrong, I love my son, and both Mark and I were thrilled about his early cognitive development, but it can sometimes be overwhelming when our infant is screaming things like, “Soda! There must be soda! Soda for me, the boy! Soda for the boy! I am the boy!” in the deafening baritone voice of a furious middle-aged man at all hours of the day and night.”

Creating a Day Worth Living

1. Get up early

2. Develop an attitude of gratitude

3. Invest in what matters

4. Have fun

5. Do something for others

6. Get out in the sun

7. Exercise – at least a little

8. Try something new

9. Don’t be afraid to take chances

10. Look for the humor in life.

thewrap.com
'Walking Dead' Star Steven Yeun Is Writing and Producing His Own Projects to Create Better Roles For Asian Actors - TheWrap

“I think that if I had not been Asian, I probably would have a whole plethora of roles, at least to audition for, but it’s just not what has been written” he tells TheWrap

Steven Yeun took a big leap of faith back in 2005, deciding that instead of pursuing a proper — and lucrative — career, he’d instead move to Chicago to try his hand at acting.

The risks here were twofold: First, it is of course remarkably difficult to forge and sustain a career as a working actor — and it is exponentially more difficult to do so as an Asian-American.

Exhibit A: Yeun is one of the most important cast members on the biggest show on television, “The Walking Dead,” and he’s still fighting hard to earn the sort of auditions that reflect his success.

“People ask, ‘So, how are the roles now? You must be getting so many.’ And it’s like, I don’t know if you know, but I’m Asian still,” Yeun told TheWrap earlier in July, laughing. “It’s not a complaint, that’s just how it is now, and I have to forge my own path through it and see that through. I think that if I had not been Asian, I probably would have a whole plethora of roles, at least to audition for, but it’s just not what has been written.”

It almost seems as if Hollywood is going out of its way to avoid Asian actors, when movies based on mangas are cast with white leads (see: “Speed Racer” and “Dragonball”), Asian movies being remade with white actors (“Oldboy”), and white actors actually playing Asians (“Cloud Atlas”and “The Last Airbender”).

Yeun’s first film role, as a scientist and best friend to Michael Pitt in “I Origins,” is a good start. The part doesn’t cast him as a nerdy sidekick, as so many other scripts call for; Yeun’s Kenny is a smart and slick core character who offers a lot of the comic relief in Mike Cahill‘s very serious film, undercutting the self-seriousness that Pitt presents.

The freedom to choose how he’d play a character — in this instance, he wanted Kenny to be refined — is not a luxury that Asian actors often enjoy. So instead of scouring scripts and casting calls for chances to quietly tweak cliches, Yeun is simply developing his own material.

First comes an adaptation of Kang Chol-Hwan's memoir “The Aquariums of Pyongyang,” which among other htings, details the author’s childhood years living in a North Korean concentration camp. Yeun will executive produce and star in the film, playing the author.

There are several other projects in the pipeline for Yeun, as well, early in development.

“We’ve been working on some comedy stuff and in cartoon form, as well,” he revealed. “And then there are some film ideas that have always been batting around my head. I just want to definitely stretch that muscle, because you can’t just wait for other people to give it to you.”

10 People You Wish You Met from 100 Years of NASA’s Langley

Something happened 100 years ago that changed forever the way we fly. And then the way we explore space. And then how we study our home planet. That something was the establishment of what is now NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Founded just three months after America’s entry into World War I, Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory was established as the nation’s first civilian facility focused on aeronautical research. The goal was, simply, to “solve the fundamental problems of flight.”

From the beginning, Langley engineers devised technologies for safer, higher, farther and faster air travel. Top-tier talent was hired. State-of-the-art wind tunnels and supporting infrastructure was built. Unique solutions were found.

Langley researchers developed the wing shapes still used today in airplane design. Better propellers, engine cowlings, all-metal airplanes, new kinds of rotorcraft and helicopters, faster-than-sound flight - these were among Langley’s many groundbreaking aeronautical advances spanning its first decades.

By 1958, Langley’s governing organization, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA, would become NASA, and Langley’s accomplishments would soar from air into space.

Here are 10 people you wish you met from the storied history of Langley:

Robert R. “Bob” Gilruth (1913–2000) 

  • Considered the father of the U.S. manned space program.
  • He helped organize the Manned Spacecraft Center – now the Johnson Space Center – in Houston, Texas. 
  • Gilruth managed 25 crewed spaceflights, including Alan Shepard’s first Mercury flight in May 1961, the first lunar landing by Apollo 11 in July 1969, the dramatic rescue of Apollo 13 in 1970, and the Apollo 15 mission in July 1971.

Christopher C. “Chris” Kraft, Jr. (1924-) 

  • Created the concept and developed the organization, operational procedures and culture of NASA’s Mission Control.
  • Played a vital role in the success of the final Apollo missions, the first manned space station (Skylab), the first international space docking (Apollo-Soyuz Test Project), and the first space shuttle flights.

Maxime “Max” A. Faget (1921–2004) 

  • Devised many of the design concepts incorporated into all U.S.  manned spacecraft.
  • The author of papers and books that laid the engineering foundations for methods, procedures and approaches to spaceflight. 
  • An expert in safe atmospheric reentry, he developed the capsule design and operational plan for Project Mercury, and made major contributions to the Apollo Program’s basic command module configuration.

Caldwell Johnson (1919–2013) 

  • Worked for decades with Max Faget helping to design the earliest experimental spacecraft, addressing issues such as bodily restraint and mobility, personal hygiene, weight limits, and food and water supply. 
  • A key member of NASA’s spacecraft design team, Johnson established the basic layout and physical contours of America’s space capsules.

William H. “Hewitt” Phillips (1918–2009) 

  • Provided solutions to critical issues and problems associated with control of aircraft and spacecraft. 
  • Under his leadership, NASA Langley developed piloted astronaut simulators, ensuring the success of the Gemini and Apollo missions. Phillips personally conceived and successfully advocated for the 240-foot-high Langley Lunar Landing Facility used for moon-landing training, and later contributed to space shuttle development, Orion spacecraft splashdown capabilities and commercial crew programs.

Katherine Johnson (1918-) 

  • Was one of NASA Langley’s most notable “human computers,” calculating the trajectory analysis for Alan Shepard’s May 1961 mission, Freedom 7, America’s first human spaceflight. 
  • She verified the orbital equations controlling the capsule trajectory of John Glenn’s Friendship 7 mission from blastoff to splashdown, calculations that would help to sync Project Apollo’s lunar lander with the moon-orbiting command and service module. 
  • Johnson also worked on the space shuttle and the Earth Resources Satellite, and authored or coauthored 26 research reports.

Dorothy Vaughan (1910–2008) 

  • Was both a respected mathematician and NASA’s first African-American manager, head of NASA Langley’s segregated West Area Computing Unit from 1949 until 1958. 
  • Once segregated facilities were abolished, she joined a racially and gender-integrated group on the frontier of electronic computing. 
  • Vaughan became an expert FORTRAN programmer, and contributed to the Scout Launch Vehicle Program.

William E. Stoney Jr. (1925-) 

  • Oversaw the development of early rockets, and was manager of a NASA Langley-based project that created the Scout solid-propellant rocket. 
  • One of the most successful boosters in NASA history, Scout and its payloads led to critical advancements in atmospheric and space science. 
  • Stoney became chief of advanced space vehicle concepts at NASA headquarters in Washington, headed the advanced spacecraft technology division at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, and was engineering director of the Apollo Program Office.

Israel Taback (1920–2008) 

  • Was chief engineer for NASA’s Lunar Orbiter program. Five Lunar Orbiters circled the moon, three taking photographs of potential Apollo landing sites and two mapping 99 percent of the lunar surface. 
  • Taback later became deputy project manager for the Mars Viking project. Seven years to the day of the first moon landing, on July 20, 1976, Viking 1 became NASA’s first Martian lander, touching down without incident in western Chryse Planitia in the planet’s northern equatorial region.

John C Houbolt (1919–2014) 

  • Forcefully advocated for the lunar-orbit-rendezvous concept that proved the vital link in the nation’s successful Apollo moon landing. 
  • In 1963, after the lunar-orbit-rendezvous technique was adopted, Houbolt left NASA for the private sector as an aeronautics, astronautics and advanced-technology consultant. 
  • He returned to Langley in 1976 to become its chief aeronautical scientist. During a decades-long career, Houbolt was the author of more than 120 technical publications.

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Looking for picture book recommendations

I think that picture books with disabled characters are probably really important, but I don’t know of many.

I’m looking for books that are *not* disability awareness books, but books where disability is just part of the world.

Eg: I saw a picture book once that was about going to the doctor, and one of the people working in the office was an adult wheelchair user. She wasn’t sick, she was just at work working. 

Does anyone know what that book is called? Or other picture books where disabled characters exist but the story isn’t about disability awareness?