dry-fork

One by one, the pinyon and juniper trees growing on federally managed lands in Dry Fork Canyon are coming down. Not all of them. Just large swaths here and there to create fire breaks.

KSL: “DRY FORK CANYON, Uintah County, Utah — One by one, the pinyon and juniper trees growing on federally managed lands here are coming down. Not all of them. Just large swaths here and there. We’re trying to put that vegetation on the ground so that when there’s a fire, we can actually work with it,” said Mike Bertagnolli, a fire and fuels technician with the Bureau of Land Management’s field office in Vernal. Typically, wildfires produce flame lengths roughly three times the size of the vegetation that is burning, Bertagnolli said. By removing the taller pinyon and junipers — which also crowd out grasses and forbs that serve as primary food sources for deer and elk — “the flame lengths will be much shorter than if the tree had been standing,” he said. The work is part of a multiyear project the BLM has undertaken in Uintah County with help from private contractors and state agencies, including the Department of Natural Resources.“

Rich King
Attorney & Counselor at Law
Criminal Defense Lawyer
Windsor Building East
335 West 50 North Suite E19
Vernal, Utah 84068
Tel: (435) 789-5433
www.uintahbasinlaw.com