during my test

anonymous asked:

I can't fully express how off point you are with some of your memes. You're obscuring young people's understanding of history

I gladly invite you (or anyone) to link me to every post from our archive that you feel to be historically inaccurate, including your justification. I’ll be the first to admit that not all of our memes are perfect. This blog is a collection of content that is either created originally, submitted by you guys, or found online. I’m just one person, be it the creator or the cultivator, but still one person. Simply a full-time student who can’t operate with the same intensity and vigor as an entire fact-checking or editing department – although I wish I could. 

Humor is subjective in nature, so I’m not at all surprised to hear you say that “some” of the memes feel off; not every joke told is found funny. Further, you have to realize that our history memes are admittedly vague and short; we can only fit so much historical context into the joke. My job is not to paint a historical reference in every detail and provide readers with a full history education, for that is well beyond my scope.

With that being said, I find your charge of “obscuring” our youths’ understanding of history to be unfair. For a reader to even understand our memes, they must first understand the history, the facts of the past, which drive the very humor of our content. Sure, it’s fair to say that we do more than simply reinforce our followers’ past knowledge. I’m sure it’s possible that people may learn details or context that they didn’t know before. People may also see a history meme that they don’t have the full pretext to understand, and subsequently go about researching the topic further. Many even message me that our memes work as memory devices, which aid them greatly during tests. 

My point is, you seem to be demanding too much of a Tumblr blogger set out to make history jokes. People should definitely use a different source of information, besides a Tumblr blog ran by a student, to build their understanding of history. People shouldn’t take everything they read at face value, and should put all information – especially that of which resides on social media – under intense scrutiny. And maybe, just maybe, the history memes aren’t all that bad. 

4
Then can I choose a birthday for you?
Yours can be the same as mine,
April first!
Is that so?
So your birthday is the same as mine,
April first!
Happy Birthday! (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧
Sakura-hime, Syaoran, Tsubasa-hime and Tsubasa.

allergic-addiction  asked:

Do you know anything about grief? If so, my character Vivian spent 6 months with a group of friends and fell in love with another character. The character he fell in love with head over heels for dies the night after they kiss. How would this grief affect active fighting ?

My grandmother on my mother’s side died when I was eleven, my father died when I was thirteen (the day after my birthday), my dog died a day before my college graduation, and my grandfather on my father’s side died from Alzheimer’s a few years ago. That’s not counting the friends and non-blood related family members who’ve died over the years.

So, yeah, I’ve got a little experience with grief, and grief counseling, and therapy, and… well, other people who’ve also lost friends and family.

I will say upfront that experience with grief can’t be faked when translating it into a fiction. You’ve either lost someone or you haven’t. You will never truly understand until you’ve experienced it yourself. And, if you haven’t, honestly, I hope you don’t join this unhappy club for a very long time.

Grief happens in stages, we consider them as five to be exact. Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance. There is no one size fits all here, or rules, no guidelines for the amount of time it takes because we work through it in our own time. You can and often do go through all five just to accept the physical truth someone you love has died, then all over again with the emotional fallout in the months even years afterward. It’s possible to go forward and back between the stages, and it isn’t a steady process. I’ve come to terms with a lot of the deaths in my life, but some took around a decade to reach the acceptance stage.

In initial the months after my father died, I waited to hear his car coming up the driveway at the time he usually arrived home from work (around 5:30). Anytime the doorknob turned, I’d feel a small bit of hope that it’d be him walking in. I still hope, sometimes, nearly twenty years later, that he’ll come through the door.

I tried to hold on to what he sounded like when I realized a month later I was forgetting. I managed a single word, the name of a friend’s father.

The problem with writing grief if you’ve never experienced it is this: you will over focus on the emotion and forget the detail.

Grief is not being able to remember where you live when you dial 911 for the ambulance. It’s the adrenaline leaving your hands shaking when you reach for the body, and the cold stiffness beneath your hands. The chalky white skin, and one eyelid half open. A frozen, milky, blue-white pupil pointed nowhere.  The faint, sour smell in the air. The way you shake it, and shake it, and shake it like that’ll bring the body back to life.

The way you still describe it as the body years later instead of referring to it as him and in second person instead of first.

Grief is never being able to watch Oliver and Company again.

This detail is part of why it’s so difficult to describe or write grief if you’ve never experienced the loss of a loved one first hand. You’ve also got to describe that loss through the eyes of your character, re-imagine it so the experience is not only tailored to their experiences but laser specific to those exact moments when they learned or came to the realization someone they loved died. One of the first things to understand about death in fiction is that it won’t do the work for you.

My father died a week before my first degree black belt test, and I’d just turned thirteen. I honestly can’t remember much about that week. It was Spring Break, so I didn’t have to go to school. My days were mostly filled with martial arts and emptiness. There were moments I’d remember, then grow sad or try to avoid it by focusing on what was coming ahead of me. People told me how brave I was, clapped when I came back to training a day later, but the truth is that doing that was easier than remembering what happened. I was in the shock stage all the way through the test. Numb to the world, I didn’t feel anything. Not pride, not happiness, not “oh good we’re done now”, nothing at all. It wasn’t bravery, so much as it just was. The world moved around me and the rest of it was gray.

In that moment, I became “the Girl Whose Father Died The Week Before Her Test” in the organization and everyone knew who I was for years afterwards.

However, the moment I really broke down was when I returned to class afterwards and began to cry when one of my classmates pushed a crossword onto my desk that read “Father”. I cried so hard, then I went out into the hallway and cried through the rest of the class that day.

That’s one experience, though. Like I said, there’s no one size fits all and every experience is unique. If you’ve got a character whose lost a lot of people over the years, then it does get easier.

However, if you’re writing a character who experiences death on the regular then their experience is going to be different. You could get someone who numbs themselves out to the world, defers the loss until later, and deals with it then. A person for whom “doing things” is them showing their grief. They could crumple up into a ball, give up and just cry. They could get angry to the point they want to kill the person who took their loved one and want to kill them. They could be compromised to the point of they are incapable performing their job, and need to be scrubbed from a mission for their safety and their teammates.

They could get triggered by the violence to the point where they lock up and can’t mentally face it anymore, where it becomes too much for them to handle. Sometimes, they break all the furniture in their apartment. Sometimes, they don’t clean out the other side of the closet for six years. They may get angry and lash out at those close to them who aren’t experiencing this death as keenly as they are. Or the might do it just because, without reason. They might close themselves off from everyone they know and love. Wall up out of fear of losing another person, find it difficult to build new connections. Become a different person.

Or, rarely, they could be completely fine. Or, seem like they’re fine on the surface. Others who are suffering will get pissed at them if they’re fine. When it seems like you’re fine, others will call you a monster. How dare they.

Grief is not guaranteed to get you killed in combat, but it can. It leads to stupid mistakes because you’re mentally compromised, even when you don’t realize it. We run from it sometimes. It’s so big, and heavy, and dark, crashing down all at once with no easy answers. No platitude satisfies. Numb, angry, stricken, despairing, you can move through these states so rapidly that it’s almost impossible to follow. Grief just is.

In a situation where you need to be able to focus or your life and those around you are at risk, then grief becomes detrimental. If you’re mentally compromised and refuse to recognize it then it will only put others at risk. Many people will insist they are “fine”. That it doesn’t affect them, that they can still work. It does though. It will. As a result, events can be disastrous in the fallout.

Even if they can fight, revenge isn’t satisfying. It’s empty. Grief-fueled rampages will only lead to more sadness and more emptiness and a re-experiencing of the loss all over again. Usually, it causes more tragedy.

How will your character react? I don’t know.

How does grief affect fighting, even years afterward? It can be really bad, my friend. Really goddamn bad.

You’ve got to find an equilibrium in your mind and acceptance, real acceptance too. You can’t just tell yourself you’ve accepted it, and that difference can be difficult to grasp.

Understand loss is not the cause of grief, and not death itself. We will grieve lost relationships and broken down friendships, when what we love disappears from our grasp. Don’t assume it’s in the death, look at the loss and how they feel about them being gone.

As a writer, your answer is they need to find a way to come to terms with this loss and that is a journey without an easily defined destination. I mean “come to terms” and not “get over”. Loss is with you forever, but whether we accept it or it continues to haunt us will be up to the person in question.

From me to you, here are some ways I dealt with my father’s death in my teenage years:

1) I went to counseling.

2) I read all the books of his on the shelf that I could scrounge from my parent’s bedroom, even when I didn’t like them. I still have a few of his fantasy hardbacks squirreled away.

3) I tried to play Star Wars: Tie Fighter.

4) I cried when I tried to tackle the Walkers in Rogue Squadron 2, because I’d always run to him and beg him to help me pass the level.

5) I’d go smell the shirts my mom left when she refused to clean out his side of the closet until they didn’t smell like him anymore. Then, I felt sad all over again.

6) I dedicated my open form during my second degree test to him, and picked a really sappy country song.

7) I read and re-read L.E. Modesitt Jr’s entire “Saga of Recluse” over and over again because Colors of Chaos was the first fantasy book my dad handed me to read.

8) I named my Sovereign Class ship in Star Trek Online after him.

I once sat with another student at college and we commiserated over our shared bond as members of the “Dead Parents Club”, telling stories about how our parents died and laughing about where we were now. To another student, who’d never experienced what we had, this seemed incredibly insensitive, they were confused, and they said so.

We said, “Dead Parents Club”. Then another student who’d recently lost their aunt asked if they could join us, and we expanded to members of the “Dead Relatives Club”.

It’s not all sadness and pain, misery and angst. In fact, if you go this route then it’s not really real. Much as it might seem like it on the surface, grief isn’t the same as literary angst. You need to show, not tell and that begins with actions. Start figuring out how this loss affects your character before you take a stab at how it’s affecting their ability to fight. Grief is about individuals, and there are no easy answers. Only actions, decisions, and struggle for good or ill.

-Michi

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anonymous asked:

Did you and all your siblings ever attend the same school? (Basically what education-related sibling and step-sibling hijinks occurred?)

From fifth grade on we all attended the same school! Interestingly enough, we all had our different social groups so we didn’t hang out much. Plus the teachers tried to keep us as separated as possible so we wouldn’t be co-dependent later! By the time we could have taken classes together, all of our interests were different enough that we really didn’t!

There is one time I remember fondly though! The problem with having five kids all in the same house is that that means there are five Disease Containers in close quarters at all times. I usually didn’t get sick, but I’d pretend to be sick all the time because school wasn’t as fun as watching TV or reading all day. 

And sometimes my Pretend Sickness was validated by one of my Responsible Siblings’ actual sickness. With little to no coordination on my part even!

I was in fifth grade, I think?  And the thought of lasting all the way to math at the end of the day was terrible and maybe I was actually sick from boredom. Plus, my brother T was already at home with the flu so he wasn’t suffering next to me in the one class we shared.

Hm, I thought during my spelling test, you know, what? I think I have a stomach ache.

So I got myself excused and went to the nurse. To get to the nurse’s office though, I had one more hurdle: the office ladies.

“Excuse me,” I told the receptionist. “I’m sick.” I put my hand on my stomach and looked very concerned. “My stomach hurts.”

“Have you tried going to the bathroom?” the receptionist asked. She’d seen me before. She knew my tricks.

“Yes,” I lied.

“Hey, Anne!” she called back to the nurse’s office. “You got another one!”

Another one? I thought, walking back. 

My sister AC was sitting in the patient chair looking absolutely ill. The nurse was sitting behind her desk, writing something down.

“Oh,” I said. “Hi, AC.”

“Hi,” she said miserably. “You too?”

“Oh, yeah,” I said and tried to mimic her expression. “It got me bad.”

“Wait,” the nurse said, pointing her pen at me.  “You’re H’s sister, right?”

“And hers,” I said modestly, inclining my head to AC.

I will never forget the look on the nurse’s face. Like she was looking at patient four of the plague. “Oh, you’re those kids. Your other sister went home this morning. I’ll call your parents.” Again, she didn’t say. I heard anyway.

“My dad is coming to pick me up,” AC told me. She picked up the waste basket and cradled it in her arms, turning slightly green. 

“Oh,” I said and turned to the nurse. “We live together so he can just–”

“I still have to call,” the nurse interrupted, pulling the phone away from her mouth. She tapped her pen on her desk.  Again, she didn’t say.

I went and took a seat next to AC, grateful that she hadn’t thrown up yet. I was a sympathetic vomiter.

I could hear the phone ringing faintly before my step-dad’s voice interrupted it. “Hello?”

“They’re dropping like flies,” the nurse said in the most aggrieved voice I’ve ever heard. 

Needless to say, I got to go home and read some Tamora Pierce.

2

cry out [RIJF'16]

whisker up and prepare for another eightxciting year of weird tweets and weirder vid! 

can you believe its already a year after pinof 7 im not ready

Studying Bottle Spell

It’s that time of the year again, when exams are around the corner ugh. Anyone else last minute cramming for a test like me? Witches, I gotchu.

This spell can be done just as last minute, and it helped me so much to stay focused and motivated while studying. I also added some relaxing crystals and herbs to help me stay calm, since exams up my anxiety like there’s no tomorrow.

You probably have most of these herbs/crystals around your house already, but if not feel free to substitute or omit. I put some crystals together in a bag, and you can use any container for these. Then I ground up most of the herbs (minus the orange peel and bay leaf) and put those in a small glass jar, again you can use anything you’ve got around. I put those together in a plastic baggy with a clear quartz to amplify the effect. I kept this around me while studying and I’ll take it with me in my pocket during the test.

You can also use this for anyy type of studying, including studying witchcraft! So here it is :)

Crystals.
- sodalite or lapis lazuli (or both)
- tiger’s eye
- jade
- sunstone
- blue lace agate
- carnelian
- onyx
- fluorite
- aventurine
- moonstone
- calcite

Herbs.
Add an orange peel and bay leaf. Write your intention on the bay leaf (“academic success today and tomorrow” or “good grades this semester”, or simply “concentration, motivation, focus, and memory”) or you could also draw a sigil. Tear that up to activate and place in the bottle. I’m using a small bottle so that was another reason for tearing it up, or you could leave it whole, or burn, or whatever you want. Then add a pinch of:
- Earl Grey tea
- St John’s wort
- pink himalayan salt, black salt, or regular salt
- lavender or lavender tea
- rosemary
- chamomile
- sage
- sugar
Grind that up together and add to the bottle. I only used a pinch of each because the bottle I used is small, but if you have a bigger container you could use more, and put those and the crystals together even. I kept them separate because I didn’t want the salt to damage any of my crystals. Like I mentioned before, I added the clear quartz as well, but I put it separately so it wouldn’t “combine” with everything and instead would amplify the effects of the other crystals and herbs as a whole.

Voilá and good luck studying!!

The AP United States History Exam is right around the corner. These next few weeks are the most stressful time of the year for most students. So, if you are going to procrastinate, you can procrastinate with style! Here is a list of movies, musicals, videos, ect. that came to mind while I was studying during the year. They are a lot of fun to watch, but they are educational, and most of them are free!

TV Shows:

Liberty’s Kids: a super cute, animated series that takes place during the American Revolution, and highlights some of its aftermath. There are 40 episodes, but each thirty minute episode is full of concrete details. Start watching the first episode here 

Drunk History: Really funny with some topics not often discussed in the textbooks, but very relevant. 

Musicals

Hamilton: obviously this is a no-brainer. The music is full of concrete details and has helped me so much during my multiple choice practice tests dealing with early US development. You can listen to the full soundtrack here. Below is a shortened list of songs that have the most relevant concrete details.

Dogfight: Probably my favorite musical. It’s one night in America during the Vietnam war, and there aren’t a ton of concrete details, but the parts here (starting at 1:19) and here (10:25) accurately reflect the time period. You can start watching the whole musical here. (warning: there is a lot of cursing)

Pocahontas: Okay, let me preface this by saying that there are a lot of inaccuracies in this movie. A lot. But if you disregard the portrayal of Pocahontas and John Smith, there are some CDs. Listen to the Virginia Company for some of the highlights. 

EDIT (7/9/16) : Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson: Though there is some explicit language I picked out the songs that have some great concrete details on Jackson’s presidency and philosophies.

  • Populism Yea Yea: a helpful definition of populism
  • The Corrupt Bargain: this event always confused, and this song definitly clears it up (featuring Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun and John Quincy Adams)
  • The Saddest Song: really sums up Jackson as a president in a different point of view

Videos:

Schoolhouse Rock: Reconnect with your childhood and refresh on some historical events!

The XYZ Affair: i

t may be weird, but you will definitely remember it

The Gadsden Purchase:

Never forget


So that’s my list. All of the links are italicized. If you have any movies/musicals/videos/songs/ect that you think would help feel free to message me and I will add it to list. Good luck to everyone on the test this Friday!

IB Tips

Hey guys! Those of you who follow me know I’m a senior in the IB program at school. Over break I was reflecting on all the things I’ve learned over my years in IB classes that help me succeed and I decided to share these tips with you guys to help out any fellow IB students.

CLASSES IN GENERAL

- Make a summarized study guide after each unit. This will come in handy for practice IB tests and the actual IB exam at the end of senior year. You will have a couple pages per unit to study instead of combing through all your notes from 2 years of curriculum. Trust me it’ll make studying easier

- For in class essays bring your own watch so you don’t have to keep looking at the clock

- Give yourself 10-15 minutes to outline your response to an in class essay before jumping in. This helps organize your thoughts and the essay is written in a way where the grader can understand your ideas much easier

- For classes like English and foreign languages participate in class. This is the best way to practice your speaking skills for the exam. The people who participate in class almost always do better than those who don’t.

- Always do practice problems from the IB textbooks (especially math) because there will be extremely similar questions on your test and the IB exam

- For history and science classes create a list of essential terms and define them for yourself. These will help you recall info during a test. (In my school our history department would decide our essential terms and we would find the date definitions context and significance of these terms. This really helps for essays)

- Read and reread the material for your English class. Once for the general plot and another time for actual analysis. It’s too hard to do both at once

- For paper 2’s in English memorize a few scenes from each novel that you deem important and then integrate those into your essay. There is no way you’re going to remember every scene in two entire novels. (While you’re at it, memorize a few key quotes form each novel it will show you have a deeper understanding of the texts and boost your score)

EE (EXTENDED ESSAY)

- Make sure you choose an Extended Essay topic that you enjoy. You’re never going to want to write 3,000 plus words on a subject that you have no interest in. There are some subjects that seem easier to write on but it will be just as hard to write on those subjects if you don’t pick a topic you’re passionate about

- Don’t pick an Extended Essay Topic that you haven’t taken as an IB class. Chances are you won’t know how to write a formal paper in this subject and this can lose you major points.

- DO NOT write the entire thing in one day. It’s not possible and you will end up with a terrible grade.

- Talk to your supervisor multiple times. Email them over the summer while you work on it or even skype them. It’s their job you’re not bothering them. They are there to help you.

- Don’t pick a supervisor who has never taught an IB class before. They will not know how to help you write at an IB level and in the way that IB wants you to structure an EE.

TOK (THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE)

- If you take TOK after school always bring extra food or set up a system with your class to bring food because I guarantee you will be hungry if you stay after for the extra hour and a half

- Participate!!! You can’t get graded if you don’t talk in a seminar based class like TOK. It doesn’t matter what you say, just talk. I promise you that it will make a difference and you will start to improve if you keep doing it .

- Don’t worry, everyone is just as lost as you are. TOK is extremely confusing, complicated, and mind boggling. It’s philosophy, it’s supposed to be like that. Enjoy it because there’s not
other class that will make you question your entire existence.

IA’s (INTERNAL ASSESSMENTS)

- Make sure you buy/borrow the sources early because they might not come in time if you don’t

- When doing research, read the abstract first (fully don’t skim). T his will give you a good idea as to what the source is arguing and you can decide if it’ll be beneficial to you before trying to skim through 200 plus pages of work

- Don’t try and write it all in one day you need to do an adequate amount of research to get a good grade and it will be obvious to your teacher if you haven’t done enough research

- Your teachers often times have a lot of sources you can use for your paper. Ask them what they have on your topic before you go out to buy your own sources

So that’s all the tips I’ve accumulated so far! I hope this helps any current and future IB students. Good luck!!

2

I should have knocked…

(when it’s safe though!)

i don’t think i see that many mercy players healing their teammates when they use their ults! given, it might be dangerous, but sneaking in heals from the sidelines would be safer!

or, alternatively:

i mean, when it’s safe, why not

your fellow healer gets bloodthirsty too you know

ok so in my math class we were having a calculus unit and we had a test but none of us really knew what the fuck was going on in that section. now, my teacher was old and treated us like adults and didn’t care what went on in that class. he also handwrote the assignments (we didn’t need to turn them in) and tests and didn’t supervise us well during tests. so my teacher had the test and his key and he was showing us that he had it and decided to go down the hall to talk to a teacher. he was gone for like a minute and a smart guy got up and started taking pictures of it (bc it was the key and had the work) and then MORE people started getting up and getting pics. my butt stayed in my seat cuz i could see what was going. our teacher’s back was to the door, but the other teacher could probably see me and a couple students who were dangerously close to the door. and then someone put the pictures on a cloudshare (i think that’s what it’s called when you can share it to any iphone within the vicinity?). so the teacher comes back in and then he looks down at the test and RIPS that fucker up and says he’ll write the test that night. so we’re all wondering wtf happened, did the other teacher see us and inform him….? then the original person who took the pictures, i saw him a couple days later and he and i were talking, and he said that the test wasn’t where the teacher left it. ppl had moved the test. SO much got past this teacher, but this one little thing that could have easily been covered up fucking ruined this for us.

instagram

During my makeup test last night, my little black lion wanted to play.

How am I supposed to assemble Voltron like this?

#voltron #shiro #cosplay

Made with Instagram