drug pipeline

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“History is not just stuff that happens by accident. We are the products of history that our ancestors choose, if we’re white. If we are black, we are the products of the history that our ancestors mostly likely did not choose. Yet here we are all together, the products of that set of choices. And we have to understand that in order to escape from it. -Kevin Gannon; Professor of History at Grandview University [From the film "13th” on Netflix]

  • *People are disrespecting the requests of the Standing Rock water protectors by refusing to help with chores around the camp, refusing to clean up after themselves, coming to the camp dressed up in stereotypical Native attire, taking photographs in areas that are off limits, and disrespecting the ceremonies, culture, and land, bringing drugs. So much so that the Standing Rock water protectors have released statements on the matter and listed guidelines on their websites on how to be respectful ON THEIR FUCKING LAND and quit treating it like Coachella Music Festival.*
  • Some asshole: Okay but at least they are there! Who cares what they're doing on the land as long as they are there showing solidarity! Let them get high and dress up, it's not that big of a deal.
  • Me: Shut up.
Selling cigarettes sold the patch

The fact that Hillary supporters of all people are the primary demographic complaining about the drug war, mass incarceration, and the school to prison pipeline, police militarization, the war on terror, and weapons trade, it’s just fucking mind boggling. Welcome to upside down world, where if you only supported more Hitler you’d have gotten less holocaust, where if you only found a way to get more chairman Mao you’d have less totalitarianism, where if you only had more Nixon you could have had less Vietnam war, where beating your kids solves child abuse, where your prolonged sickness during naturopathic healing just proves you just need more naturopathy, where if you only stuffed your face more you’d loose weight, where smoking cures cancer, marrying multiple offense felons is security, war is peace, freedom is slavery, ignorance is strength.

A rally against wolves held inside a wolf’s mouth is a rally made by the wolf.

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Betty’s speech—given her “seekrit” is about the mystery and we’ve been told she’ll be fighting hard to keep Juggie—I’m going with she’s investigating the drug trafficking pipeline as a means of uncovering dirt and/or information to trade for FP’s freedom, so she can have Juggie back with her always….

Thing is, sounds like maybe NO one knows initially—or maybe it’s her and Juggie only, and she’s already “ride or die”. My guess is Jug figures it/they catch each other/etc out soon enough and they’re working together, again, if she IS keeping a seekrit…

She can’t tell Vermin, cause I’m SURE Vermin’s parents are a target of her probe..

Alsoooooo….it would be way more interesting if Freddydoodle turns out to be the shady one,  all involved with drug trafficking…he did allude to something sinister previously…..

AstraZeneca tumbles on rumours of exit by Soriot

Shares in AstraZeneca dropped almost 5% today on reports from Israel that boss Pascal Soriot was about to join the country’s pharma company Teva, as its next chief executive.

Soriot is believed to be close to signing terms that would see him paid almost $20 million (£16 million) for the role, twice as much as his predecessor.

A spokeswoman for the Anglo-Swedish company said it would not comment on market rumours.

Soriot, 58, has led AstraZeneca since 2012 and is best-known for having fought off a £54 billion takeover attempt by US drugs giant Pfizer three years ago.

However, takeover rumours have re-emerged in recent months with Novartis said to be interested.

This year is also make or break for the company’s drugs pipeline, with several key cancer treatments expected to show breakthrough results, particularly in the new field of immunotherapy.

Astra, whose shares fell 242p to 4950p, needs new blockbuster drugs to replace the cashflows from its cholesterol treatment, being replaced by generic versions.

Shares in Teva jumped 4% on the reports. Its chief Erez Vigodman stepped down in February.

Meet The Scientist Who Never Sleeps

by Michael Keller

An infectious disease researcher named Eve has made a surprising discovery—a compound named TNP-470 that stops tumors from growing also shows promise in fighting malaria.

It’s an important early-stage drug development find. Around 200 million people suffer from malaria around the world and half a million die from it every year. But this isn’t a story about TNP-470; it’s about Eve.

The scientist worked day and night in a University of Manchester lab in the UK to uncover this promising lead. To link the compound with a new disease target takes a lot of mind-numbing, repetitive tasks from the earliest stages of work. Either in a lab experiment or on a computer, compounds are run through initial tests to see if they might do something useful against a disease. All those that might show promise, which could be in the thousands or millions of experimental compounds, are then tested again in a mass screening. Some will appear to do something useful against the disease; others that must be weeded out will offer false positives. This subset is then retested to confirm the results.

Hurdles continue to be thrown at candidate compounds and the reject list expands until just one really promising molecule remains. This long process is part of the reason why it can take more than 10 years and $1 billion to develop a new drug.

But Eve didn’t care about all the work that goes into the basic research behind drug discovery. And she sped up the discovery curve as she worked, learning from early tests to do better in later ones. When the sun went down and other researchers went home for the evening, the scientist kept working. She didn’t take a break to get caffeinated, or even to turn the lights on. That’s because Eve is a robot, with arms to manipulate samples and advanced instruments to analyze them, that learns as it processes compounds through complex artificial intelligence.

Keep reading

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On May 20, about 100 stock analysts gathered in the ballroom of the Hyatt Regency Hotel in New Brunswick, New Jersey, to hear good news from top executives at Johnson & Johnson: The company had 10 new drugs in the pipeline that might achieve more than a billion dollars in annual sales.

For 129 years, New Brunswick has served as the headquarters of J&J, America’s seventh most valuable public company. With consumer products from Band-Aids to baby powder, Neutrogena to Rogaine, Listerine to Visine, Aveeno to Tylenol and Sudafed to Splenda, Johnson & Johnson is the biggest and, according to multiple surveys, most admired corporation in the world’s most prosperous industry—healthcare.

But the real money—about 80 percent of its revenue and 91 percent of its profit—comes not from those consumer favorites, but from Johnson & Johnson’s high-margin medical devices: artificial hips and knees, heart stents, surgical tools and monitoring devices; and from still higher-margin prescription drugs targeting Crohn’s disease (Remicade), cancer (Zytiga, Velcade), schizophrenia (Risperdal), diabetes (Invokana), psoriasis (Stelara), migraines (Topamax), heart disease (Xarelto) and attention deficit disorder (Concerta).

For more on the horrible side-effects from Johnson & Johnson’s drugs including a boy with 46DD breasts read on here.