drink h2o

HOW TO STAY AWAKE IN CLASS
  1. Shower before class. Have a 9 a.m. class? Hop out of bed in the morning and head straight for the shower. It’ll wake you right up! Plus, your classmates will probably thank you.
  2. Bring a water bottle, and drink plenty of H2O. Staying hydrated is a key factor in staying awake. Try putting ice in your water bottle; the     cold water will keep you lively and alert.
  3. Go to the bathroom. Walk off the sleepiness by taking a trip to the bathroom. The process of walking will get the blood circulating again. And don’t forget to take a stretch break while you’re in the hallway.
  4. Bring eye drops. It’s hard to stay wide-eyed and awake when your eyes are dry and irritated from the lack of sleep. When they’re feeling dry, splash a couple drops in them. You’ll feel more refreshed and your eyes will be grateful.
  5. Sit in the front row, or at least in the middle! The closer you are to the professor, the less likely you are to fall asleep due to volume. Not to mention the fear of getting caught dozing off will keep you wide awake!
  6. Take note. If you are daydreaming, eventually that will turn into real dreaming when you fall asleep. It might be hard when you are so tired, but taking notes during class can help keep you awake. It will keep you focused on the class material and less focused on how tired you are.
  7. Pressure points: Two of the best, and conveniently subtle, pressure points to keep you up are your earlobes and wrists.
        For your ear, while it may look like you’re just learning your cheek on your wrist, rub the area right above your lobe (or where a traditional ear piercing would be) between your thumb and index finger. Not only is it a fine motor movement to keep you active, but also invites blood to rush up towards your ear, and therefore, to your head.
        Or putting the inside of your wrists against something cold: the metal bar of your desk, the desktop, your laptop. The pressure point here will keep you awake!
  8. Small, repetitive movements: Foot tapping and chewing gum, just like rubbing the pressure point in your ear, “wakes up” those muscles, returning blood to those areas and reinvigorating your blood circulation.
  9. Hold your breath for a few moments. Every time you feel like you are falling asleep, hold your breath to a count of 100. You will become restless and more wakeful while you hold your breath. When you start breathing again, you’ll feel relieved and awake.
  10. Tap your feet and drum your fingers. Even these slight movements will help get your circulation moving and keep you  from falling asleep.
  11. Avoid consuming too much sugar. Sugar will give you a short     energy boost followed by a prolonged descent into sleepiness. Try a     healthy energy boosting snack instead, for example, carrots. Carrots are a  good energy booster, they’re healthy and won’t drain you of energy.
  12. Snap a hair tie. Okay, this is a weird method but I swear it works for me. Seeing as I always have a hair tie on my wrist, anytime I feel myself falling asleep, I just snap the hair tie against my wrist to keep me awake. It doesn’t really hurt, but it is enough to keep you alert. Next time you feel like snoozing, just try it to see if it works for you.
10 Facts About Water + Your Body

Water is virtually everywhere, from soil moisture and ice-caps to the cells inside our own bodies. On a normal, day-to-day basis, maintaining a well-hydrated system is easy to manage for those of us fortunate enough to have access to clean drinking water. So what role does water play in our bodies , and how much do we actually need to drink to stay healthy?

1. Depending on factors like location, fat index, age and sex, the average human is between 55 and 60% water. 

2. At birth, human babies are even wetter – being 75% water they are swimmingly similar to fish - but their water composition drops to 65% by their first birthday. 

3. The H2O in our bodies works to cushion and lubricate joints, regulate temperature and to nourish the brain and spinal cord. 

4. Water isn’t only in our blood: an adult’s brain and heart are almost three-quarters water - that’s roughly equivalent to the amount of moisture in a banana. 

5. Lungs are 83% water, which is roughly the amount of moisture in an apple.

6. Even seemingly dry human bones are 31% water. 

7. Each day we lose 2 to 3 liters through our sweat, urine and bowel movements, and even just from breathing. While these functions are essential to our survival, we need to compensate for the fluid loss.

8. Maintaining a balanced water level is essential to avoid dehydration or overhydration - both of which can have devastating effects on overall health. Increased dehydration can cause notable drops in energy, mood, skin moisture and blood pressure as well as signs of cognitive impairment.  In fact, a dehydrated brain works harder to accomplish the same amount as a normal brain - and it even temporarily shrinks because of its lack of water.

9. For a long time, conventional wisdom said that we should drink eight glasses a day. That estimate has since been fine-tuned; now the consensus is that the amount of water we need to imbibe depends largely on our weight and environment. The recommended daily intake varies from between 2.5 to 3.7 liters of water for men and about 2 to 2.7 liters for women - a range that is pushed up or down if we are healthy, active, old or overheating. But don’t go crazy - it’s possible to overhydrate if you consume too much water in a short amount of time - a risk mostly encountered by athletes because of complications in regulating water levels in extreme physical conditions.

10. Water within food makes up about a fifth of our daily H20 intake. Fruits and vegetables like strawberries, cucumbers and even broccoli are over 90% water and can supplement liquid intake while providing valuable nutrients and fiber.

Drinking well might also have various long-term benefits. Studies have shown that optimal hydration can lower the chance of stroke, help manage diabetes and potentially reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. No matter what, getting the right amount of liquid makes a world of difference in how you’ll feel, think and function day-to-day.

From the TED-Ed Lesson What would happen if you didn’t drink water? - Mia Nacamulli

Animation by Chris Bishop

One of my many talents includes being able to drink 1 gallon of water before 9 am 😎

Find yourself having a break? Make sure you have a bottle of water to hand babe; you need to stay hydrated!
I find it useful to mark on a bottle how much and when you should be drinking water..and lucky for us there are now cute bottles out there to help us! I picked my pretty pink bottle up from newlook yesterday for £7! Bargain.

Georgia x