ean

all i want is for a certain cryptid hunter to actually pull a d.ean wi.nchester and save a certain possessed youth minister from the demon controlling his body and rising this shit cult, dragging him out of the dungeon and have mary being actual m.ary wi.nchester with rock salt and blades ready to bring them away ; gimme joseph and robert coming to terms with their feelings and joseph and mary to restore that friendship they used to have before being arranged together in marriage has ruined them.

gimme them trying to get ready because they know the demon wants his true vessel back.

anonymous asked:

do Eans count too? Bc I knew an Ean who like was SATAN SPAWN OMG like when I was in 5th grade he rubbed his dick like all over the handle on my roller backpack and sang "gummy bears" while he was doing it IT WAS FUCKING HELL

…….I kind of wish I didn’t have to read that but I did so now you all have to read it too

PSA: Glitter is Bad for the Environment

Hello, folks!

I’ve been reading a lot of blogs where people incorporate glitter into their spellwork. And glitter is 100% magickal, but it is also 100% MADE OF PLASTIC. Plastic, as you may know, takes 100s to 1,000s of years to decompose.

The cheap glitter you buy in those little tubes? It’s made of tiny pieces of plastic.

BUT THERE ARE AMAZING ALTERNATIVES!!
- Mica glitter is made of crushed up rocks! That’s right, ROCKS! What could be better for spellwork! You know what’s even better, depending on where you live? Mica can easily be found outside and it is super easy to MAKE YOUR OWN MICA GLITTER FOR FREE! Ever wonder what makes makeup so shimmery? It’s mica powder.
- Edible Glitter is made from plant starches and plant material. Meaning, it’s great for the environment. Bonus: YOU CAN EAN IT! Great for kitchen witchcraft!!

So, before you buy a tiny, sparkly tube of cheap, plastic glitter, please think about where it came from. And, also, think about where all of that glitter is going to end up.

I used to love glitter before I found out it was made of plastic. Now, I collect mica and make my own mica glitter! When the weather warms and there isn’t a blizzard going on, maybe I can do a tutorial to show what I do. It’s super easy and fun!

how to pronounce french

what to pronounce as a set :

- en / an / ean / em : like in Jean-Paul, temps (je vois la vie en rose)

- in / un / ain / ein : “1” Alain Delon (c’est un endroit)

- er / ai / ai(en)t / é / et : “é”, not “eee-rrr” (like in champs élysées palapalapa)

- ou : “ou”, not “ooo-uuu” (à minuit ou à midi, il y a tout ce que vous voulez)

- o / au(x) / eau(x) : o (aux champs élysées)

- eu : le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain (here at 1:33)

- gn : “nieu”, ex : montagne (mountain, f) : montanieu

- on : “on”, not “ooo-nnn” (bonjour, Paris!)

- eil / eille : eyy (bouteille at 0:50)


what NOT to pronounce :

1/ the last letters :

- -s, for nouns and verbs : les voitures (the cars) > lé voitur

- -z : nez (nose, m) > né, entrez (come in!) > entré

- -t : le chat (the cat, m) > le cha, tout (everything) > tou

- -d : lourd (heavy, m) > lour / prétend (pretends, 3PS) > préten

- -ps : temps (time/weather, m) : ten / printemps (spring, m) : printen

- -x : bijoux (jewels, m) : bijou / beaux (beautiful, pl m) : bo

- -e : arbre (tree, m) : arbr / chaise (chair, f) : chéz

2/ other letters :

- h- : hêtre (beech, m), humain (human, m), hérisson (hedgehog, m)

- -s-, sometimes : if you see a word with a ô inside, that accent was very likely an s put just after the o (hostel, hospital) ; if you ever see those words in a french text, you are not supposed to pronounce those -s-

- -d-, sometimes, in set expressions : la grand roue (the big wheel) > la gran rou, la grand-mère (the grandmother) > la gran mèr…


the S problem :

“s” can be said either “ss” > Frank Sinatra, or “z” > let’s go to the zoo

- if it’s the first letter, s- is a “ss” > sucre, m (sugar) : ssukr

- “sc” and “ls” together make also “ss” > fils, m (son) : fiss, scie, f (saw) : ssi

- “ss” are “ss”, no shit > poisson, m (fish) : poisson

- a final -s (NB : for a not-verb/not-noun) can be either “ss” or mute : tous as an adjectif indéfini, a comparative, a superlative or a negative = mute (il n’y a plu(s) de pain (there’s no more bread), c’est la plu(s) gentille (she’s the nicest)) ; as a pronom indéfini = “ss” (tous”s” ces hommes)

- when a word finishes with -s and the next starts with a vowel, you make the liaison : vous avez (plural you have) : vou zavé, les éléphants : lé zéléfan


the C problem :

“c” can be said either “ss” > science, f : ssienss, or “k” > carie, f (cavity) : kari

- c+a : “k” > café, m (coffee), cauchemar, m (nightmare) “cochmar”

- c+e : “ss” > cercle, m (circle), céleri, m (celery)

- c+h : ch (no shite) > chaussette, f (sock), chaud, adj (warm) “cho” ; exceptions : orchestre (m), charisme (m), schizophrénie (f), chlore (f, chlorine), choeur (m, chorus), chorale (f, choir), orchidée (f), psychologue (ep), archéologue (ep), chrétien-ne (christian)… : “k”

- c+i : “ss” > citrouille, f (pumpkin), citron, m (lemon)

- c+l : “k” > clé, f (key), classeur, m (binder)

- c+o : “k” > coquin, m (naughty) “cokin”, copain/pine (buddy) “copin”

- c+r : “k” > croquer (to bite), crétin-e (giant moron)

- c+u : “k” > culotte, f (panties), cuir, m (leather)


the G problem :

“g” can be either pronounced ‘softly’ > intelligent-e (smart), as in “jean” (w/o the d), or ‘hardly’ > ex : bague (f, ring), as in “game”

- g+e / g+i / g+y : soft G > gynécologue, gentil-le (nice), imaginaire

- g+a / g+o / g+u / g+consonant : hard G > gaffe (f, blunder), grammaire (f)


the annoying signs situation :

- ¨ : pronounce the two vowels separately : maïs “ma-iss” (m, corn), haïr (to hate) “a-ir”, Noël (m, Christmas) “no-él”

- ç : ss > maçon (bricklayer), français-e (french)

- oe / ae : “e” > oeuf (m, egg) “euf”, coeur (m, heart) “keur”, Laetitia “Létissia”

- ^ : orally I don’t make any difference, it’s often used to make a difference between words with the same spelling (dû/du, tache/tâche), the end


if you want to hear those sets :