drawing on lined paper

Note taking tips

Notebook for each class. 

Have a separate notebook for each class. It keeps things organized. Plus, if you keep all of your classes’ notes in the same notebook and you lose that notebook, you’re pretty much SOL. Write clearly. If you’re going to handwrite your notes, make sure you can read them later. PenMANship. It’s got the word “man” in it, so it’s manly. Let go of perfectionism The purpose of note-taking is simple: to help you study better and more quickly. First, what’s new to you? There’s no point in writing down facts you already know. If you already know the Declaration of Independence was written and signed in 1776, there’s no reason to write that down. Anything you know you know you can leave out of your notes. Second, what’s relevant? What information is most likely to be of use later, whether on a test, in an essay, or in completing a project? Focus on points that directly relate to or illustrate your reading (which means you’ll have to have actually done the reading…). The kinds of information to pay special attention to are: 

* Dates of events: Dates allow you to 

  • a) create a chronology, putting things in order according to when they happened, and
  • b) understand the context of an event. For instance, knowing Isaac Newton was born in 1643 allows you to situate his work in relation to that of other physicists who came before and after him, as well as in relation to other trends of the 17th century.

 * Names of people: Being able to associate names with key ideas also helps remember ideas better and, when names come up again, to recognize ties between different ideas whether proposed by the same individuals or by people related in some way.

 * Theories: Any statement of a theory should be recorded — theories are the main points of most classes. 

* Definitions: Like theories, these are the main points and, unless you are positive you already know the definition of a term, should be written down. Keep in mind that many fields use everyday words in ways that are unfamiliar to us. 

 * Arguments and debates: Any list of pros and cons, any critique of a key idea, both sides of any debate related in class or your reading should be recorded. This is the stuff that advancement in every discipline emerges from, and will help you understand both how ideas have changed (and why) but also the process of thought and development within the particular discipline you are studying. 

* Images and exercises: Whenever an image is used to illustrate a point, or when an in-class exercise is performed, a few words are in order to record the experience. Obviously it’s overkill to describe every tiny detail, but a short description of a painting or a short statement about what the class did should be enough to remind you and help reconstruct the experience. 

 * Other stuff: Just about anything a professor writes on a board should probably be written down, unless it’s either self-evident or something you already know. Titles of books, movies, TV series, and other media are usually useful, though they may be irrelevant to the topic at hand; I usually put this sort of stuff in the margin to look up later (it’s often useful for research papers, for example). Pay attention to other student’s comments, too — try to capture at least the gist of comments that add to your understanding. 

* Your own questions: Make sure to record your own questions about the material as they occur to you. This will help you remember to ask the professor or look something up later, as well as prompt you to think through the gaps in your understanding. 

* Note-Taking Techniques: You don’t have to be super-fancy in your note-taking to be effective, but there are a few techniques that seem to work best for most people.

* Outlining: Whether you use Roman numerals or bullet points, outlining is an effective way to capture the hierarchical relationships between ideas and data. In a history class, you might write the name of an important leader, and under it the key events that he or she was involved in. Under each of them, a short description. And so on. Outlining is a great way to take notes from books, because the author has usually organized the material in a fairly effective way, and you can go from start to end of a chapter and simply reproduce that structure in your notes.For lectures, however, outlining has limitations. The relationship between ideas isn’t always hierarchical, and the instructor might jump around a lot. A point later in the lecture might relate better to information earlier in the lecture, leaving you to either 

  • a) flip back and forth to find where the information goes best (and hope there’s still room to write it in) 
  • b) risk losing the relationship between what the professor just said and what she said before. 
 

* Mind-mapping: For lectures, a mind-map might be a more appropriate way of keeping track of the relationships between ideas. Here’s the idea: in the center of a blank sheet of paper, you write the lecture’s main topic. As new sub-topics are introduced (the kind of thing you’d create a new heading for in an outline), you draw a branch outward from the center and write the sub-topic along the branch. Then each point under that heading gets its own, smaller branch off the main one. When another new sub-topic is mentioned, you draw a new main branch from the center. And so on. The thing is, if a point should go under the first heading but you’re on the fourth heading, you can easily just draw it in on the first branch. Likewise, if a point connects to two different ideas, you can connect it to two different branches. If you want to neaten things up later, you can re-draw the map or type it up 

 * The Cornell System: The Cornell System is a simple but powerful system for increasing your recall and the usefulness of your notes. About a quarter of the way from the bottom of a sheet of paper, draw a line across the width of the page. Draw another line from that line to the top, about 2 inches (5 cm) from the right-hand edge of the sheet. You’ve divided your page into three sections. In the largest section, you take notes normally — you can outline or mind-map or whatever. After the lecture, write a series of “cues” into the skinny column on the right, questions about the material you’ve just taken notes on. This will help you process the information from the lecture or reading, as well as providing a handy study tool when exams come along: simply cover the main section and try to answer the questions. In the bottom section, you write a short, 2-3 line summary in your own words of the material you’ve covered. Again, this helps you process the information by forcing you to use it in a new way; it also provides a useful reference when you’re trying to find something in your notes later. Charting Method If your professor’s lecture will be focused on comparing and contrasting two or more ideas, you might consider using the charting method. Create a table in the note-taking program you’re using. Make as many columns as there are categories that you’re comparing and contrasting. Label each column with a category. As you listen to the lecture, record the notes under the appropriate category.

all the members of Vox Machina stacked on top of each other? yes 🅱lease

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Ideas for Witchcraft Using Art

[REPOSTED FROM OLD URL]

A compilation of ideas I have read or thought up! I do not claim originality for this post. Some ideas crossover between fields and are not repeated.

Two-Dimensional

  • Program your drawing tools with intent - for lighter/darker lines, for clarity of the stroke, for following through with the motion, for consistency.
  • Draw sigils on your drawing board or easel or table for inspiration.
  • (And if you’re using a flat table to draw, consider getting a drawing board. Drawing large on a flat surface distorts your POV.)
  • Energize your brush water for better removal of paint.
  • Draw a sigil on your palette or mirror/glass for paint to keep your paints moist for longer.
  • Use a clothes pin (for pink rubber erasers) or a 2B/light graphite pencil (for the kneadable erasers) to draw sigils for better removal of lines.
  • Enchant all your tools - brushes, paper pads, canvases, pencil cases, anything - for durability.
  • Program a stone (of your choice) to prevent loss of your tools and keep it in your backpack, pencil pouch, or portfolio bag.
  • Draw sigils on the back of your finished works for extra attention.
  • Sacrifice the first tip of your pencils and charcoal (both light and dark and especially anything past 6B) to a jar, and put a spell on the jar to keep your light lines light and your dark lines dark.
  • If you use a ruler or a stick to check proportions, dip it in enchanted water the night before - enchant the water to give you clarity of vision.
  • Optional: Enchant your clothes to repel paint stains, charcoal dust, pastel sticks, etc. (Optional because unless you’re Yves Klein, most artists I am familiar with are careful not to get excessively dirty because of wasted materials.)
  • Keep your paints/color-tools in a container enchanted to maintain their vibrancy.
  • Draw a sigil on any face-mask you have so that it filters all hazardous fumes out, especially if you are using spray paint.
  • Enchant spray paint cans for less dripping, as well as fixative cans.

Three-Dimensional

  • Enchant any and all materials and projects for durability, especially after welding, gluing, slipping, or firing a project.
  • Use chalk to draw a sigil on welding or plasma cutter surfaces for clean lines and careful motions.
  • Enchant any material used to bind objects together or secure objects with power and specific purpose (ex. glue to bind these two pieces of wood together, straps to bind these several pieces of plaster mold together).
  • Use magic to make a specific place where you rest your work (a table, a board, a section of floor) so that while you are away it is protected and safe.
  • Enchant all your small tools so that they are returned to you if lost. (Also sharpie your name all over those things. Do it.)
  • If you have access to YOUR OWN power tools, put a sigil for sharpness and durability on any saw blades. Do not do this if you are at a school using public equipment - you may not be allowed to draw on blades or remove them from the machines to draw on.
  • Siphon any frustration or anger as energy into hammers for extra force.
  • Invent a small chant to increase precision and say it before drilling, cutting, or altering anything.
  • Write sigils for protection, durability, and good color on paper and leave them in the kilns with your art work during firing. (For ceramics and hardening metal casting sand-resin molds. Wouldn’t advise it for glass kilns due to potential contamination by ash in small glass kilns.)
  • Enchant the hell out of your workspace for cleanliness, organization, and loss-prevention. Do this like everyday, I swear. I know sculptors. DO IT NOW.

Textiles/Printmaking

  • Sharpness enchantments on every single blade in your work area.
  • Draw durability and precision sigils on any sewing equipment used.
  • Enchant water for color-vibrancy and attention and use it to anoint all fabric lengths (usually best while they are still rolled up or immediately after purchasing them).
  • Energize paper reams with color-vibrancy and attention rather than using water.
  • Cast spells on all inks for good consistency and ease of use.
  • Enchant ink-mixing area for cleanliness and lack of contamination.
  • Likewise, enchant cleaning supplies (mineral oils, etc) for extra power while cleaning.
  • Say a protective chant over your pieces while they are drying to prevent damage.
  • Sigil the back of your stamps (and the printmaking word for the ‘stamps’ you use, I forgot) for durability.
  • Visualize your paper/fabric as imbibed with energy of fire for faster drying times.
  • Enchant thread for strength, enchant needle for sharpness, enchant any backing for protection.  

Digital/Photography

  • Cast spells all over your electronics for protection, battery life, memory space, anything you can think of.
  • If you use a tablet, clean it (carefully) and while doing that visualize your intent for the tablet to provide you with clean lines while drawing.
  • Draw a sigil on your workspace to remind you to save, frequently, often, and with more than one file name during a big project.
  • Enchant your external hard drives and USB sticks with loss prevention spells.
  • Draw a sigil for attention on the background of your digital file before starting a project, erase it for the sigil to activate or leave it hidden in the background for permanence.
  • Turn your digital signature into an enchantment for protection, attention, or theft-prevention.
  • Draw a sigil lightly on the reverse of any photographs printed for protection, attention, or theft prevention.
  • Hold camera lenses up to the sun for good lighting and angles and to the moon for clarity and cleanliness of your lens.
  • Ritualize cleaning of equipment to imbibe materials with specific attributes.

Performance

  • Enchant water pre-performance for strength, focus, and energy.
  • Draw sigils for attention on your body underneath your clothes (if you are the performer) or on the focus of your art.
  • Enchant digital or recorded files of your performance for protection (from loss due to accidental trashing) and for locating it later.
  • Sorry I don’t know much about performance, but call upon the spirits of Carol Schneeman and Joseph Beuys and I bet they’d help. (Schneeman’s still living but summon her anyways.)

General

  • Enchant your coffee, tea, or drink of choice for clarity during critiques and focus during those same critiques.
  • Put sigils on your clothes to decrease anxiety and stress, put sigils on your clothes to prevent damage to yourself or to your clothes.
  • Invent a chant to increase retention while studying for Art History.
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SKETCHY BEHAVIORS | Heather Benjamin (RH)

Through her dense and detailed packed line drawings to her more focused ink brush pieces, Rhode Island based artist Heather Benjamin’s work is visceral, cathartic, and autobiographical. It offers a completely unapologetic and unflinching look into an artists’ own struggles with life, body image, self confidence, and sexuality.  We find her and her art to be inspirational, honest and badass.

We recently ran into Heather at her booth at the LA Art Book Fair and caught up with her a few months later to ask about her art, her experiences at RISD, her influences, and her thoughts about her work and her life. 

Photographs courtesy of the artist.

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HAPPY LUNAR NEW YEAR 2017 

So it’s 1/1 New Year’s Eve according to the Lunar calendar, and since here at my place it’s kind of a big thing, here’s Sefikura wearing Vietnamese aodai LOL.

Btw, I just saw a post saying it’s the year of the Chocobo (aka year of the Chicken lol) but then you can say that it’s the year of the Cloud ahahaha.

anonymous asked:

Imagine finals week. All of the children have reached "stupid tired" levels. Michael and Jeremy both passed out at a library table on opposite sides. Michael's using his arm as a pillow, outstretched, pacman exposed to the world. Pacman just happens to be pointed towards Jeremy so some dweebs (Christine and Jake) snag some notebook paper and draw a line of dots across the table leading to him, and on the final sheet there's a drawing of a cherry, lightly placed on his sleeping head.

tHATS…CUTE….

10 drawing prompts to help you sketch outside the box.

1) Self portrait:  In a mirror with a washable pen, trace the lines of your face (on your face), or of one particular part (an eye, your mouth, etc.) Take note of things that you discover: the placement of under-eye bags, the curves in your nose, the line of your jaw. Recreate the line-art on paper. 

2) Poses and Posture: Draw stick figures in a variety of positions- dancing, jumping, leaning backwards, sitting forwards, etc. gradually fill in the bodies of these figures using a wooden model or online guide. It’s helpful to draw a line down the centre of your figures that runs through the nose, sternum, and pelvis. If your figure is twisted or bent, the line should be too. 

3) Doodle: Draw the silhouette of something you’re good at drawing. Then, draw the biggest circle that you can without going outside the lines of that silhouette. In the remaining space around the circle, draw the biggest circles that you can. Attempt to fill the entire space with circles. Each new circle creates room for several smaller ones, and eventually you will have spaces that are too small for new circles ( using a fineliner will reduce but not eliminate this problem). If you like, colour in the circles and spaces according to the coloration of the thing you drew the silhouette of. 

4) Creativity: Using an online guide, make a rough sketch of the proportions of a human face. Include lines for the nose, mouth, eyes, ears, and eyebrows. Then, instead of drawing a human face, try to draw one as alien as possible while still following the proportions you have sketched. Pay attention to shading and details such as eyelashes, lip-wrinkles, and facial blemishes. 

5) Hands: Go through a few magazines and cut out pictures of hands in as many different positions as possible to glue into your sketchbook. Using a pencil or erasable pen, trace over the key features of each hand. Pay close attention to the width of the hand, the length, and its connection to the wrist. Try to recreate these hands beside the pictures. Don’t focus on detail, instead, focus on making the position of the hand look as natural and fluid as possible.  

6) Perspective: with a pencil, draw a large square with a dot in the centre. Draw lines between the corners of the square, crossing over the dot in the centre. Attempt to draw the room you are sitting in by first drawing the largest objects, and later filling in details. Use the lines as guidelines for perspective: things closer to the dot will be further away, things closer to the edges of the square will be closest to you. An object that starts close and gets further away will seem like it is being ‘pulled’ into the centre by the dot, and will have lines of the same angles as those you have drawn. 

7) Animals: If you have a pet, try to sketch it as quickly as possible. Focus on forms and shapes, not on detail. When it moves, sketch its new position over top of the old one. If it moves to the right, sketch it again to the right. Allow your sketches to overlap. If you do not have a pet, this would be a great excuse to watch cute cat videos on youtube. 

8) Memory: It’s dangerous to rely on memory when drawing, especially if you haven’t trained your memory to recall forms and shapes before details. Generally, what we remember most about a scene is what we see as the most unusual. This is why some people are good at drawing eyes, but unable to draw the rest of the face. For this exercise, find a photograph you like in a magazine or newspaper, and give yourself 30 seconds to study it. Try to see shapes, not objects. Instead of seeing a cup, remember the shape of the cup and its position relevant to other objects. Then, try recreate the photograph from memory. This may take several tries, don’t be afraid to ‘cheat’ if you get stuck. 

9) Abstract: allow yourself to be filled with a specific emotion. Focus on that emotion, think about how it feels, the physical effect it has on your body. Try to draw that emotion coming out of you. It may be helpful to start by drawing a self-portrait of your facial expression while feeling the emotion, and letting yourself get carried away as you draw the components of your face that are most altered by that expression. Don’t try to preserve the first things you sketch, let them be covered and obscured as you add more details. 

10) Practice: It’s always good to practice drawing objects, I find it most helpful to draw from photographs. Dedicate a page in your book to drawing objects that you feel represent you, or are otherwise close to your heart/ identity. Like music? Try drawing piano keys. Like fashion? Draw a few of your outfits draped over the bed. Try to fill the page with these drawings, making use of every inch of space available.