drugs

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~  Getting High in Ancient Egypt: Blue Lotus

This particular flower was closely linked with the rising & setting sun for the ancient Egyptians, and was the flower belonging to the god of the sun and perfume, Nefertem. Apparently, Nefertem brought a blue lotus to the sun god Ra in order to help “ease the suffering of his aging body.”

Similar to a weaker version of MDMA or ecstasy, blue lotus causes a state of relaxed inhibitions in which users are more talkative, comfortable, and aroused. It’s not a psychedelic, but personal stories of the drug (as used today) often note that it induces lassitude and blissful sleep.

In The Odyssey, Homer described it as robbing Odysseus of any willpower: “Once tasted, no desire felt he to come with tidings back or seek his country more.”

The perfume of the flower was thought to have a healing quality, so the Egyptians liked to sniff it at parties, when they felt they needed healing, or as part of rituals… however, the exact details on this are still under debate. There’s a theory that the flower was infused with wine to change its chemical content, and after a period of fermentation, the wine would be drunk. However, the lack of a control group meant the results were unreliable, so it remains unknown if this theory holds any weight.

I like punk rock. I like girls with weird eyes. I like drugs. I like passion. I like things that are built well. I like innocence. I like and am grateful for the blue collar worker whose existence allows artists to not have to work at menial jobs. I like killing gluttony. I like playing my cards wrong. I like various styles of music. I like making fun of musicians whom I feel plagiarize or offend music as art by exploiting their embarrassingly pathetic versions of their work. I like to write poetry. I like to ignore others’ poetry. I like vinyl. I like nature and animals. I like to be by myself. I like to feel guilty for being a white, American Male.
—  Kurt Cobain