drip-painting

I just wanna know if by any chance I’m gonna be forgiven for dripping paint all over the carpet and getting one of the curtains covered in red? It’s all washable though, I guess? But it’s because the light coming from the window was very nice and I had to put some color on something… I didn’t mean the carpet (or the curtains) of course, they were just in the way. But uhn… Yeah. 

Jackson Pollock was born on this day in 1912. See how he developed his signature style in a current exhibition featuring over 50 works from MoMA’s collection. 


[Jackson Pollock. Number 1A, 1948. 1948. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

This week: See Pollock from a new perspective, hear a demo of a 1957 Fender Stratocaster from our collection, and more.  


[Jackson Pollock. One: Number 31, 1950. 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange). © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Manuel Molina Martagon]

3

The birth of chaos  ( 2012 ), oil on canvas,  acrylic | artwork by Michel Zablodskiy 


Artist’s Statement: 

Work symbolize the chaotic powers of the nature.  Only chaos of smears and color. The name of such technique is drip painting.

Drip painting is a form of abstract art in which paint is dripped or poured onto the canvas. With this technique, artist is able to achieve a more immediate means of creating art, the paint  literally flowing from his chosen tool onto the canvas. The author of  this technique - Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954, featuring over 50 works, opens today. The exhibition presents a concise overview of the relentless experimentation and emphasis on process that was at the heart of Pollock’s creativity through rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, screenprints, and drawings, shown alongside iconic paintings like One: Number 31, 1950 (1950).  

[Installation view of Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (November 22, 2015–March 13, 2016). Photo by Thomas Griesel. © 2015 The Museum of Modern Art, New York]

See how Jackson Pollock developed his signature style over the course of two decades in a current exhibition featuring approximately 50 works from MoMA’s collection.  

[Jackson Pollock. The Flame. c. 1934–38. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]