dutchslavetrade

This is Ella. She is the familiar to one of my friends and patrons, Marc . Over the years I spent a fair amount of time with her. Our interactions usually consisted of her coming up to me at some point, sniffing my foot and running off. Though I am not one for close animal engagement, my encounters with Ella were always pleasant as it seemed we had a mutual respect for each other. So I was not unmoved when I learned, from Marc, of Ella’s passing a few days ago. In his email he described a particularly connected moment that reaffirms my feeling of there being a mutual respect between Ella and me.

“After I was living at my mom’s for a bit, I decided to lay out all of the art I had to see what I wanted to hang on the walls of my studio. When I rolled your piece out, Ella rubbed her face all over it and then proceeded to lay down on for about an hour. She was a fan.”

Goodbye… Ella, the black cat (1995-2011)

een dutchslavetrade : verstehen

This 120 minute painting mix is perfect for the bleak midwinter…cold, a little sad, a little angry and very danceable. Perfect to listen to while defrosting yr windshield, applying lotion to yr dried out skin, or while walking the streets looking for discarded cardboard to use as shipping material.

Verstehen features songs by Crass, Amy Winehouse, Shit Robot, RZA, Knife in the Water, Harmonia, John Lennon, Debbie Deb, Janet Jackson, Glass Candy, Frank Ocean and more.

click photo to download

Elizabeth of Bohemia (19 August 1596 – 13 February 1662) was the eldest daughter of King James VI and I, King of Scotland, England, Ireland, and Anne of Denmark. As the wife of Frederick V, Elector Palatine, she was Electress Palatine and briefly Queen of Bohemia. Due to her husband’s short reign in Bohemia, Elizabeth is often referred to as the Winter Queen.

Commute (Poke Me Full of Holes), 2012     62cm x 91cm acrylic on cork board

An office motif on an office supply for the office. Commute (Poke Me Full of Holes) is part of an ongoing series of office themed pieces painted on cork bulletin boards including I Can’t Be Fired, Slaves Are Sold , (2010) and This Isn’t a Desk. It’s a Landfill, (TBA).

Untitled Page from a Sketchbook (Coffee)  2008 29cm x 21 cm graphite on paper

When I start a new sketchbook (as I am currently) I first review a few of it’s predecessors, to time travel, see if progress has been made/critique, and to scavenge any bits of idea-flesh that may remain overlooked on the carcass. In 2008 I was balls deep in office culture, bored and drank a lot of coffee to cope with the aforementioned circumstances.

Leda with Swan Approaching, 2009 60.5cm x 121cm acrylic on canvas

I have a particular interest in the time and events that precede “important” moments. Such as the processes that lead up to a chemical reaction, the five shots taken just before a Pulitzer Prize winning photograph, or what someone was doing right before an earthquake hit. So in allegorical paintings, especially ones which have been repeated throughout time, my approach is to address these spaces prior to the event. In musical terms, the rest before the note. In Leda with Swan Approaching Leda sits doodling a pentagram, symbolic for conjuring, while the swan wildly approaches. At Leda’s side is a dead rat and and a facis (bundle of sticks). These two elements are editorial symbolism saying “there’s something that stinks about this story and it has the odorous quality of fascism.”   For those still unfamiliar with the story of Leda and the Swan, I came across this recounting of the story written by someone who is as equally nonplussed by this bizarre tale as I am and they also included several images from art history so,  two birds one stone.