dylan byrne

medium.com
Musicians with Books As Good as Their Albums
It comes as no surprise that musicians and writers are of a similar breed. For artists of language mining emotion, penning songs and music…
By Strand Book Store

Load up on these reads for your weekend at Coachella. 

9

Look, Nick, I’m sure you’re very popular with the nineteen year olds at the University of Phoenix, with your southern drawl, and the blonde hair, and this whole thing ya got going on, but I gotta tell you, this is just never gonna happen.

oh hello there, a bunch of my favourite musicians

George Ezra

Originally posted by geoff-ezra

first impressions : I was in the uni./college pub with a bunch of friends when ‘Listen to the Man’ was on, and the MV was playing on the TV. & I was like ‘Ian McKellan sings now?’, and a couple of fans (among friends) were like ‘No, it’s George Ezra, that young lad’. & I being completely ignorant and annoying, I went ‘No wayyy. No. Oh, hell no. Is it? Oh lord, it’s the young guy, and he’s got a voice of golden caramel-ey goodness.’

eventual, & inevitable addiction : ‘Budapest’ & ‘Blame It On Me’, & his cover of ‘Girl From The North Country’ (Bob Dylan) sealed the deal. I love Bob Dylan, and had a phase where I’d put his music on repeat and just chill in my room, probably painting/sketching/doodling; I think that was when I was in sixth forms; at the same time when I’d pretend to enjoy club music, and like get hella drunk to ‘feel better’. Oh heck, how I wish I was a radical feminist earlier. 


Hozier

Originally posted by cozierwithhozier

first impressions : I think I heard ‘Take Me To Church’ in a pub when I was out with friends. I was also stuffing my purse with complimentary ‘Kodaline’ postcards when I heard it. & then, I think my first favourites from Hozier were : ‘Sedated’ and ‘From Eden’.

eventual, & inevitable addiction : I listened to his album a lot while going through a strange phase of winter when I had mysterious, severe abdominal and back pains, and of which led me to stay in bed a lot. I don’t think I ever stopped listening to it from then on, to the operation, post-operation, now, and still. Oh & even still, after 2 amazing Hozier concerts. ‘Jackie & Wilson’ will always hold a special place in my heart (y’know those sort of clingy but lovely songs), it’s like my anti-depressant pill in the form of a song (not like I actually take any anti-depressant drugs).


The Tallest Man on Earth

Originally posted by toctocpiopio

first impressions : I can’t remember when I started listening to this wonderful man, but it was definitely during my pre-England (I don’t know why I say pre-England as if I’m some kind of archaic character from some dust-covered history book) period. I think it was somewhere around my discovering-Nietzsche-and-being-mind-blown period. I love every album he has out. Something about his voice, makes me feel like I can be who I want to be. Them lovely feels.

eventual, & inevitable addiction : I do half-consciously make sure that I have access to his music wherever I go. Except when I had that impromptu trip in the Swedish forests; I was conserving phone battery. His latest album, ‘Dark Bird Is Home’ (’Beginners’ is a great song to start with) gives me all the feels with a nostalgic kick. I hate nostalgia (or anything nostalgic) most of the times, but this one’s an exception. Nostalgia’s a dirty liar; might even get that tattooed on me someday. 


Florence + The Machine

Originally posted by thebakerswifi

first impressions : I went on a streak of listening to all powerful female singers sort of thing, the early beginnings of getting comfortable with my feminist self. It was kind of an ‘Alanis Morisette’ and related artists sort of musical trip. Somehow I landed on the magical realms of Florence Welch, and it’s been pretty amazing. I was in high school, and was in that weird, violent, somewhat experimental, unrefined, and so-called romantic relationships kind of mess. I dare say that her music lifted me up from the mess, like a hippie goddess offering a hand covered in glitter, saying ‘c’mon child, it’s time to rise’.

eventual, & inevitable addiction : There are times when I, allowing myself to not give an eff to everything, would lie back, and put the acoustic version ‘You’ve Got The Love’ on repeat. I’ll just casually confess that I’m pretty much an atheist (& a total Stephen Hawking fangirl - so you get the idea) despite loving the song to bits ( ‘confess’ & ‘atheist’ in the same sentence, I lol-ed).


Laura Marling

Originally posted by wisdom-of-spring

first impressions : ‘Blackberry Stone’. It was when I was moving to England. A friend had just - taken his own life. I felt confused; wasn’t even brave enough to go to his funeral (considering our complicated relationship/friendship). It was a time where I felt kind of - transitional, but only mildly so, almost like a - metaphorical transition. Stumbled upon the song whilst scrolling my Tumblr feed. Felt it to be sort of - healing. It felt fitting. 

eventual, & inevitable addiction : Listened to ‘Blackberry Stone’ on YouTube while I was feeling not the best, in my dorm room. Woke up the next day and bought most of her albums from a nearby HMV store (& a Ben Howard album which I ended up leaving in my mom’s car; I think it’s still there). I like listening to her music. The lyrics are just effing wonderful; glittering with emotions, beautiful af, poetic as one can only dream of.