early 17th

Stefano Maderno (1576-1636)
“The Martyrdom of Saint Cecilia” (1600)
Marble
Located in the Church of St. Cecilia, Rome, Italy

Tradition has it that the statue represents the position in which St Cecilia’s body was found.

3

Early 17th Century Combination warhammer and warpick/six shot gun.  

Has six barrels concealed on it for six shots.  The head contains five barrels, their muzzles concealed by a hinged cover forming the edge of the hammer. The topmost barrel is ignited by a matchlock fitted on one side of the head, its mechanism concealed by a brass plate cut out and engraved in the form of a lion. The second barrel has a wheellock ignition system, the mechanism of which occupies most of the outer surface of the opposite side of the axe-head. There is a tubular extension to the pan of the wheellock intended to hold a length of match which would be ignited by the flash of the priming pan and then withdrawn to ignite the three remaining barrels. A sixth barrel, also hand-ignited, is concealed within the haft.

Part of the Royal Armouries Collection in the United Kingdom

Pieter Claesz (1597-1660)
“Vanitas. Still life” (1630)
Dutch Golden Age

Vanitas is a category of symbolic works of art, the Latin noun vānĭtās (gen. -ātis) means “emptiness”, from the Latin adjective vanus, meaning empty, and refers to in this context to the traditional Christian view of earthly life and the worthless nature of all earthly goods and pursuits.

6

In the early hours of July 17th 1918 a family and four faithful servants waited in a dim-lit cellar in a house called “The house of special purpose”. There they were told that they had to pose for a family photo to prove they were still alive .  This family was no other than the family who once ruled Russia. The father was the ex-tsar of Russia, who was a weak ruler but he was a gentle and kind man who loved his family. The mother was descended from Queen Victoria’s bloodline who had a tough childhood after the lost of her mother and baby sister at a young age. Which shaped her into a shy woman. They had five children who were definition of innocence itself. The four beautiful daughters : One was intelligent, one was dutiful, one was brave and one was able to make all frowns turn into a smile. The youngest of the five was the delicate little boy who was originally set to rule Russia someday but that never came to be. And finally the four servants who stuck with them through thick and thin. After waiting, guards started to fill the room and there was no photo to be taken but instead a death sentence was read out. In the blink of an eye bullets ricocheted off the walls and the echo of screams filled the room. After the gunfire, the children and some of the servants were still alive so they were brutally shot/bayoneted to death. In total it took 20-30 minutes to kill all 11 people in that cellar. 

This happened 99 years ago today, may they all rest in peace.

Silver Pocket Watch from Scotland dated to 1615 on display at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh

Made by the famous Scottish watchmaker David Ramsay who moved to England with King James VI/I and was probably gifted by James to his favourite at the time, the Earl of Somerset. It is recorded that James fell for the young Earl of Somerset, then Robert Carr, when he was injured at a Joust.

The interior of the lid bears the Order of the Garter motto Honi soit qui mal y pense which in Old French can translate to “Shame be to him who thinks evil of it.”

anonymous asked:

Could you talk about early 1700's fashion? Specifically 1715-1725! Like what differences there were from, for instance, the more common 18th century clothing more typically found such as 1770's.

OMG! Excellent question!

We all have wondered what happened to go from here:

Originally posted by mozarlin

to here:

Originally posted by empress-of-awesomeness

I’m not sure if I should make a post for menswear and one for womenswear or a single post with the very key silhouettes by decade from 1690s to 1720s or 30s.

I think tomorrow I’d post it :) I wanna make it short and very clear so you all could use it as reference for the first quarter of the 18th century (maybe if that post gets quite good and nice I’ll make one for each quarter of the century!)