dreamwalker

3

FAKE SCREENSHOT TIME! 

And some out-of-original-canon doodles illustrating one of our Alternative Universe thing with Lingrimm x)

Penguin-like baby Pticenoga aka Hedwig is so terribly cute Shade couldn’t resist. Someone loves dead bodies too! And, when she grow up, it became possible to show Vaughn the whole collection together! Seems he doesn’t like this much, but who cares?

It’s AU thing only. Of course, there’s no Pticenoga in the original game and she’s a completely separate character appeared much earlier than Borderlands 2 game. And, in her original story, it’s impossible for her to be a baby.

But there’s always a place for exception >:)

Shade and Vaughn aren’t mine, only Pticenoga is.

[Revised 2/17] Books for Witches, Diviners and Spellcasters

Hi, everyone. A while back (a long time ago, actually), I started an annotated bibliography on books about witchcraft and magick, and I’ve updated it once (last November). 

Since then, I’d been keeping a list of things I need to add to it, but didn’t get around to actually reworking and updating the list a second time until today. Largely because I can’t really go outside much today because of the smog. But anyways, here it is. I’ve also included divination-related books in this version, whereas previously they were separate.

I hope you find something on here that suits your fancy! Happy reading! Also, yes, I do want to do more book reviews on this blog, so if you’d like a longer review of one of the books listed below, let me know and I can write one.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after reading Energy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Riding and Hedge Witchcraft, by Harmonia Saille. I only mention these two in order to say that they’re best avoided. Saille tries to give a comprehensive look at the phenomenon, but it’s poorly-written and overly New Age. The negative reviews of them on Amazon really cover the problems with these book in more detail than I ever could.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I have major issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

Tarot

The Book of Thoth, by Aleister Crowley. Make sure you actually own (or have access to pictures of) the Thoth deck before you dive into this. By far one of the best books on Tarot ever published. The prose is often dense and purple, but in this one book, Crowley teaches so much about Tarot and it’s connection to the Western Mystery Tradition. I can’t really say much more - it must be experienced.

The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, by Arthur Edward Waite. I recommend this book because it is a classic and was introductory for many older readers. It will teach you to read and gives insight into the methodology behind the Waite-Smith deck specifically, particularly his use of what are essentially parables and why he does this. Do not expect too much esoteric information, but read it anyways.

Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom, by Rachel Pollack. This is the epitome of a good modern Tarot book and is really one of the first ones I’d recommend for someone looking for an accessible book on Tarot in a modern context. Very dense in information and history, yet altogether worth it. You’ll want highlighters nearby for this one!

Tarot for a New Generation, by Janina Renée. This is essentially a book for children and teenagers, but I do recommend it for them, specifically, because it is well-written, easy to understand, and helpful to absolute beginners.

Secrets of the Waite-Smith Tarot, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This book focuses just on the history, symbolism, and creative process of the Waite-Smith deck. It gives you an inside line on just what Pixie Smith was thinking when painting specific scenes, and is a great look at her life’s work, as well.

The Tarot: History, Symbolism, and Divination, by Robert M. Place. This book will not teach you to read Tarot, but does give an actual, accurate portrait of the history of the phenomena, which is incredibly important and useful. Know your history.

Understanding Aleister Crowley’s Thoth Tarot, by Lon Milo DuQuette. I hesitate to recommend DuQuette due to issues I have with his approach to Qabalah, but many people ask me for a beginner book for the Thoth Tarot specifically, and this is the closest I’ve come to finding one. I recommend reading this alongside, and not instead of, Crowley’s Book of Thoth.

The Back in Time Tarot, by Janet Boyer. This is more for the intermediate reader, and the entire book details a single, extremely useful technique for familiarizing yourself with the cards, namely by framing past events in terms of how they might appear in a spread.

Lenormand

The Essential Lenormand, by Rana George. This was not the first Lenormand book I picked up, but it was the most influential and intense. Ms. George writes in a personable, touching fashion and brings the concepts of the system home by relating them to life experiences in a way rarely seen. She is one of those authors I literally go all “fangirl” over.

Learning Lenormand, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This is one of the better beginner books on Lenormand. I’m not going to lie - it isn’t as good as Rana George’s, but it definitely is worth reading if you’re completely new to the system. It’s very accessible, where some of the books I’ll be listing later in this can seem intimidating, or so I’ve been told.

Lenormand: Thirty-Six Cards, by Andy Boroveshengra. This book is intense, but in a different way than Ms. George’s. Expect to be inundated with information and techniques. Another one of those where you really need to take notes or highlight while reading, and read it multiple times.

Secrets of the Lenormand Oracle, by Sylvie Steinbach. This book is organized in a novel and useful fashion by topic, and gives specific techniques for readings on love, money, spirituality, and other topics. Highly recommended, and I tend to use it as a reference book nowadays, looking things up as needed.

The Complete Lenormand Oracle Handbook, by Caitlyn Matthews. Not for the beginner, nor the faint at heart, this one details a lot of what, to me, seem to be more advanced approaches and techniques. I use this book a lot, and I think anyone else will enjoy it, too. Good information on the connection between Lenormand and traditional playing cards, too.

Cartomancy with Lenormand and the Tarot, by Patrick Dunn. This is more of a special topic book, and best read after you’ve got some familiarity with both Tarot and Lenormand. It’s all about using them in tandem and the synergy between them.

Astrology

The Luminaries, by Liz Greene. I could really recommend anything by this author, but she’s written so much, and this book is a particularly important one. It focuses entirely on the Sun and Moon in astrology, and gives a good look at why the luminaries need to have a special place in your understanding.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Practical Astrology, by Priscilla Costello. This is focused, as you might expect, on actual interpretation of charts and less on theory, but it gives a good background on that, too. Was quite helpful in my attempts to interpret @xepsurah‘s unusual natal chart.

The Complete Book of Astrology, by Kris Brandt Riske. Very beginner, and very light on intellect, heavy on intuition. A great introduction, but I would not suggest it as the only book you read if you’re really interested in the subject.

Tasseography

Tea Leaf Reading for Beginners, by Caroline Dow. There are only a few books within Llewellyn’s immensely popular “For Beginners” series that I would recommend, and this is one of them. The symbol glossary (which makes up the bulk of the book) is the most useful part.

Tea Cup Reading, by Sasha Fenton. This book goes into some detail (quite a bit, actually) about the history of tea and coffee, and, better yet, how to prepare them in the traditional fashion! A lot of traditional lore is described, as well.

Scrying, etc.

Scrying for Beginners, by Donald Tyson. This is really a surprise find, as I don’t usually expect much from this series, by Tyson knows his history and goes far beyond simple exercises for scrying. He is a bit biased towards mirror and crystal-gazing techniques, but does discuss other methods.

Psychic Development for Beginners, by William Hewitt. Readable, and offers some very practical developmental exercises for those wishing to hone extrasensory abilities. Be prepared to sort through a lot of woo, though.

you say i’m a dreamer, but i’m not the only one.

Rating: Mature
Words: 58,350  
completed

Tags: angst, obviously there’s angst, dreams and nightmares, dreamer!Neil, andreil, you could almost say this was a sleeping beauty retelling, almost

Neil Josten wouldn’t say his life was very magical.
His dreams on the other hand.
They always seem too real.

And then there’s the fact that he finds himself returning to one person’s dreams.


[READ HERE]

[Revised 11/1/17] Book Recommendations for Witches, Spellcasters, and the Curious

I periodically (usually once a year) make an updated post of my annotated bibliographies for witchcraft, magick, and divination studies. I recently noticed that I hadn’t done this in a long time! 

Since I’ve read a lot of new books in that time, and since many are worth adding, I thought I’d go ahead and post an updated list. 

I’ve added just ten new ones this time! Unfortunately, still, it’s getting quite long, so I’m splitting it into two posts - one for divination, and one for magick/witchcraft.  I will be tagging both as #long and #long+post because I realize this is pretty extreme in terms of length.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Of Witchcraft and Whimsy, by Rose Orriculum. Written by Tumblr’s own @orriculum, this is one of the best, most modern an no-nonsense Craft introductory books I’ve seen. It’s unabashedly up-to-date and self-aware in its portrayal of the contemporary Craft.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Spirit Conjuring for Witches, by Frater Barrabbas. Frater B. is a very learned and rather famous magician and witch. This book is mostly geared towards Wicca, but even if you’re not Wiccan, his techniques are innovative and interesting, many utterly unlike anything I’ve seen elsewhere.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after readingEnergy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Rider by Eric De Vries. Considered a classic on this subject, this book contains a lot of good information on making the jump across the Hedge, but with a lot of editorializing about “true witchcraft,” etc. A mixed bag, but still recommended.

To Fly by Night, edited by Veronica Cummer. This is an anthology about hedgecraft by many different authors. The essays vary in quality but there’s something for everyone, and the text doesn’t shy away from tough topics, either.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Practical Astrology for Witches and Pagans, by Ivo Dominguez, Jr. This book, unlike most astrology texts, won’t tell you much about interpreting a chart - instead, it’s an entire book on timing your magick with the stars!

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

A Handbook of Saxon Sorcery and Magic, by Alric Albertsson. I really enjoyed this little book, which focuses on older magical traditions common among the ancient Saxons. It is very much introductory, but worth a read for those new to those traditions.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

The Hearth Witch’s Compendium, by Anna Franklin. This book is essentially a recipe book for various home remedies and magical purposes. For the most part, it focuses on healing work, but there’s some great tips in there for making your own cleaning products and such, too. Highly recommended.

Magical Housekeeping, by Tess Whitehurst. This is worth reading if you keep your own house/apartment and are looking for practical magical techniques for cleanliness and inviting harmony into your spaces. It could be more detailed, but I enjoyed it.

A Kitchen Witch’s Cookbook, by Patricia Telesco. This is a recipe book. It is mainly geared towards Wiccans and those who celebrate the eight sabbats, but the dishes are tasty and sure to please anyone.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I havemajor issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

Derpy faces of three of my personal OC’s: Karra, Heather and Pticenoga x)

They have some common features in their appearance & a bit of personality, but  characters are different anyway.

…and I’m able to touch my nose by my tongue.

one who can only find his way by moonlight

for @nurseyweek, day 6: dreamer

The first time it happens, Derek is seven years old and having a nightmare.

He’s dreaming of the counselor his parents had made him see after the divorce, the mean one, the one who had pushed and pushed and pushed him to talk even after he’d started to cry and said he didn’t want to. He’s pushing in the dream, too, and finally, Derek, in his dream, thinks, with all of his might, I want my mom.

And then he’s not in his dream anymore. He’s somewhere else.

Keep reading

Types Of Witches

This is a post on the many different types of witches. Due to the fact there are so many different types of them, I probably missed a couple, and this list isn’t complete. You do not have to be only one type of these witches, but can be a multitude of them, and you do not have to feel limited to fit in to any of these. In order for a type of witch to appear on this list someone must be identifying with it. If you are not represented here, or misrepresented here please tell me, and I will change it.

Witch: A witch is a practitioner of witchcraft. There are no other requirements to be a witch besides the act of practicing witchcraft, because of this anyone can be a witch regardless of age, gender, sexuality, race, religion, or any other factor. Witchcraft is defined as the practice of magick primarily but not limited to the practice of thaumaturgy.

Male Witch: Are witches who happened to be males. Though this term is not necessary, because the word witch is already gender neutral.

Baby Witch / Newbie Witch / Witchling: Are witches who are new to the practice, or feel that they are not quite witches yet.

Elemental Witch: Are witches that work with all of the western classic elements. These elements being fire, water, earth, air, and spirit. Some elemental witches choose not to also incorporate the element of spirit.

Fire Witch: Are witches that work with the element of fire, and the energies that it possesses. They would work with things such as candle magick, fire elementals, bonfire rituals, and fire scrying among other things that are related to fire.

Water Witch: Are witches that work with the element of water, and the energies that it possesses. They would work with things such as different types of water, water elementals, and water scrying among other things that are related to water.

Earth Witch: Are witches that work with the element of earth, and the energies that it possesses. They would work with things such as crystal, herbs, rocks, earth elementals, the spirit of the land, and other earth-based things.

Air Witch: Are witches that work with the element of air, and the energies that it possesses. They would work with things such as air elementals, incense, and rhythmic breathing.

Crystal Witch: Are witches that use crystals in their practice. They will practice such things as crystal healing, communicating with crystal spirits, and crystal grids, among other things that has to do with crystals.

Herbal Witch: Are witches that use herbs in their practice. They will usually grow herbs, and will use these herbs in many different ways in order to produce magickal effects such as burning them, turning them into tea, or sprinkling them around places.

Tea Witch: Are witches that use tea in their practice in order to facilitate certain effects through the act of drinking certain teas.

Keep reading

We are witches:

I adore this community and every witch that plays a part in it. I figured out a wonderful way for us to share about ourselves and our crafts. Here’s how it works: Reblog and type the numbers that apply to you. I am going to keep it somewhat vague, so don’t fret over specifics- however, if you feel that your craft contains something really important that isn’t mentioned, don’t be afraid to add it. 

Basic Beliefs: 

1: Magic is a real force that exists without human perception.
2: Magic holds power only if you believe in it.
3: Magic is inherently good.
4: Magic is inherently dark.
5: Magic is inherently neutral.
6: Magic has rules.
7: Magic has no limitations beyond the physical.
8: Magic has no limitations.

Practices:

9: My magic involves a deity/deities
10: My magic involves heavenly bodies.
11: My magic involves spirits (Fae, Angels, Demons, etc.)
12: My magic involves elements (4-8 basic elements)
13: My magic involves chemistry (scientifically recognized elements.)
14: My magic involves crystals and stones.
15: My magic involves herbs and other plants.
16: My magic involves tools. (cauldron, athame, besom, etc.)
17: My magic is traditional.
18: My craft is my own creation.
19: My craft has been handed down to me.
20: My craft is white.
21: My craft is dark.
22: My craft is in between or fluctuates.
23: My craft is new. (created within the last 50 years.)

Spellwork:

24: I create sigils.
25: I create potions.
26: I create spell jars.
27: I create spell bags.
28: I create Enchanted Items.
29: I create ceremonies.
30: I create rituals.

Schools of focus:

31: I focus in Divination.
32: I focus in Blessings.
33: I focus in Curses and/or Hexes.
34: I focus in Enchanting.
35: I focus in Astrology.
36: I focus in Spirit Work.
37: I focus in the Astral.
38: I focus in Healing.
39: I focus in Energy Work.
40: I focus in Psychic Abilities. 
41: I focus in Dreamwalking.
42: I focus in Necromancy.
43: I focus in Herbology.

A Dreamwalker’s prayer

Shadowbinder let me fall asleep easily in the night’s embrace.

Arcanist let my dreams lead me truly to the sacred space.

Flamecaller temper my passion, so I fear no delusion.

Stormcatcher train me so I can reach the right conclusion.  

and

Tidelord give my mind peace in this sea of confusion.


Plaguebringer fight back the turmoil of this heart.

Gladekeeper cultivate beauty so healing may start.

Icewarden create a shield, so I do not falter under this world’s blight. 

Windsinger give unto me the sword of creativity, so that I may use the world around me to fight.

Lightweaver give me vision to see the truth of this world, so I know what must be done.

and

Earthshaker give me strength to wake with the rising of the sun.

YOI Fan Rec Friday

(24/3/17)

Thank you for all your recommendations this week! 

Rec’d by @yuurioniceismylife​ and anonymous:
the ship of dreams by casscaixn, laurxnts, Explicit, 50k (WIP)
Yuuri and Victor board the Titanic having never crossed paths—Yuuri had won his tickets in a last-minute game of cards, Victor had boarded as the first-class son of a business tycoon, destined to inherit his father’s millions. The last thing they expect is to be caught up in each others’ lives, and to become desperately entangled in a love affair that threatens to ruin them both.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
The Start Of Life by livixbobbiex, Explicit, 20k
After winning a bet, Yuuri had been overjoyed that he’d managed to avoid having a large, celebrity style wedding, in exchange for allowing Viktor to plan and have full control over their honeymoon. Yuuri had been mentally preparing himself for flamboyant luxury, only to land up in a ‘middle of nowhere’ town in provincial Russia.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
What you should know about dating a man with children by SassySalchow (diedraechin), Gen, 2.8k
Viktor smiled at the woman even though he could feel his heart cracking into a million pieces.  “You have absolutely adorable children.” / “Yeah, Yuuri, why didn’t you tell us you had kids?” Chris asked while taking a selfie with the three. / “WHAT?!”

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
The World Opened With You by DiAnna44, Teen, 10k
Despite the smiles famous violinist Victor Nikiforov puts on for the world, he’s been in a slump for almost two years, and no longer views himself as worthy of his fame. When he’s paired up to play a duet with esteemed pianist Yuuri Katsuki, he finds inspiration once again, and maybe even something more.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by @helly-watermelonsmellinfellon:
Yuuri!!! on Floor by thehandsingsweapon, Not Rated, 67k
The gymnastics edition, in which Viktor is still a skater because he’s too pretty on ice and I couldn’t take it away from him. A story about how sometimes love comes slow and soft, and how hearts get bigger when they break.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Chasing Viktor by TheMonsterWhoWentEast, Teen, 79k (WIP)
Soulmates and soul marks were private, intimate things. He’s heard about them in passing, from the hushed voices of his parents, the drunken slurring of his older sister and ballet teacher, and the quiet, but sweet whispers of his friends from the rink. The day Yuuri Katsuki finds his soul mark, he was nursing a throbbing headache and a terrible hangover.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
November’s Secret by LanaBerry, Mature, 18k (WIP)
Overwhelmed with anxiety and his fear of failing, Yuuri faces the issue of if he should continue skating. His best friend, Yuko, proposes a solution - if no one knows it’s you, then it’s less embarrassing, right? Yuuri begins to create a completely new disguise and persona. But it works a little too well. Before he knows it, Yuuri has become the biggest mystery of the skating world and everyone wants to know who he is. Especially Viktor Nikiforov, the idol he’s been loosely basing his new persona on for years.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by @aeriamamaduck:
Exceeding Expectations by asocialfauxpas (fuzzytomato), Explicit, 8.3k
Sighing, Yuuri took off his glasses and set them on the nightstand before he switched off the light. Somehow, he was Japan’s figure skating champion, GPF silver medalist, Viktor Nikiforov’s live-in fiancé, and still a virgin.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
In Our Dreams by phoenixwaller, Explicit, 44k (WIP)

Victor Nikiforov, the Junior World Figure Skating Gold Medalist, has a secret skill. He has the ability to dreamwalk; to visit the minds of others while his body sleeps. The evening after his Junior Worlds exhibition performance he finds himself in the mind of a young Japanese skater, Yuri Katsuki. He feels the boy’s awe at watching the performance, and is overwhelmed at Yuri’s desire to skate against the Russian one day.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Beautiful by saltycvs, Explicit, 8.9k (WIP)
At 23 years old, Yuuri Katsuki is still a virgin, lives with his best friend Phitchit, and eats 2 minute ramen noodles on a daily. He has a Russian tutor, Viktor, who’s way too hot for his own good. They have one hour lessons every Thursday. Here’s the catch: it’s all for Yuuri’s gay erotica novel because he’s a trashy romance writer.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous and anonymous:
& Action!!! by Inu_Sensei, Explicit, 32k (WIP)
Viktor Nikiforov five tine Oscar winning actor from Russia and now employed on the biggest acting company in Asia and collaborates with its newest and ‘Rising Asian Action Star’ from Hasetsu together. Will he be able to cope with the new genre that he chose or will he be having trouble with his co-star?

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous and anonymous:
Ink on Ice by Daughter of Vayu (aquaregia), Teen, 43k
Because a mangaka and figure skater just didn’t mix together. Or so people thought until they saw Katsuki Yuuri and Viktor Nikiforov.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
premier dans mon coeur by aphhun, Teen, 43k (WIP)
Viktor Nikiforov is the top standard for men’s figure skating, aiming to win his sixth consecutive Grand Prix Series. However, he’s been lacking inspiration in recent years. Yuuri Katsuki is the newest premier danseur of the Bolshoi Ballet, and accompanies Lilia to assist in training the up and coming Yuri Plisetsky. All the while, Yuuri’s trying to prepare for his own debut.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Blue Roses by Fauks, Gen, 40k
The royalty, ABO Soulmate AU that no one asked for.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by @chessala:
Through A Mirror Darkly by Chessala, Teen, 3.5k
When 13-years old Yuuri finds a mirror in the hot springs storage room, he certainly didn’t expect to meet a boy called Viktor through it. What he expected even less was the way in which this meeting would twist his life in the years to come.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Take Me Home by AlexLKerr, Gen, 2.5k
Yuuri’s having a rough time settling into Saint Petersburg. Victor’s there for him.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
The Way to a Man’s Heart is Through His Stomach by futuresoon, Explicit, 17k (WIP)
In desperate need of a new job and a new apartment, recently unemployed baker Yuuri Katsuki moves to a part of the city he doesn’t know much about and gets a position in a family friend’s bakery he’s never been to. But the people there are kind of weird, and the bakery gets some strange orders. At least one of his neighbors is nice. Probably not human, and has weird eating habits, but nice.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Finally, I Can Show My True Skill by RoseusJaeger, Mature, 17k (WIP)
Yuuri is finally playing osu! for the first time since his major failure at the osu! World Cup the year before. He returns to be greeted by top players and ultimately by elite mapper, and his very idol, Viktor Nikiforov. Now that he’s returned to the game he once succeeded at, how will he fight his way to the top? As a pro-player or the path of a respected mapper?

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
shine on, shine on (until there isn’t darkness) by yukilee, Gen, 2.3k (WIP)
In which yuuri is fighting his way up the entertainment chain—some place beside viktor, and tumblr decided to pop in and say hello.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Quadruple Flip by haganenoheichou (bondageluvr), Mature, 16k
Viktor Nikiforov didn’t quit skating to look for inspiration. He quit skating because of his damn knee.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Etched Glass by shulkie, Mature, 5.9k (Major Character Death)
Viktor is a glassmaker for Yakov’s time piece shop. On his free days he skates on the frozen shores outside their village. After he saves an injured seal, a mysterious and handsome stranger appears on the shore and follows him home, but Viktor can’t persuade him to stay.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Comfort Food by youaremarvelous, Mature, 20k (WIP)
Viktor is a wildly popular male model who is in crisis over aging out of the industry. He runs into Yuuri, an international university student struggling to make friends in the big city, and decides to make him his pet project. Unfortunately, matchmaking isn’t as easy as he thought it would be—especially when he starts developing complicated feelings for his client.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
The Rules For Lovers by ADreamingSongbird, Teen, 86k (WIP)
Prince Yuuri Katsuki has a duty to his country, above all else (his desires, his dreams, and his happiness included), and he knows this alliance will help to ensure the safety of his people. That’s the only reason he accepts Prince Nikiforov’s hand in marriage. The pleasant surprise, of course, is the part where they fall in love along the way. The unpleasant one, well…
That’s a long story.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
‘Cause I’m a Taker, 'Cause I’m a Giver, It’s Only Nature by ken_ichijouji (dommific), Explicit, 61k (WIP)
The story of how Yuuri Katsuki slept with, dated, fell in love with, and married Victor Nikiforov. Yes, in that order.

✧・゚: *✧・゚:*    *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
not gold like in your dreams by ebenroot, Teen, 39k (WIP)
Victor honestly didn’t know what he was expecting when he put out the ad for a roommate to help pay rent for his apartment.


Thank you for all your recs! ₍₍ (̨̡ ‾᷄♡‾᷅ )̧̢ ₎₎

The amazing “YOI Fan Rec Friday” banner was created by @omgkatsudonplease! Check out their blog!

5

Some pictures with my old harpy character Pticenoga, I’ve already posted an art with her :)
She first appeared on the 8th of March, 2011 in one of my usual weid dreams, and looked a bit different from her current state. But the main purpose is still the same x)

How it went down

In the past, I feel I’ve made it abundantly clear that I do not like it when people speculate that Rose Quartz was pink diamond.

It’s not that it’s impossible: because really it isn’t. We know for a fact that as an extension of Steven’s empath abilities, he can swap bodies with other gems, as well as humans and even watermelons. The mechanic exists for Rose and PD to swap bodies, and seems to have been introduced for the sole purpose of giving us a hint

It isn’t a lack of foreshadowing that spoils it for me either. All the foreshadowing that existed before it became obvious that Rose had the body of a quartz still stands, both for Rose and for Lion. For fuck’s sake. I can see why Pearl would might still have a pink diamond on her uniforms, but Garnet, Sardonyx and Baby Steven have no excuse!

No, what pisses me off about these theorists is that I have yet to see a variation that does NOT make Rose/PD look like a sociopathic idiot. See, the core flaw with these theories is and always has been that Pink Diamond stole a Rose Quartz’s body then killed her for reasons that make no sense.

If she had wanted to protect earth, she could have easily done more easily as herself, and wouldn’t have to murder a bunch of other gems in cold blood to do so. She would have had the political power, the control over the planet, and she wouldn’t be hunted for regicide!

Of course, all these wrinkles iron out if we change one tiny thing; Body swapping wasn’t Pink Diamond’s Ability, It was Rose’s!

See, if we assume it was Rose Quartz –the original Rose Quartz – who stole PD’s body, suddenly everything falls into place.

First, we have the motivation: There is no reason why Pink Diamond would have wanted to be a quartz, but there is every reason why a Rose Quartz would want to be a Pink Diamond. All this Rose had to do is mind swap with PD, and once that’s done it’s her power. Pinkie would be unable to switch back!

Second, we have a reason to believe mind-swapping was always Rose’s power. It’s never been more clear than in the past few episodes that Steven is not simply empathetic in the mundane sense, he’s actually an Empath, a type of telepath who can feel other’s emotions through a psychic connection rather than mere sympathy. This power is vital to a Rose Quartz, who needs to be able to physically feel a patient’s pain to cry healing tears. Since Empaths are a form of Telepath, mind-connection powers like dreamwalking and body snatching are actually part of the package deal!

Third, it’s a situation that morally and strategically justifies Pink Diamond’s actions. If Pink Diamond wanted to protect earth she could do more easily as the planet’s ruler than as a soldier who just committed regicide, and she wouldn’t need to switch bodies with an innocent rose quartz and then murder her in cold blood to do so. Even if the Rose consented, it would still be completely unjustified, but if it was her body that was stolen Pink would be absolved of all responsibility.

Now usurped, trapped in a new form and possibly hunted by the soldier who stole her body, Pink Diamond had no choice left but to rebel, and this would give Rose every justification she would need to implement part two

Never forget, Quartzes are soldiers, military tacticians. If this Rose stole the body of a diamond, then any other one could as well. Rose Quartz couldn’t have that happening, so she had her sisters poofed and imprisoned in bubbles, leaving them trapped in stasis and unable to do the same to her.

Now Rose was in a tough situation. Pink Diamond, – who we knew up until this point as Rose – Was fascinated by earth. If their sister suddenly lost her love for humans, the other diamonds would become suspicious. Rose Quartz would have to play the part. Thus, the human zoo was born.

As for Pink Diamond, she would was now leading a rebellion, but nobody would believe her if she claimed to be the real Diamond authority. Hell, many of her followers may have been like Bismuth: resentful of their former leaders and hungry for shards. No, the only people Pink Diamond could trust were her closest followers. Pearl and Garnet and possibly a few more. Only they knew they were really doing the duty of a queen, and that’s why even millennia after the war ended they and their fusions still bore pink diamonds on their shirts shoes and pants.

In the end, Pink Diamond was never able to take back her body, but she couldn’t let Rose use her body for tyranny anymore. The die was cast, a diamond fell, and a quartz and her pearl watched the miracle of a new beginning.

Pink took her body, her usurper and shards, a remnant of the life she hand long left behind. These would later be fed to the lions who followed her, creating a pet left for Steven when he needed it most.

All theories are true on this one, they all fit into place. I’m just glad I was finally able to make order out of these disparate parts