drawing-conclusions

anonymous asked:

Nah dude, it was possession. His body physically changed when his sister took charge (compare the sprites). Also, don't you think the way his sister spoke to him was a little controlling? Not to make him out to be sympathetic or anything but ya can't just ignore that, right?

“Of course we can’t… but we still do not know what condition he will return in, so we can’t draw any conclusions until we actually see him…”

do you ever see someone’s comment about a film/tv show you watch or a book you’ve read and wonder if maybe we all truly live in different realities and the internet is the only commonly shared space which doesn’t change across universes, because it isn’t fucking possible to draw such dumbass conclusions about a thing unless we’ve seen/read different versions of it

I’ve seen several posts going around about obvious furry porn getting put up in high-class art museums, where the general thrust is all “ha ha, those ivory tower snobs don’t even realise they’re putting furry porn in their art galleries, because they’re not Internet Savvy like we are!”

Let’s leave aside for the moment the question of whether this is a reasonable conclusion to draw, and assume for the sake of argument that art museums are, indeed, being bamboozled into putting weird fetish porn on their walls due to lack of cultural context on the part of their curators.

Now, take a step back and consider: what are the odds that this is the first period in history where these sorts of shenanigans have occurred?

Indeed, what confidence do we have that it hasn’t been happening constantly throughout the history of Western art?

How many of the respected works of eras past that we genuflect over every day are, in fact, weird fetish porn that we ourselves lack the cultural context to correctly identify as such?

anonymous asked:

Any advice on how to write a heist story something like oceans Eleven?

Well, you can start by watching Ocean’s Eleven, and Ocean’s Eleven, and then Leverage, and then Burn Notice, and then The A-Team, and then Mission: Impossible, and then all the other heist stories like The Italian Job or Heat. Watch, read, uncover as many stories about criminals as you can from fiction to nonfiction to reading security analyst blogs. Read the spy memoirs, the thief memoirs, the fake ones and the real ones. Check out magicians, hypnotists, card tricks, and sleight of hand. Watch the making ofs and director’s commentaries looking for clues behind the thought process of these stories. The hows and the whys as you look into the research they did. Burn Notice, for example, is famous for using stunt props and technological rigs that work in real life. Like using cell phones to create cheap bugs on the go.

The worlds of criminal fiction and spy fiction rely on being able to present (or convincingly fake) a world which feels real. A heist is all about exploitation. So, you need a world with security structures to exploit. You’ve got to know how things work before you can craft a way to break them. Social engineering, hacking, and every other criminal skill is about breaking the systems in place. So, you’ve got to get a baseline for how law enforcement and security analysts work. What security systems are set up to look like. The ways we go about discouraging thieves. Better yet how people behave. Real, honest to god human behavior.

So, you know, pick somewhere in order to start your research. Get an idea of what you want write about stealing, then learn everything about the object, the museum, the city, the country, and its customs as you can.

If you’re setting a heist in a futuristic or fantasy setting then luck you, you get to make all of it up.

Learning the plot structure and conventions of the heist genre is the first step. This means watching lots and lots of heist movies, shows, and reading books. Over time, as you become better at critical analysis, you’ll begin to see specific story structures and character archetypes emerge.

The Heist Story is a genre. Like every other genre, it comes with its own structure, cliches, archetypes, plots, and genre conventions which necessitate the narrative. The better grasp you have of those, the better you’ll be at writing a heist.

For example, a heist story like Ocean’s Eleven relies on a collection of thieves rather than a single individual. The character types are as follows:

The Pointman - Your planner, strategist, team leader, and the Jack of All Trades. Can also be called the Mastermind. They’re the one who can take the place of anyone on the team should they fall through. They’re not as good as a specialist, but they’re very flexible. Narratively, he plans the cons and subs in where he’s needed.

The Faceman - Your experienced Grifter, here for all your social engineering needs. These guys talk their way in.

The Infiltrator - Your cat burglar or break-in artist. Basically, the conventional genre thief. Your Parker, Catwoman, Sam Fisher, or Solid Snake. The stealth bastards, they’re all about silent in, out, and playing acrobatic games with the lasers.

The Hacker - The electronics and demolitions specialist. Usually this is the guy in the van overseeing stuff remotely. Your Eye in the Sky. Their skill set can be split up and swapped around as necessary.

The Muscle - The one who is good at fighting. They’re combat focused characters, usually with mercenary and special forces backgrounds. Though, that’s optional.

The Wheelman - The one who handles the getaway. They’re your often overlooked transport specialists. It’s not just that they can drive, they’re skilled at getting lots of people around, figuring out how to move your valuables, and exiting hostile cities or countries undetected. They get the team in and they get them out.

For an example of these archetypes, I’m going to use Leverage. Nathan Ford, The Pointman (technically, he’s written like a Faceman). Sophie Devereaux , The Faceman. Parker, the Infiltrator. Hardison, the Hacker. Eliot, the Muscle. They all take turns being the Wheelman.

Other examples like Burn Notice: Michael Westen, the Pointman. Sam Axe, the Faceman. Fiona, the Muscle. They all take turns with explosives, Michael will invariably take all the roles during the course of the show.

Ocean’s Eleven has multiple variants of these archetypes, all broken down and mixed up.

You can mix and match these qualities into different individuals or break them apart like in Ocean’s Eleven, and more than one character can fill more than one role, but that’s the basic breakdown. For example, your hacker doesn’t need to be a guy in a van overlooking the whole security grid. One guy or girl with a cell phone can sit in the lobby of a building with an unsecured wireless network and crack the security. Welcome to the 21st century. The skills don’t necessarily need to take the specific expected shape.

What you do need is the basic breakdown:  You need someone to plan the con, you need someone to be your face or grifter, you need someone to break in, you need someone to watch the security/electronics, you need muscle to back you up, and someone’s got to cover the getaway.

These shift depending on your plan, but this is the expected lineup for a heist narrative. The first step of a heist narrative is not the plan because we don’t have one yet. We’ve got an idea. Pick your target. Maybe it’s a famous painting. Maybe it’s a casino. Maybe it’s a rare artifact from a private investor’s collection loaned to a museum for a short period of time. Maybe it’s art stolen by the Nazis during WWII. Whatever it is, figure it out.

The next step is simple. If you want the thing, you’ve got to find a way to get it. This is a big job, your standard thief won’t be able to pull it off alone. So, you gotta go recruiting. Get your team together. Make sure to establish the goals of the different members for joining. Who they are. Their pedigree. One might be an old flame or an old enemy. This is where we lay out some character driven subplots.

When everyone’s together, we’ve got to lay out the plan. Before we have a plan though, we need to establish where the object is and the issues in getting it. Why this has never been done before. So, what are the challenges? Invariably, an object worth a great deal of money will have a lot of security protecting it. Figure out what that security is, who the item belongs to, what sort of retribution do the thieves face beyond what they might expect. Lasers, pressure plates, cameras, security, other career criminals, mob bosses, the rich and powerful, whatever.

After that: How do you get it? Then you’ve got to plan the con, while taking everything into account.

Then, We prep the Con. There will be steps to take before the con can be put into place, your characters taking their positions in plain sight. Stealing whatever pieces you need to make it work. Casing the joint. Etc.

Then: Run the Con. This is the part with the actual stealing. Better known as the first attempt. Things go well, there may be a few mistakes, but things are going well and then we…

Encounter Resistance. While running the con, something goes wrong, pieces fall apart, the thieves come close to success but the object gets moved and they suddenly need a new plan. New information may pop up, it may be one of your artists was running a con of their own separate from the rest. If there’s a double cross in the works then this may be when and where it lands.

We’re ready now, so it’s time hit up: Steal the Thing, Round Two. Your characters put their new plan into play and get about thieving the object of their desire.

Lastly: The Get Away. This is the part where your thieves make for the hills with their stolen treasure. This can be short or long depending on the kind of story you’re telling and other double crosses may occur here. It could be the end of the story or the beginning of a new heist.

Heist stories are like mystery novels. They’re all about sleight of hand and misdirection. You’ve got to keep just enough information on the table to keep your audience on the hook, and just enough information off the table to surprise them later on the twist. Yet, when they go back to re-read the novel again, they’ll find the answer was there all along. They just didn’t see it coming.

If anything, learning how to write a well-done heist or a mystery or any kind of novel in this genre will teach you a lot about how to manage your foreshadowing and create superb plot twists. Like any good con, you need to lay out all the conflicting pieces where people can see them, let them draw their own conclusions, withhold the critical context, and then hit them with the whammy.

Like lots of audiences, new writers (and even some old ones) can get distracted by the shock and awe. They see they’re impressed by the conclusion, not the lay-up. If you want to write any kind of fiction, you need to learn to see past the curtain and pay attention to the critical pieces leading into an important moment rather than the moment itself.

Good writing isn’t modular, you can’t just strip out pieces and run with them because you’ll end up missing the crucial, sometimes innocuous pieces that ensured the scene worked. Like the Victorian Hand Touch, every moment between the two leads and most of their scenes with secondary players are working for that singular instance of eventual, gleeful catharsis.

If you’ve got a plot twist coming in your novel, every sentence from the second you start writing is working towards it. You start laying out your pieces, funneling in your tricks, and playing with misdirection. You may have multiple twists, to cover yourself, divert your audience, congratulate them for successfully guessing your ploy, and reassure their initial suspicions before catching them again on the upswing.

The clever writer is as much a con artist as their characters. The only difference is the target of their con is their audience. The tricks in their bag are narrative ones, and they work with the understanding that it doesn’t matter if someone guesses the end so long as they’re entertained by the journey. A great story stays entertaining long after the audience has figured out all the twists.

So, don’t get caught up in Red Herrings and frightened about not being able to outsmart other people. Tell a good story with conviction and heart about a bunch of crooks out to steal their heart’s desire.

That’s all there is to it.

-Michi

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Sometimes we create problems out of simple circumstances. We allow for our minds to draw up exaggerated conclusions. We fear things that may or may not actually exist. Try not to be scared. Try not to worry. Try not to allow life’s dips and curves to stun your inner warrior.
—  Nicole Addison @thepowerwithin
Mercury Signs

Mercury in Aries: You never slow down and you want to jump to conclusions; Your mind is quick as lightning and you have a direct and energetic way of expressing yourself. Although you may be impatient, competitive, irritable and often having difficulty concentrating, you are never boring or tasteless (when people know you). You are ready to dictate your law if necessary. You express yourself in an authoritarian way, and people generally know what you are thinking. (If Mercury is in your twelfth house, you will try to conceal your opinions, but generally without success)

Mercury in Taurus: You are thoughtful, conservative and remarkably sensible. You study the facts, construct carefully an argument, and present it diplomatically. After that, it is very unlikely that you will change your mind. Having made a reasoned decision with the necessary time, you see no reason to change your opinion. You tend to be inflexible, and it’s hard to talk to you, partly because it’s not easy for you to open up new ideas.

Mercury in Gemini: You are intelligent, curious, insightful, playful and playful, expeditious and incredibly clear. Your intellectual speed and intellectual agility are extraordinary. Your mind readily embraces, and you can talk like a mill. But you can also bow to the wind. You are far too adaptable, and you can reason on anything.

Mercury in Cancer: Sensitive and understanding, you are intuitive, thoughtful and available to listen. You can communicate with compassion, and you can absorb information so easily that it seems from time to time that you are a soothsayer. You have an astounding memory. But your moods sometimes flood your discernment and you tend to take your desires for realities.

Mercury in Leo: Theatrical, full of dignity and ambitious, you think creatively, express yourself in a colorful way and you have confidence in your opinions (less so Sun in Cancer). You never lose sight of the whole situation. You are persuasive, eloquent, and your thinking process is organized. You can also be dogmatic and bragging, but unreservedly in your enthusiasm - as often happens with positions of planets in Leo, your heat controls your tendency to brag and prevail over it.

Mercury in Virgo: You are intelligent, subtle, persistent, knowledgeable, astute, analytical and purposeful. Nothing escapes you, and especially not the logical inconsistencies. Idealist who secretly deplores the discrepancy between the state in which things are and the state in which they ought to be, you may be fussy, and exercise the profession of criticism, or of attorney. But you are also a brilliant thinker and a leading talker. Be confident: you have a fine mind.

Mercury in Libra: With your rational thinking and elegant speech, you are looking for a balanced perspective and intuitively understand that the best solution is usually the simplest. Prudent, discreet and endowed with a strong aesthetic sense, you are charming, objective and diplomatic. The opinions of those you respect are of interest to you. But in the secrecy of your mind, your thoughts oscillate from one position to another, you are prey to uncertainty and you will take time to arrive at a reasoned decision.

Mercury in Scorpio: You possess a penetrating and resourceful mind, which is constantly probing the underside of the surface. You never take anything for cash, so you often suffer from suspicion and even paranoia. But you are also analytical, sagacious, able to find all kinds of information. This is an excellent position for a detective, researcher or therapist. Mas it can be dangerous because it also confers a biting spirit and tendency to use words as a weapon.

Mercury in Sagittarius: You have a research intellect and a broad breadth of mind. Reflecting on the big questions, as you love to do, inspires you and gives you greatness in your philosophy of life. You like to speak well, and you are distracting and wise. But you can also be dogmatic, hypocritical and weak when you get into the details, and direct to the point of lacking tact. Your sense of humor saves you.

Mercury in Capricorn: Methodical, realistic and organized, you are a systematic thinker. You do your homework ; You concentrate; You act as an adult. Although you may be conventional, rigid and pessimistic, you try to be impartial and cautious to draw your conclusions, even if this means that you must overcome your prejudices. Thinker applied, you are responsible enough to make sure of what you advance, and you communicate clearly and thoughtfully.

Mercury in Aquarius: Fed with ideas, you possess an inventive spirit, often brilliant. Turning to progress, human and happy when you commit to a cause, you express yourself in a unique way and you have flashes of inspiration that often bring you an excellent understanding of things. You can completely pack yourself up for a social problem or for an abstract theory. But you can also attach yourself to an idea to the point of becoming inflexible, and deny that facts - or people - hinder you.

Mercury in Pisces: Any planet in Pisces brings the triumph of feelings on the facts. You react instinctively to people and situations, often making the right decision without knowing why. You understand how people work. And you adapt easily to changing circumstances. Your mind is receptive, subtle, compassionate and imaginative, but logic is not your forte. On the other hand, you have easy access to your intuition, which is a river of impressions and instincts that flows just below your conscious thoughts.

Enough excuses for parents who abused their kids but “meant the best”. They “meant the best” for themselves, not for the kids. It’s fucking easy to just rely on emotional abuse, threats, humiliation, shame, guilt and violence to get your way and to force your kid to stay in control and to sabotage and fuck up the child’s life so you would feel good about it, and then to just remind yourself “i meant the best” to feel no guilt about doing so whatsoever. Just repeating to yourself “it doesn’t hurt them” and “they deserved it”  while actively forcing your child to keep all the obvious trauma symptoms out of sight or ensuring the child believes it’s their own damn fault for feeling the way they do.

You know what’s not easy? Having your parent force control of your life via emotional abuse, threats, shame, humiliation, violence. Your parent getting into your own head and  gaslighting your senses until you feel worthless and insane and like a monster, until you don’t dare to feel your own feelings, until you’re ashamed of the pain you feel and can’t see yourself as anything other than a horrible burden and nothing you do can ever change that or make you good enough. You know what’s even harder? Still believing that your parent “meant the best” and not even daring to blame them and still being forced to draw the conclusion that it was after all, all your fault, for existing as you do, for being who you are, for not ever being good enough! And then, on top of all of it, hearing the rest of the world agree with the parent’s view, pressuring you to never blame them, to forgive them, to never hold them responsible, to “be better” and understand them, to not ever try to place blame on anyone but yourself because then you’re the monster.

Just. How. Is. One. Supposed. To. Heal. From. That.
Healing can’t even begin until the blame is placed on the parent! This person literally benefited from their child’s suffering! They did not get affected negatively from it at all, they didn’t even care, they walked away satisfied and getting what they wanted while the child now has a lifetime of traumatic consequences and mental illness problems! Their freedom is taken away, their quality of life reduced, their relationships and friendships sabotaged, their confidence crushed! They’re placed at extra risk for addictions and obsessions because they keep falling into the black pit of trauma no matter how hard they try to distract and their life is heavy and painful no matter how well they do afterwards! Their brain can’t regulate stress properly anymore! Abuse causes literal brain damage and all this is just so the parents would get their way! And you all still insist they shouldn’t feel guilty about it or be faced with consequences of their abuse? They shouldn’t fucking admit to themselves and to their children what they’ve done? If the truth will kill them, let them die. Abused children’s right to heal comes way before the abusers feeling good about themselves.

How Sony deals with fandoms

I’ve been to an international in-house PR summit hosted by one of my clients this week and nearly fell off my chair when one of the guest speakers was a VERY important person from Sony Music Entertainment. Let’s call him John. I won’t disclose his function and real name because I don’t want to reveal where I was, but based on his title he definitely knows what he‘s saying and has a lot of industry experience.

His speech was mainly  about how to engage with a variety of different target audiences. Of bloody course one of the first slides he showed was a picture of 1D engaging with fans which was supposed to drive the point home that there are some audiences who are more passionate about a brand than others.He mentioned then that he’s worked with 1D on their albums which drove me into a bit of a freeze.

Because I’m embarrassing, I recorded parts of his speech on my phone and wrote the most important things down to share some interesting insights he gave about how Sony manages their artists’ target audiences, crafts their artists’ social media actions and deals with the fact that at the end of the day they always need to get people to buy music.

 

HOW DOES SONY UNDERSTAND AND MONITOR AUDIENCES (like fandoms for instance)?

According to John, they have their very own data-driven digital tool that helps them identify and manage different target groups for an artist (it’s not perfected yet but has been rolled out a lot of countries, I think he said 50?) and see where there might be connections to other artists, who the influencers are, what the specific target groups are or will be interested in and to identify collaboration opportunities.

Target groups are being split into four categories: Fanatics, enthusiasts, casuals, indifferents. These segments are being broken down into even smaller groups defined by age, genre preference, gender and country. They found that the older you get, the less likely you’ll be a fanatic or enthusiast.

How does Sony find this stuff out? Well, they survey polled music audiences of every age in a way that covers either nationally representatives or represent one of the major top tier cities. People shared their music preferences, consumption habits, lifestyle, media habits etc. Sony gathered all that information, analysed the insights and created their own audience understanding tool.

According to John, that way everyone at Sony has access to an interactive map of the world of Sony that looks into segmentations and audiences for every artist while being searchable in a number of different ways. The tool is pulling from real data, but they are also adding to that „with things like analytics of platforms like Spotify where we are able to gather lots of informations about user behaviours and reference that against things that we do“.

 

HOW SONY STRATEGICALLY SHAPES PR STORIES

John gave the example of Snoop Doggy Dog who had launched a new album (song? Idk) around that time: „There was a week-long debate in parliament around the legalization of Marihuana, so we just jumped on this conversation and did lots of social marketing around Snoop with his rolling papers and his spliffs… so maybe that’s bad taste, I’ll allow you to judge that for yourselves. The point is though that you are also marketing into a wider cultural context. [You need] an understanding how that works and where you can have a conversation that is seamless and not fake, genuineness is quite important.

“The way you can get people to connect is: You’ve got a lot of stuff that you want to say. Start under the assumption that people actually don’t give a shit about 95 percent of it. And then see which are the bits that might overlap. This is where the understanding of the audience really comes into its own. It forces us to think before we jump to execution. The quest for relevance is vitally important.”

Why are people to connect with a brand/band though? John thinks this is one of the most underused questions when planning an approach. Why is it that they do specific things? He gave an example: „We would normally take a record to radio because we always believe that radio is the thing that breaks the record. But if my core audience, my phase one audience – the people that are gonna give that band its first lift – are on Spotify, what am I doing on radio??“


ENGAGEMENT AROUND ARTIST IS KEY

„The thing is that you don’t start with a conversation around a product. The consumption of the product is the end point of a journey where you built an engagement and a fan. So again, for us that means that when we sit down and do our plan around our next Robbie Williams album, we start with „How are we gonna maximize the engagement around Robbie Williams“? because that will then sell us albums. Not „Okay, we’ll be releasing in a week in November, eight weeks out we need to be here, here and here“. So we’re not doing product launches anymore unless [it is suitable for the target demographic]. We have to built a tension and an engagement around an artist.“

 

ABOUT THEIR ARTISTS‘ SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS

„We run most of our artists social media channels or at least their official  pages, so we are involved in all of those conversations.“


Shocking, I know.

Based on the situation we face in this fandom,with this band, feel free to draw your own conclusions about what this information means.

HERE ARE MY KEY TAKEAWAYS:

1.       It’s not news at all, but the existence of their own audience understandig tool confirms it: the 1D fandom is being monitored, segmented and analyzed. Sony’s strategies are tightly tied to that fact. Collaborations or artist interactions such as Louis/James Arthur or One Direction/ Little Mix are most likely the result of a data-driven analysis of whose fan groups are similar and whose are likely to be open towards that particular other artist too.

2.       Again no news, but the example of Snoop Doggy Dog shows that there are strategies behind even the most random photos. Often placements of specific pictures or stories serve a wider purpose. Hello pap walks, hello b**ygate, hello Louis Twitter, hello Liam visibly being linked to L.A.‘s cool singer/songwriter crowd before his first album drop.  

3.       The decision to not promote Louis‘ song could very well have been a logical outcome of the team asking themselves the question „Why?“: Why should we promote his song with huge effort when we KNOW his own fans are going to do it passionately, especially if they think  we don’t give a shit? Why not playing that game in order to make them promo it the hardest way they can?“ Why indeed??

4.       One Direction is a huge deal for Sony. John was talking about a lot of bands during his speech but whenever he was talking about major acts, he always listed One Direction amongst them (along with gems like Beyonce, David Bowie, Adele). He name-dropped them at least 5 -6 times in a 60 minute speech. He really didn’t have to because the audience was in no way whatsoever a target audience. So yes, they clearly have been and are a very huge deal for them.

5.       The part about social media? Well :))))))

ikke snakk til meg
  • we open with sana reciting this surah, which i see as an effort from sana to try and regain focus on her faith (but you should ask the muslims in the fandom <3)
  • very violent online abuse flashes before her eyes, apparently from when she was in middle school (here’s a detailing of the abuse)
  • once again, sana’s prayer is interrupted (it’s always interrupted either by an external character, or by her own thoughts…at the end of the series we’ll see her pray uninterrupted and it will be gorgeous)
  • we get this beautiful shot of literal and metaphorical self reflection. sana is broken after the latest events and she is now trying to pick herself back up (so, of course, she tries to go back to the beginning: the sana we first saw on the show, before it all started)
  • adding the above piece of art for reasons (like to charge/reblog to cast)
  • we’ve seen sana wear very loose hijabs this season, i remember people commenting on it. here, she tightens the fabric around her neck. i see it as her trying to protect herself. she needs all the extra strength she can get. all the extra fabric between her and the world.
  • she tries to reach out for the only friend (we know of) she could have left: jamilla. but we see they never got closure on the “sharmutta incident” and, when sana scrolls up, she is reminded of how much her and jamilla differ from one another. and she gives up.
  • quick note: i am not too happy too see jamilla painted as this hating muslimah but i’ll wait until the end of the series. her comment “i was just trying to protect you” reminds me a lot of sonja, who i hated really badly when she confronted isak during the hotel scene. but who redeemed herself and explained her behaviour in the end.
  • we see their last messages are from january 2016, so just after season 1 if i’m not mistaken? the tension started then and that’s probably why sana and her were already at war during season 2.
  • anyone knows what game the norwegians are playing at the school? it looks like a dance of some sorts: the way they’re placed and the couple is running in between the two groups…
  • isak is wearing a dandelion. from twitter: løvetannbarn (dandelion child) means person that has survived almost impossible upbringing.
  • this time, the lyrics are so on the nose even the beautiful subbers decided to translate some of them: an even song. to me, reminiscent of all the rumours spread about him paralleling the rumours spread about sana right now.
  • we see the pictures from the teaser: isak’s eye, sara (same jacket), noora…
    we’re missing the brown hair with a hand ruffling them and the carrot munching (but i feel like the carrot bit was more symbolic than anything)
  • sana is back to the beginning (see above) except, this time, it’s reversed: she’s not joining the girl squad and the russbuss. she’s leaving both.
  • liar liar pants on fire
  • and she’s not trying to show, like in her first clip where she sassed vilde and told her being a russ was punished by stoning, that she can and will become a russ. she’s instead using her faith as a reason for why she doesn’t want to be a russ. very flippening, much reversal.
  • sana goes to class and…
  • the book is open on a page about dandelions.
  • which brings me to the symbolism of the dandelion. according to google, dandelion translates to “dent de lion” in french which means “lion’s tooth” (i can vouch for that), summoning the symbolic meaning of lions: courage, pride, family (connection/communication). the dandelion is also a sun symbol (#sanasol).
  • we get this exchange that i LOVE but that, unfortunately, is getting misunderstood: sana and isak are awkward around each other but both really want to talk to each other. sana, after looking at isak’s very obvious blackeye, glances at the dandelion in his hair. isak scoffs and takes it off.
    you can’t take a black eye off. you can’t get rid of that barrier between two people. but you can take a flower off. i feel like the flower, here, is a perfect way for them to (in the sweetest way) break the ice. our attention is briefly redirected from the (devastating) black eye to the (hopeful) flower and, for a moment, everything is OK.

[cont. after the “read more”]

Keep reading

The implications of that past tense are….interesting. 

Dex has known Shitty for two years. What does he call him now?

“Now KPC,” you may say, “he doesn’t really call him anything now because he’s not at Samwell anym–”

“Shhh,” I say, gently laying a finger on your supple lips, “there’s literally a panel last update where Dex and Shitty are seen cheering on the Falcs together.”

“Okay,” you concede, “but where are you going with this?”

“I’m going to the obvious conclusion:” I draw out the words before pausing for dramatic effect. “Dex, through what are probably hilariously mundane circumstances, found out Shitty’s first name.”

“Holy shit,” you whisper, stunned.

“Or rather,” I counter, “holy not Shit.”

How To Develop A Distinct Voice In Your Writing

Voice in writing is extremely important and can make or break your story as a whole. It’s imperative that you pay attention to how readers interpret your writing voice because loving the author’s storytelling style can sometimes be just as important as the story itself. Here are some tips to remember and some general rules to follow in order to make sure your writing voice is enjoyable to listen to for your audience.


General Introduction & Some Things To Note

  • Voice is an audience’s ability to read something and know you wrote it. It’s essentially your fingerprint on your work.
  • The syntax is how an author chooses to order words in a sentence and can play a large role in conveying your voice.
  • Voice does not have to be yours alone, but more on that later.

How To Develop Your Voice

Rule 1: Write Naturally

Use voice as a tool, but don’t let it control you. Don’t try to force voice into your writing. Forcing voice can make it sound awkward and push the reader away. 

Rule 2: Always Write For Clarity First

Be as clear as possible. Don’t embellish or use fancy words if unnecessary. If writing poetry, however, do the exact opposite.

Rule 3: Don’t Deviate Too Much From The Rules Of Writing

Doing this can alienate your readers. If you break the everyday rules too much and deviate from the technical conventions of writing, your readers may get distracted or lose track of what you’re trying to convey and what’s going on in the story as a whole.

Writing In Somebody Else’s Voice

A lot of authors choose to write stories from the point of view of a character in their story. Authors may also choose to write in a format that requires their voice to be that of someone who may be completely different than them. Being able to recognize small details that form a voice in your readers’ heads is very important, whether you’re telling them the story as yourself or through the eyes of another. Here are some tips on developing a voice that matches the point of view you are telling the story from:

Word Choice ~ Use words and phrases that are true to the character’s personality. If your character is a 21st-century teenager talking about some guy they’re “totally obsessed” with and want to “Netflix and Chill” with, then they probably won’t describe him as a “harrowing barbarian with golden flowing locks and a stone cold thirst for vengeance”. 

Observation ~ Be careful when describing what your narrator observes throughout the story. If your narrator is supposed to be somewhat oblivious or gullible, they won’t notice the incredibly subtle mannerisms in everyone around them in order to conveniently draw conclusions and convey every piece of information the reader needs to predict the ending of the story.

Focus ~ Be mindful of what your narrator focuses on when describing a situation or the people around them. If your narrator chooses to point out that a character they don’t like happens to have the latest Rolex, this will hint at the reader that the character has a distaste for those with lots of wealth and therefore is somewhat of the opposite of the person they dislike. The things a person focuses on can tell you a lot about who they are and what they think of the world, and that is a massive deal when it comes to voice.

Descriptions ~ How your character describes the situations and minute details is important. Whether they say “shuddered” instead of “shook” or “steamed” instead of “angry” plays a large part in the reader getting to know your narrator.


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Conditional Clauses || と、ば、たら、なら

Hey guys, today we’re gonna talk about conditionals in Japanese. Conditionals are clauses and they often describe the result of something, such as “If A, then B.” In Japanese there are many conditionals and as a beginner it might be confusing trying to work out which one conditional is appropriate to use in a situation.

と - “When A, B”:
This basically means that when/if A happens, B will happen as a consequence. You can use と in situations when the clause is in present tense - you can’t use it in a past-tense situation.

Rule = clause +と+ result

e.g. 早く行かないと、遅刻します。
        If you don’t leave soon, you will be late.

ば - "If A, then B”:
This is pretty easy to comprehend because it just means "If A happens, then B”. There aren’t any assumptions or embedded meanings in ば statements, they’re pretty straightforward. You can use ば in situations when the clause hasn’t happened yet (future tense).

Rule = clause +-えば+ result

  • verbs: change the U sound to an E sound and add ば
    (e.g. 食べるー食べれば)
  • い adj: drop the I sound and add ければ
    (e.g. 楽しいー楽しければ)
  • な adj and nouns: drop the NA sound and add であれば
    (e.g. 学生なー学生であれば)

e.g. 金持ちになれば、それを買います。
       If I become rich, I will buy it.

たら - “If A, then B is possible”:
This conditional is very similar to how you would use ば , but in order to use this conditional the clause has to be in past-tense (食べるー食べた). You can use たら in situations when you want to say what might happen if a nonexistent state came to be.

Rule = change the noun, adjective, or verb to its past tense form and add ら (e.g. 会う―会えたら)

e.g. お金があったら、旅行します。
        I will travel when I have money.

なら - "If A, how about B”:
This basically means that "if given a certain context, then this will happen”. This is a contextual clause and requires a context in order for it to be used, for example “If everybody’s going to the party, then I’ll go too”. You can use なら in situations where you’re recommending, requesting, or suggesting something, or drawing a conclusion based on the first clause.

Rule = clause + なら+ result

e.g. スーパーに行くのなら、ミルクを買ってきてください。
       If you’re going to the store, please buy some milk.

Idea: Takenaka is using his powers in this scene. He notices Reigen staring at him, and decides to listen to Reigen’s thoughts to see what’s up. But what Takenaka realizes in that process is that the man is also reading him like an open book – this telepath can hear Reigen breaking down every miniscule aspect of his current presentation, and the conclusions he’s drawing are so uncannily accurate that he might as well be a telepath himself. Being read like this is a new experience for Takenaka since he’s always been on the other side up to now, and this is honestly really unnerving for him.

For Once, Something Is Not Actually The Jedi’s Fault

A commenter on one of my fics said something that made me think of this, and now it’s bugging me.

I think the Star Wars fandom seriously underestimates, as a rule, exactly how huge a leap of logic “Palpatine is a Sith Lord” would realistically be, in-universe.

Like…there’s a reason “hiding in plain sight” is a thing. A shadowy figure operating on the fringes of the galaxy would actually be a lot easier to trace, a lot easier to identify. Sheev Palpatine is a public figure. It’s the same reason nobody assumes Clark Kent is Superman. They know who Clark Kent is! He’s got a paper trail, a tax record. He’s a reporter for a newspaper. Everyone knows who he is, where he comes from, his apartment’s address, and what he does all day. Nobody has any reason to suspect he’s secretly that alien in the red underpants who fights evil and punches meteors because they know damn well he’s a nerdy farm boy who burns Ramen. 

Palpatine’s an established figure in politics and has been for decades. He can’t be a Sith Lord because he’s right there in the public eye, passing legislation and dealing with beaurocracy and not waving a lightsaber or performing creepy Dark experiments. We know what Sith Lords do the same way we know what Superman does, and they certainly don’t complain about getting headaches from having to file form X1-138-FR629-B in triplicate with the mining guilds.

It’s Palpatine’s very establishment status that allows him to get away with being more active toward establishing the Sith empire. Because he’s just sort of always been there, when the Jedi begin looking for the source of this sudden darkness in the Force they don’t look at him. 

Why should they? When looking for the source of something that’s just recently come up, you look at what’s changed. Sheev Palpatine isn’t new. Sheev Palpatine has been there for ages, doing basically exactly what he’s doing now. 

Yeah, sure, Velorum being deposed and Palpatine being elected Chancellor is a change, but it was spurred by Amidala, and like. Padme is really, REALLY obviously not a Sith Lord. Furthermore even if they made the obvious connection between Palpatine being her advisor and the vote of no-confidence…that’s not actually an evil, suspicious move. The Senate screwed their planet over and they made the logical next step. He even makes a pretty damn convincing show of being somewhat pleasantly surprised to have been in the running, deflecting suspicion.

Even more importantly, that change, his election to Chancellor? That is not the turning point for the Dark Side growing in strength. By the beginning of Phantom Menace, the Council is already wary of the darkness in the Force. Palpatine’s election happens in the middle of that development, not as a clear turning point. There is no reason to draw a causal conclusion there; in fact, doing so would be profoundly poor reasoning.

I think it’s easy to go “but he’s so OBVIOUSLY EVIL” but that’s also a…really lazy take. The fact that Palpatine is evil is obvious to us, the audience. The prequels are PREQUELS, they assume that everyone watching them has at least seen enough of the OT to know that Senator Palpatine and Emperor Palpatine are, you know, the same fucking person. So the PT doesn’t waste our time or insult our intelligence by trying to be coy. “Palpatine was a Sith the WHOLE TIME!!!!” is not a twist. Trying to make it a twist would have been obnoxious. WE know he’s evil–but whenever he interacts with normal people, if you watch it without the whiny fanboy attitude of “UGH can’t they see he’s EVIL”

Palpatine’s harmless-old-man act is really, really good. Of course it’s fake, and it’s easy to think that’s obvious because, again, we know better. But when you remember that this guy has been a public figure for decades, has never visibly done anything outside the ordinary in that time, and is behaving exactly as one would expect a normal politician to behave…no, it’s not. It’s not obvious. It wouldn’t be obvious.

So can we stop with this? I swear to god y’all have never heard of dramatic irony in your damn lives.

D&D Stats in Simple Language

By MssngrDeath:

I’ve heard a lot of interpretations of ability scores. 

The most common of these is “Charisma correlates strongly to good looks”, which is incorrect and tends to irritate players of low-Charisma characters, but anytime there’s something the stats don’t cover explicitly (like weight and build), we try to draw conclusions about them based on the hard numbers we have. 

The problem is that this still leave a lot to interpretation. 

What’s the actual strength difference between a person who can lift 80 pounds and a person who can lift 100 pounds? 

How tough is a bard with Constitution of 14, really? 

What does it mean for my character when I roll poorly and have to drive the 3-Charisma barbarian?

I put together this list a few years ago to try to put this in simple language. 

Below are some quick descriptions of every stat, from 1 (a modifier of -5, or as low as a character can get without being undead or a construct) to 25 (a modifier of +7, or as high as a PHB character can get without magic):

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