drug offender

highlights so far of the bc invasion

-hangman saying he wanted to shove the bullet club flag up triple h’s ass

-nick yelling “gallows are you in there? karl anderson are you in there? finn balor! come on out! your friends are out here, we’re here to rescue you!” at the building with his mega phone

-hangman walking around with binoculars

-marty sitting on top of the car, riling up the crowd bc bless him

-cody refusing to say his catch phrase untill marty suggested they say it quietly which resulted in a group whisper of “fuck the revival”

-cody stood on the car and did the speech from independence day?

Anyway I love paladin Danse and I am also completely capable of realising that he is a shit and problematic, I get angry at him a lot pre-bb, and I completely understand why people may choose not to like him at all. His constant spouting of brotherhood bigotry is hard to swallow, his ‘shoot first ask questions later’ default stance comes across as extremely threatening. The list goes on and we all know the details.

However, I am also capable of realising how he changes and grows as a character, how (shitty writing and rushed quest aside) he becomes neutral on things he once hated, and how in-depth his character is if you actually spend a lot of time with him (not hating innocent ghouls, showing that his morals and beliefs do differ from what the brotherhood teaches him, loving it when you help settlements and people just trying to get by every day etc)

I love him because he’s not perfectly good, because the brotherhood is all the isolated synth with memories of being an orphan has known and therefore all he believes. I love him because he listens to the sole survivor and tries to change his mindset on things, even if it’s difficult and he still feels conflicted. I love him because he battles on, even though he has incredibly low self-esteem, even though he is obviously unwell through trauma, even when he finds out he is the thing he has been brought up to hate. I love him because if Bethesda had bothered to change aspects of his character post-bb (like they did after caits personal quest), then we would likely see a character trying desperately to leave the brotherhood behind and accept himself, become a better person, and help the Commonwealth as best he could.

Danse is flawed, extremely flawed, but he’s a well-written, complex character. We can go through our lives only believing there are black and white personalities for characters to have, that we must only like the 'good’ characters, but like real people they have the ability to grow and change. That is ultimately why I love Danse - he’s misguided and problematic, maybe even brainwashed, but his true morals and personality reveal themselves as his story progresses, and this is all thanks to your Soles actions.

“Problematic” characters who are forced to reassess all they believe and think and work hard to change it as a result are some of my favourites. Don’t dismiss fans for liking these characters, because some of us see ourselves in them more often than not, because some of us have worked hard to change what we believe and think to become what we are now.

All today's updates about top's health

T.O.P, who has been hospitalized due to an overdose of tranquilizers after being charged with smoking marijuana, will beleaving the intensive care unit tomorrow. A staff member of Ewha Mokdong Hospital, where T.O.P is hospitalized, told Sports Chosun on June 8, “He has gained consciousness. His vital signs are back to normal. We think that it will be okay for him to leave the intensive care unit tomorrow. He is to get psychiatric treatment afterwards.” The emergency team that has been taking care of T.O.P wanted him to get treated by neurologists and psychiatrists, but it was impossible since he was in an lethargic state. The staff member said, “He can now talk and eat. His vital signs are back to normal. He will be transferred to a unit/ward for psychological rehabilitation on June 9 and will continue getting treatment. The doctors will discuss with T.O.P’s guardian whether he will get psychiatric treatment in this hospital or move to a different one.” Earlier on, T.O.P’s mother arrived at the intensive unit with his manager and said, “He’s much better now. He looked me in the eye and recognized me.” On the same day, a statement of indictment was delivered to the 42 Squadron to which he was assigned. Police authorities said, “The court sent a statement of indictment to T.O.P on charges of smoking marijuana today. The statement will probably arrive tomorrow as it was sent through registered mail. T.O.P will be losing his status as a conscripted police officer and the authorities will further deliberate his status. His services will end immediately and be sent home.” According to the rules, conscripted police officers who have been prosecuted without detention are removed from their status once they receive a letter of indictment from the court. T.O.P will be tried in court, and the court will decide on the possibility of the continuation of his army service. First time drug offenders are usually sentenced with probation. In rapper Iron’s case, he was sentenced to eight months in prison and two years of probation for smoking marijuana on three occasions in the first trial. The court will decide on whether T.O.P will continue his military service. If the court sentences him to more than 18 months in prison, T.O.P will dishonorably discharged from the military. He will no longer be obliged to do his military service. If he is sentenced to less than 18 months in prison, he has to finish the remaining period of his military service. According to the doctors, T.O.P is recovering quickly. Since he was in a lethargic state after overdosing on tranquilizers, the doctors think that the most important thing to do is evaluate his mental well being. Afterwards, he will be getting treatment from neurologists and psychiatrists. Meanwhile, the police started the investigation suspecting that T.O.P smoked marijuana in October last year at his house before he joined the police. The police tested his hair, and it came out positive. The police charged T.O.P with violating the drug laws of Korea and sent his case to the prosecutors. Afterwards, the prosecutors prosecuted him with without probation for violating drug laws. T.O.P passed the final test of the 348th test for recruiting conscripted police officers by the Seoul District Police in November last year. He joined the police in February 9 and was doing his service as as a member of the police band of the Seoul District Office. After being prosecuted, T.O.P was transferred to the fourth task group in Yangcheon-gu. T.O.P apologized and said, “I would like to apologize for all the disappointment caused by my wrongdoing. I’m too ashamed of myself to even stand in front of people and apologize face to face.” T.O.P’s first trial will take place on at the Seoul Central District Court on June 29. Source bigbang updates Man he’s only getting better and better with time let’s hope everything is gonna work out we have to support him he needs us through this

Originally posted by tabis-eyebrows

“I was personally involved in taking down the planet’s most notorious drug trafficker, Pablo Escobar, in 1993. While we managed to make Colombia a bit safer, it came at a tremendous price.” —César Gaviria, former president of Colombia

former president césar gaviria wrote a new york times op-ed decrying the violent anti-drug campaign in the philippines led by president rodrigo duterte

President Duterte Is Repeating My Mistakes | New York Times

Illegal drugs are a matter of national security, but the war against them cannot be won by armed forces and law enforcement agencies alone. Throwing more soldiers and police at the drug users is not just a waste of money but also can actually make the problem worse. Locking up nonviolent offenders and drug users almost always backfires, instead strengthening organized crime.

That is the message I would like to send to the world and, especially, to President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines. Trust me, I learned the hard way.

We Colombians know a thing or two about fighting drugs. Our country has long been one of the world’s primary suppliers of cocaine. With support from North American and Western European governments, we have poured billions of dollars into a relentless campaign to eradicate drugs and destroy cartels.

full article

Prison Song
System of a Down
Prison Song

System Of A Down - Prison Song

They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
Following the rights movement
You clamped on with your iron fists
Drugs became conveniently
Available for all the kids
Following the rights movement
You clamped on with your iron fists
Drugs became conveniently
Available for all the kids
I buy my crack, I smack my bitch
Right here in hollywood
(nearly 2 million americans are
incarcerated in the prison system
prison system of the US)
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
(for you and me to live in)
Another prison system
Another prison system
Another prison system
(for you and me to live in)
Minor drug offenders fill your prisons
you don’t even flinch
all our taxes paying for your wars
against the new non-rich
Minor drug offenders fill your prisons
you don’t even flinch
all our taxes paying for your wars
against the new non-rich
I buy my crack, I smack my bitch
right here in hollywood
The percentage of americans in the prison system
prison system, has doubled since 1985
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
(for you and me to live in)
Another prison system
Another prison system
Another prison system
For you and I, For you and I, For you and I.
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
For you and me
Oh baby, you and me.
All research and successful drug policy show
that treatment should be increased
And law enforcement decreased
While abolishing mandatory minimun sentences
All research and successful drug policy show
that treatment should be increased
And law enforcement decreased
While abolishing mandatory minimun sentences
Utilising drugs to pay for secret wars around the world
drugs are now your global policy now you police the globe
I buy my crack, I smack my bitch
right here in hollywood
Drug money is used to rig elections
and train brutal corporate sponsored dictators
around the world
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
(for you and me to live in)
Another prison system
Another prison system
Another prison system
(for you and me to live in)
For you and I, for you and I, for you and I
For you and I
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
They’re trying to build a prison
for you and me
oh baby, you and me

the signs as types of drugs

*dONT DO DRUGS KIDS PLS*


aries: cocaine - users feel confident and strong

taurus: khat - more talkative and more energy, appetite supressant

gemini: alcohol - can make someone more talkative, cause their speech to become slurred and make them physically uncoordinated

cancer: heroin - reduces physical and emotional pain and gives warm, drowsy feeling to allow users to forget their problems

leo: LSD - drug changes the way that users see and hear things. there is heightened self-awareness and users can hallucinate

virgo: mephedrone - euphoria, alertness and feelings of affection towards the people around you, paranoia

libra: cannabis - users feel relaxed, giggly and talkative

scorpio: GBL - feelings of euphoria, reduce inhibitions and causes sleepiness

sagittarius: amphetamines - the drug makes users feel energised and excited

capricorn: ecstasy - energy, followed by calmness

aquarius: magic mushrooms - hallucinations can occur for as long as nine hours

pisces: ketamine - low dose users might feel euphoric, and higher dose users might hallucinate

Someone said, “RHatO has been fun, but Jay has gotta get back to killing.” I screamed with glee.

YES. YES FOR GOD’S SAKE, CUT OFF SOMEONE’S HEAD AND STUFF IT IN A DUFFLEBAG YES! 

 Why does he need to get back to killing? Because that’s what antiheroes DO, it’s why we tune in FFS! His entire THING is that he genuinely believes the no-lethal rule hurts more than it helps, and just promotes a revolving-door system of criminals getting out to reabuse again and again and again. Remove the criminal permanently, you drop the crime rate by a small, permanent percent. I happen to personally and wholeheartedly agree with this sentiment. It’s not like Jason has ever (when written CORRECTLY, mind you) gone off shootin’ down just any ol’ one, he kills people that are constant repeat offenders, rapists, drug lords, traffickers, the worst of the worst that show no remorse or impetus to change. He takes them out! And it’s damn righteous seeing an asshat that REALLY had it coming get a bullet to the head with all the same remorse they showed to their victims. It’s satisfying, it’s brutal, it’s necessary, because while Batman and Friends uphold ideals, Jason and company hold the front line against the worst of crime.

 Yes, PLEASE, enough with this, ‘I promised Batman I wouldn’t kill’ crap. That just IS NOT JASON, he’s never compromised on that before. Not killing in Gotham – okay. Sure. I can see if they laid out a truce like that. No killing in DaddyBats sandbox – but everywhere else is free big game, you know? It’s time to put the crazies in the ground where they can’t hurt anyone ever again. 

I REALLY WANT to see that ruthless edge so defining of Jason’s entire philosophy to come back. Much as I enjoy RHatO right now, I think it could be 300% more fun to see that brutal edge come back in, especially juxtaposed with Bizarro’s more child-like view of the world. Maybe Jay doesn’t want Bizarro to kill at all, but himself and Artemis can do it no problem. Imagine the scene of him trying to explain why that is to Bizarro. Imagine the character depth to be explored there. This comic is just dripping with opportunity that is wasted because the titular character isn’t allowed to pull the goddamn trigger. 

Stop treating this whole team-bonding and no-killing shtick like it’s good for his character. It’s not going to change him, so instead of doing anything it’ll just stagnate. It almost feels like he’s had kid gloves put on him, that if he kills it’ll cause some massive mental breakdown. Uh, that is old hat, those issues have been handled and their influence is here to stay. Damage done. I don’t want to read a comic about how Jason is ‘fixed’ or ‘cured’ of his killing nature. NO! EFF THAT NOISE! That’s like saying ‘oh, don’t worry, we know places that can cure your being gay!’ Nothing could be more wildly insulting or blind. This is an essential, immutable part of who Red Hood is, we like him for it, we love him for it and for all the problems that it causes and how he always sticks to his guns – literally. Now bring back what’s so defining of this character and let him blow up a cartel.

Before anyone pipes up about how you can’t kill and NOT be psychotic – screw that noise, I don’t care, it’s comics. He isn’t psychotic in my book. He’s doing what’s needed to be done and no one else is gonna step up to do it so he might as well get his hands dirty. If that’s the way it’s gotta be, that’s the way it’s gotta be. You’re psychotic if you kill and get off on it, or feel nothing at all. It’s pretty clear Jason kills and feels pissed off about it. He doesn’t ENJOY it, it’s just work that has to be done. It’s dirty, it’s unpleasant, it’s disgusting – but the price of not doing it is far far worse than the alternative. It’s the mentality of a professional soldier, and we don’t go calling the armed forces psychos, do we?

”People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.” – W. Churchill

(PSA: If you do call the armed forces psychos, freaks, sadists or anything of the mentally-ill shaming nature: You should be ashamed that so many brave men and women gave their lives and continue to endanger themselves and the cohesion of their families to make sure you stay safe.)

I will probably write a whole thing about killing and psychoses and the incredibly well documented non-relation between the two, (surprise! most killing happens in self defense and people don’t feel guilty about it and aren’t insane!) but I don’t have time for it now. Tune in later.

Razzy out.

mattykinsel  asked:

1. Aren't some things police do.. good , like keeping hard drugs and sex offenders and murderers off the street? Why wouldn't we then look at the police as a nuanced institution that has problems but isn't inherently bad per se ? 2. Idk like .. it's hard for me to translate "police serve the interests of the rich" into everyday examples like I'm just a poor full time college student living in a city haha you know? I find a lot of left discourse is hard to make relevant.

“In contemporary industrialized democracies, the legitimate administration of violence is turned over to what is euphemistically referred to as “criminal law enforcement”— particularly, to police officers. I say “euphemistically” because generations of police sociologists have pointed out that only a very small proportion of what police actually do has anything to do with enforcing criminal law—or with criminal matters of any kind. Most of it has to do with regulations, or, to put it slightly more technically, with the scientific application of physical force, or the threat of physical force, to aid in the resolution of administrative problems.

In other words they spend most of their time enforcing all those endless rules and regulations about who can buy or smoke or sell or build or eat or drink what and where that don’t exist in places like small-town or rural Madagascar.

So: Police are bureaucrats with weapons.

If you think about it, this is a really ingenious trick. Because when most of us think about police, we do not think of them as enforcing regulations. We think of them as fighting crime, and when we think of “crime,” the kind of crime we have in our minds is violent crime. Even though, in fact, what police mostly do is exactly the opposite: they bring the threat of force to bear on situations that would otherwise have nothing to do with it. I find this all the time in public discussions. When trying to come up with a hypothetical example of a situation in which police are likely to be involved, people will almost invariably think of some act of interpersonal violence: a mugging or assault. But even a moment’s reflection should make it clear that, when most real acts of physical assault do occur, even in major cities like Marseille or Montevideo or Minneapolis—domestic violence, gang fights, drunken brawls—the police do not get involved. Police are only likely to be called in if someone dies, or is so seriously hurt they end up in the hospital. But this is because the moment an ambulance is involved, there is also paperwork; if someone is treated in the hospital, there has to be a cause of injury, the circumstances become relevant, police reports have to be filed. And if someone dies there are all sorts of forms, up to and including municipal statistics. So the only fights which police are sure to get involved in are those that generate some kind of paperwork. The vast majority of muggings or burglaries aren’t reported either, unless there are insurance forms to be filled out, or lost documents that need to be replaced, and which can only be replaced if one files a proper police report. So most violent crime does not end up involving the police.

On the other hand, try driving down the street of any one of those cities in a car without license plates. We all know what’s going to happen. Uniformed officers armed with sticks, guns, and/or tasers will appear on the scene almost immediately, and if you simply refuse to comply with their instructions, violent force will, most definitely, be applied.

Why are we so confused about what police really do? The obvious reason is that in the popular culture of the last fifty years or so, police have become almost obsessive objects of imaginative identification in popular culture. It has come to the point that it’s not at all unusual for a citizen in a contemporary industrialized democracy to spend several hours a day reading books, watching movies, or viewing TV shows that invite them to look at the world from a police point of view, and to vicariously participate in their exploits. And these imaginary police do, indeed, spend almost all of their time fighting violent crime, or dealing with its consequences.” - David Graeber

I feel like this explains it better than I could, tbh

Okay so everyone stans this girl, but why? She is a THREE time drug offender, drove someone to almost killing themselves and calls herself a “feminist icon” but all she did was point a middle finger at a camera screen? If this was Bom y'all would drag her to no end. You’re really sick if you think that this is “amazing, and what KPOP needs”, this girl should’ve been in jail a long ass time ago.

mattykinsel  asked:

1. Aren't some things police do.. good , like keeping hard drugs and sex offenders and murderers off the street? Why wouldn't we then look at the police as a nuanced institution that has problems but isn't inherently bad per se ? 2. Idk like .. it's hard for me to translate "police serve the interests of the rich" into everyday examples like I'm just a poor full time college student living in a city haha you know? I find a lot of left discourse is hard to make relevant.

I have a few more points to make before getting into your specific questions. 

This is a really good example of why solidarity is really important. Just because you personally might not experience a particular type of oppression (though you might experience others), doesn’t mean that it isn’t real. Its important to listen to and try to understand people who do. But even if you personally have trouble with that, there’s a lot of objective information and statistics to back up what they’re saying.

Institutionalized police forces are relatively new historically speaking, and were created during the industrial revolution to deal with striking workers in England and the American north, and as slave patrols in the american south. They were literally created to serve the interests of rich capitalists and slave owners.

To this day they perform the role of suppressing mass protest movements, and feeding a prison industrial complex that maintains racism and slavery. Private prisons profit immensely from this arrangement. Check out this ask I answered a while back. The entire system targets poor and black people to such an insanely disproportionate degree its impossible to argue its not simply a racist institution that carries out class war in the name of the rich.

1. First off prisons are an awful way to deal with drug issues. 22% of people are in federal and state prisons for non-violent drug related crimes. They haven’t hurt anyone, they’re there as a result of a bullshit war on drugs that disproportionately targets (you guessed it!) black and poor individuals. Drug related incarceration rates in the U.S. are nine times greater for young African-American men between the ages of 20 and 34 years (source), even though on average white people use more drugs than African-Americans. (Source) Aside from this. prisons make AWFUL rehabilitation facilities for drug users.  60 to 80 percent of drug abusers commit a new crime (typically a drug-driven crime) after release from prison. Approximately 95 percent return to drug abuse after release from prison. (source) So if you are actually concerned about rehabilitating users of hard drugs, prisons and law enforcement is not the way to do it. Providing resources and physiological help to addicts who want it, in a safe environment where they don’t feel trapped or forced into it, one that doesn’t ruin your life and any chance of getting a future job and/or home, would be a much better approach. 

As far as sex offenders and murderers are concerned, it would go along way to address the social causes of these crimes. Change our patriarchal and sex alienated society, and far less of these crimes will be committed. Provide people with material support, education, and institutions to help those who need it and far less crimes in general will be committed. There will always be some, but few enough to allow more localized, community organized approaches to crime that focus on conflict resolution and rehabilitation. 

2. I’ve provided some examples of police enforcing the interests of the rich above. If you want to get personal experience of this, go to some protests and watch the police tear gas and shoot rubber bullets into unarmed peaceful crowds. Get a sense of what it feels like to run for your life from people who you’ve been told are there to protect you. Talk to almost any Black, Native, or Hispanic person about their personal experiences with the police, I guarantee you they have something to say. Listen to people who experience things you don’t, try to empathize.  

Drugs

Marilyn: “When you’re on a film you’ve got to look good in the morning so you’ve got to get some sleep. That’s why I take pills.”

John Huston: “The girl was an addict of sleeping tablets and she was made so by the goddamn doctors.”

Arthur Miller: “Doctors had gone along with her demands for new and stronger sleeping pills even though they knew perfectly well how dangerous this was…there were always new doctors willing to help her into oblivion.”

According to Donald Spoto, Marilyn began to be addicted to sleeping pills in early 1954, after she took some to combat jetlag-induced sleeplessness. However, the evidence is that by the time she had already been using pills for as many as eight years - Marilyn told Amy Greene that she had been taking pills since the age of seventeen or eighteen. Certainly by 1950, on the threshold of her big break, Marilyn resorted to drugs to combat the overwhelming anxiety she suffered before screen tests. Since 1950 Marilyn had had a ready source of pills from her friend, confidant, and sometime mouthpiece, columnist Sidney Skolsky, who worked out of Schwab’s drugstore and could be relied on to provide sleeping pills and the like. Joe DiMaggio reputedly referred to Sidney and Marilyn as “pill-pals.”

The use of barbiturates, amphetamines, and narcotics was common in Hollywood. It was an exciting and dangerous thing to do, and there was far less awareness of the harmful long-term effects of substance abuse. Drugs ultimately claimed the careers and lived of many famous stars, from Errol Flynn to Judy Garland and Montgomery Clift.

Marilyn used barbiturates, hypnotics, and anti-anxiety drugs. Apart from one documented occasion in 1962, when she met Dr. Timothy Leary, she did not take pills for recreation or thrill-seeking, but as a way of combating her crippling inability to sleep, to calm her frayed nerves, or to tackle the debilitating fear and anxieties which assailed her. Susan Strasberg writes, “People mixed champagne and pills all the time, to increase the effectiveness of the pills. As for Marilyn, she had the burdens of her fear, her timidity, her insecurity and her unusually agonizing monthly periods that rendered her literally incapable of moving.” Once the addictive spiral began, she began to take yet more pills to counteract the effects of other drugs she had taken.

Marilyn was visibly affected by the after-effects of sleeping pills in 1954, when she regularly turned up late and groggy to work on There’s No Business Like Show Business - this was a time of high emotional tension as her recent marriage to Joe DiMaggio was running anything but smoothly.

After escaping the immediate danger of Hollywood and moving to New York in late 1954, Marilyn embarked on a year of self-discovery and acting experimentation, but she still needed sedatives and barbiturates to sleep. She continued to wash down the barbiturates with champagne, hoping that this would give her the chance of a good night’s rest. Eight years later, on the set of Something’s Got To Give, Marilyn was still fraught enough to swallow valium pills with champagne.

Despite warnings about the dangers of her drug abuse, Marilyn seemed unable to cut down her intake except for short periods - there was always some new crisis or her perennial insomnia to bring her back. Gynecologist Leon Krohn warned Marilyn that if she wanted to have children, she should do something about her intake of drink and drugs. After her second miscarriage, Marilyn was consumed with fear that she had brought this on by her intake of Amytal, a barbiturate (medical name amobarbital). By the late fifties, Marilyn was trapped in a dangerous spiral of having to take drugs to sleep, different drugs in the morning to battle through the grogginess, and then take more pills during the day to control her anxiety. Typically, Marilyn scheduled no appointments before midday; the hangover from Nembutal took all morning to clear. 

Marilyn’s dependence on barbiturates and sleeping pills increased even further during tumultuous shooting on The Misfits in 1960. Her Los Angeles doctors sent out stringer drugs, 300 milligram doses of Nembutal (sodium pentobarbital), three times the standard dosage for treating insomnia, and so strong that just seven of these pills would have been enough to kill a person without her tolerance. When she felt that these weren’t enough, she persuaded doctors to inject Amytal directly, in quantities not far off the administered for general anesthetics. In the mornings Marilyn was so groggy that makeup man Allan “Whitey” Snyder had to start making her up while she lay in bed. Rumors circulated that Marilyn had to be walked around her bedroom for hours to get her sufficiently clear-headed, and some biographers write that the only way to get her to actually wake up was to put her in the shower. 

In the last years of her life, Marilyn increasingly switched to chloral hydrate, more commonly known as “Mickey Finn” knockout drops. These were prescribed to her by psychoanalyst Ralph Greenson in an attempt to reduce her dependency on the barbiturates she habitually took. Greenson apparently also prescribed Dexamyl, a potent combination of Dexedrine (a now banned stimulant) and amobarbital, a barbiturate. He remarked in correspondence that her dependence was such that she resembled an addict, yet “did not seem to be the usual addict.” There were times, though, when her behavior was very much that of the addict, seeking new ways to administer the drugs she craved, including injection. Reputedly in the last month of her life, Marilyn’s regular doctor, Dr. Hyman Engelberg, attended Marilyn almost daily to give her so-called “youth shots,” which altered her mood and gave her redoubled energy. 

On August 3, 1962, just two days before her death, Marilyn had two prescriptions for Nembutal, her regular barbiturate sleeping pills, filled at her local pharmacy, from two different doctors (Dr. Engelberg and Dr. Seigel) at the San Vicente pharmacy on 12025 San Vicente Boulevard. 

On her last day alive, Marilyn probably took pills of phenobarbital and chloral hydrate. By mid-afternoon that day, she was seen on the beach walking with a little difficulty, and her speech was slurred. The autopsy showed levels 10 times the normal dose of the first drug and 20 times the normal dose of the second drug: blood levels of 4.5 mg Nembutal and 8 mg of chloral hydrate, and a much higher concentration of 13 mg of Nembutal in Marilyn’s liver. Disparities in these figures have been used to support allegations of foul play in Marilyn’s death and speculation that the lethal dose of drugs was administered either by injection or by enema. Controversy has even surrounded the exact list of drugs that Marilyn had in her bedroom at the time, with some commentators suggesting that only half of the pill bottles found on the bedside table were ever listed by the coroner on his toxicology report (Librium, Nembutal, chloral hydrate, Phenergan, and others without labels).

- The Marilyn Encyclopedia by Adam Victor.

anonymous asked:

Can I just say how much I love the fact that one of the authors is asexual? Because so am I, and I would love to read a fic with asexual!Tony so maybe you would like to write it? Perhaps Tony being afraid of rejection when he tells them, but not being able to hide it from them any longer, because the thought of having sex really does scare him and he can see that he want to take the relationship to the next level. he feels like it's now or never. He has to tell them.

A/N: fair warning, this is from the perspective of someone who identifies as somewhere between grey-asexual and sex-neutral, and a lot of this is based on my misadventures in dating and the panic attacks they’ve inspired. In this fic, I wrote Tony as what I imagine being sex-repulsed asexual feels like, although he’s also demiromantic. Side note, I headcannon Steve being demisexual, although it’s not really evident in this fic.


In the almost forty years that the news had been reporting on Tony Stark, the media liked to think that they knew everything about him. He was a genius, undoubtedly, and a savvy business man. He was also a trainwreck, causing scandal after scandal with booze and drugs or by offending someone.

Tony could give credence to all of that. Arguing that he wasn’t more intelligent than the majority of the population was laughable, and up until recently, he had been a complete mess in anything personal. It wasn’t like he could hide anything when he was in the public eye twenty-four, seven.

Except one thing.

Tony Stark was asexual.

Keep reading

blue pill: the war on drugs is an effective means of prevention and can be won.
“red pill”: the drug war is a failure, legalise and decriminalise all substances.
red pill: there is no war on drugs. Only 1% of drug law offenders are incarcerated, and the overall trend is towards legalization.

buzzfeed.com
Philippines President Compares Himself To Hitler, Says He'd "Be Happy To Slaughter" 3 Million Drug Users
President Rodrigo Duterte likened his anti-drug campaign that has left more than 3,000 people dead to Nazi Germany under Adolf Hitler, who killed millions of Jews.
By Michelle Broder Van Dyke

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte told reporters in Davao City on Friday that he would “be happy to slaughter” 3 million drug users, like Adolf Hitler had murdered about 6 million Jews.

The 71-year-old leader said he had been “portrayed to be some cousin of Hitler” by critics, Reuters reported. “There are 3 million drug addicts (in the Philippines). I’d be happy to slaughter them.”

“If Germany had Hitler, the Philippines would have…” he said, pointing to himself, according to Reuters.

“You know my victims. I would like (them) to be all criminals to finish the problem of my country and save the next generation from perdition.”

And once again, our national embarrassment makes it to the world’s headlines and it’s for making antisemitic comments. Comparing drug offenders with the Holocaust victims? That’s just very awful.

Mind you, if only it was possible, we’d ask for Duterte (along with De Lima) to be taken away from us (doesn’t matter if it’s a natural death, a disease or a “CIA assassination” that causes it) and for Miriam Santiago to be returned to us. This country doesn’t deserve a piece of trash like Duterte.

“I was a police officer in Baltimore for 21 years. I was addicted to heroin the entire time I was on the force. A lot of the guys had their addictions. I don’t think people understand the fear involved in the job. We were scared all the time. Baltimore was the murder capital of the world. It was tremendously stressful. I never used needles. Just powder. I was too scared of needles. My partner knew about it. One time he walked in the bathroom while I was using. He told me: ‘The moment I feel like you’re putting my life in danger, I’m turning you in.’ I did feel guilty when I was arresting drug offenders. But I always told myself: ‘You’re doing them a favor.’ One morning I looked in the mirror and saw death. I had no soul. So I made myself quit. I took two weeks leave, locked myself in a hotel room, and quit cold turkey. It was the darkest two weeks of my life. I can’t talk about it. But I never used again. My wife was never able to quit, though. She committed suicide six years ago. I woke up one morning and she’d been dead for seven hours, right next to me.”

2

Requesred by: Anon

Word Count: 650

Author’s Note: Selina’s one of my favoritesssss, thanks for this request.

You were already having a bad day. You had barely gotten any sleep, you had ruined your favorite shoes in a mud puddle, and now you had to walk to work because your car had broken down. You mumbled under your breath as you slid the strap of your bag back onto your shoulder. Honestly, you had no idea how it could get worse- until you felt a small hand reaching into the pocket of your coat.

You instantly grabbed the wrist, turning toward the girl with lidded eyes.

“Hey, let me go!” She tried her best to get away, but she didn’t want to make a scene in the middle of the city as she knew she would get caught by a cop.

“Why were you trying to take my wallet?”

“Let go, or I’ll scream-!”

“No you won’t,” The look in your eyes kept her from following through on her threat. “Why were you trying to take my wallet?” you repeated, blinking slowly, yawning as the other citizens of Gotham maneuvered around the both of you to go on with their day.

She didn’t answer for a moment, trying to look tough, but you could see the small glint of shame and fear in her eyes.

“I just wanted food. What- you never been hungry before??”

Ah- a street kid who just needed to eat. You felt like it was just yesterday that you were in the same situation. You pursed your lips, considering your options before speaking.

“I’m gonna let you go now, but don’t run- I’ll have no problem chasing you, got it?” The girl didn’t say anything, but you took the chance, releasing her from your grasp. She had the instinct to run away, but she decided to stay, staring up at you with suspicious eyes.

“What’s your name?” you questioned ad you pulled out your wallet, stepping up to a cart and ordering some food.

“What’s it to you?” You glanced down at the girl. You had to admit, she had spunk, and that was an important thing to have on the streets. You shrugged once.

“No skin off my back,” you retorted, paying for the bag of food and a separate hot dog, holding them both out to her.

“What’s all that for?” she asked, obviously wanting to take it, but not trusting you just yet.

“One for now, some for later- take it,” The girl slowly grabbed for the food, taking a large bite from the hot dog. You pulled out another ten and slipped it into her own jacket pocket. “Use that for water or milk or something- no drugs.”

“I don’t do drugs,” she sounded offended through her mouth full of food, and you grinned in a teasing manner.

“That’s what they all say,” She finally realized you’re joking and let the tiniest of smirks dance on her lips.

“Selina,” she exclaimed after she had finished her dog, holding the other bag tight against her chest. “Friends call me Cat.” You nodded in appreciation.

“Nice to meet you Cat- I’m Y/N,” You pulled your coat closer to you against the chilly air, fixing your hood over your head with a grin down at Selina. “I imagine I’ll be seeing you around- hopefully with your hands out of my pockets next time.” You gave her a playful wink, causing her to lower her head to hide her laugh before she nodded and ran into the alley, climbing a ladder gracefully fast. You see where the nickname came from now.

At least one good thing had come out of this day, and you walked away feeling like you had really helped someone.

Read the Letter the President Wrote to a Non-Violent Drug Offender

These commutations come as the president and his administration have highlighted the need to address outdated drug laws that are contributing to overcrowded prisons. The White House announced last year that it would begin commuting the sentences of non-violent drug offenders. Thousands of inmates have applied, and the government has turned towards non-profit organizations to help them sort through the cases. Two of the inmates granted clemency yesterday were aided by the Clemency Project 2014, reported Politico.

The majority of women defendants in the criminal justice system have extensive histories of childhood and adult abuse that may result in homelessness, substance abuse, and economic marginality that forces them to survive by illegal means. The systems that place victims under correctional control include the criminalization of women’s survival strategies.

Moreover, many incarcerated women were exposed to violence that began early in their lives… Women are also affected by their socioeconomic status, as low-income women of color have the greatest abuse risk. This leaves them vulnerable to being criminally entrapped and forced by abusive policies into the corrections systems. Violence perpetrated against women and girls can put them at risk for incarceration by forcing abused girls and women into the criminal justice system where they are not seen as victims, but as offenders in the eyes of the state.

The female population in the prison system is dominated by drug offenders. The actual offenses vary—from possession or minor involvement to more large-scale drug sales and distribution. The offenses also include prostitution performed for drug money or holding small amounts of drugs for their male partners. The “war on drugs” is sometimes called the “war on women” because it has brought proportionately more women than men into the prison settings.22 Racial discrimination in the criminal justice system has a devastating effect on women of color. According to Mary E. Gilfus, “[w]omen of color are more likely than white women to be arrested and charged with more serious offenses, to be prosecuted, to be convicted and to serve prison time.”

Ross notes that “[t]he violence experienced by women prior to incarceration continues inside the prison in a variety of forms including sexual intimidation, the overuse of mind-altering drugs, lengthy stays in lockup, and the denial of cultural activities for Native Americans.” We lose our dignity as soon as we enter the criminal justice center. It starts with a strip search—vaginal searches are particularly humiliating, but also painful. We are told to shower with a de-lousing soap, given state-issued clothes that are either too big or too small, and then we are given a prison number. The reality of the nightmare begins to set in the first time we hear the sound of the door closing and the turn of the key.

— 

22. Merry Morash and Pamela Schram, The Prison Experience: Special Issues of Women in Prison (Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press, 2002).

Stormy Ogden, Sharing Our Stories of Survival: Native Women Surviving Violence