early 17th

3

Early 17th Century Combination warhammer and warpick/six shot gun.  

Has six barrels concealed on it for six shots.  The head contains five barrels, their muzzles concealed by a hinged cover forming the edge of the hammer. The topmost barrel is ignited by a matchlock fitted on one side of the head, its mechanism concealed by a brass plate cut out and engraved in the form of a lion. The second barrel has a wheellock ignition system, the mechanism of which occupies most of the outer surface of the opposite side of the axe-head. There is a tubular extension to the pan of the wheellock intended to hold a length of match which would be ignited by the flash of the priming pan and then withdrawn to ignite the three remaining barrels. A sixth barrel, also hand-ignited, is concealed within the haft.

Part of the Royal Armouries Collection in the United Kingdom

anonymous asked:

Could you talk about early 1700's fashion? Specifically 1715-1725! Like what differences there were from, for instance, the more common 18th century clothing more typically found such as 1770's.

OMG! Excellent question!

We all have wondered what happened to go from here:

Originally posted by mozarlin

to here:

Originally posted by empress-of-awesomeness

I’m not sure if I should make a post for menswear and one for womenswear or a single post with the very key silhouettes by decade from 1690s to 1720s or 30s.

I think tomorrow I’d post it :) I wanna make it short and very clear so you all could use it as reference for the first quarter of the 18th century (maybe if that post gets quite good and nice I’ll make one for each quarter of the century!)

Pieter Claesz (1597-1660)
“Vanitas. Still life” (1630)
Dutch Golden Age

Vanitas is a category of symbolic works of art, the Latin noun vānĭtās (gen. -ātis) means “emptiness”, from the Latin adjective vanus, meaning empty, and refers to in this context to the traditional Christian view of earthly life and the worthless nature of all earthly goods and pursuits.

jamestown

tonight, a show called jamestown starts airing on sky in the uk. it’s amazing from start to finish and it deserves so much attention for so many reasons:

  • set in the early 17th century
  • about british women who were sent to colonise jamestown, virginia
  • the horrors of colonialism do not go unaddressed
  • good, respectful representation of the native americans
  • and they are all actually played by native americans!!!!!
  • the female leads are really well written
  • fiesty irish barmaid! scheming rich bitch! soft gentle farm wife!
  • strong female friendships! healthy platonic male/female relationships!
  • the supporting characters are great
  • nothing terrible happens just for the sake of the ~historical drama~
  • cinematography is absolutely stunning
  • covers so much history of the era, from witchcraft to slavery
  • made by the company who did downton and the big budget is apparent
  • the first episode really just establishes the situation so it’s worth waiting for episode two to really get a feel for it
  • warning: there is a rape in the first episode, but it is not gratuitous and is not exploitatively used as a plot device. it’s handled really well.
Folk-lore as the True history of Witches


What has come to my mind recently is the nature of our historic understanding of witchcraft/cunning craft/etc as practiced in Europe over the course of the past 200 or so years. We base much of our knowledge, and further more most of the pages of the known literature, on the testimonies of parish priests, inquisitors and confessions often made under duress and torture. This body of knowledge has become, for the worse of history, the basis in which contemporary craft practice has been rooted. It is a framework of Christianity, a universe predicated on a savior, and a god who forbids such acts in law. An Abrahamic cult brought to the British Isles by the Roman in the 6th century. A patriarchy of knowledge control and subjugation.

Yet there exists, starting in the early 17th century, a profound body of knowledge that is not derived from tortures or confessions but on stories and knowledge freely given amongst locals in villages and towns. It is the body of what we now call ethnographic study, but is most commonly known as folklore. Starting in 1878 The Folk Lore Society in London began publishing a series of ethnographic studies, both in magazine and book format. But such folkloric study goes back several centuries before to men from the Brothers Grimm, Thomas Crofton Croker, Dalyell, Henderson, Kirk, Lady Wilde, and many others over a span of 300+ years. People who went into the pubs and gardens and talked to the real people of these places. Who listened and wrote down the stories of warding off beings and banishing dead souls. The instructions for curing illness and the nature of laying on hands and second sight.

This body of knowledge is a directly transmitted oral testimony, storytelling and folk beliefs handed down within families and gathered together by the folklorists and antiquarians from across regions of the British Isles and Europe. There are hundreds of books of these beliefs, many with detailed descriptions of spells to attack, to ward off spirits, to bind and banish and drive forth. Often listing exact components of charms and dances. Studies on the nature of folk magic in Scottish highlands, on horse magic in East Anglia, of the witch bottles and warding wands of Wales, and endless stream of valid information on the flowing tradition of folk magic as a living practice in the UK over the past half of a millennia. As well as documenting the exact pronunciation of regional words, curses, and spirits terminology, often with a glossary!

And yet this body of knowledge is almost completely overlooked in the contemporary literature on witchcraft practice. Which instead relies on the testament of Church torturers as to what was said, on the scant testimonies of victims of a system of abjuration pointed against herbal healers and common folk practitioners, more often than not elderly widows whose properties could be confiscated by the Church warden.

Its time for a rethink of our understanding of the nature of folk magic. How it is the very essence of true witch practice and is at its heart older and truer a practice that those tainted by the narrative of the Church over the past thousand years of attempted suppression. We must dig into this lost literature, much of which is available online for free as pdfs hidden on archive.org and in google books.


[I intend to post a list in the near future compiling links to some of the better documents of contemporary folk practice, particularly that from the UK.]