dramatic characters

anonymous asked:

It's perfectly possible for Rey to end up single. And I'm pretty sure that's the case, as FinnRose seems to be the romance of this trilogy, not Reylo.

My personal opinion is that whatever happens between Rey and Kylo will be ‘so much bigger’ (quoting Luke from the trailer) and much more complex than them simply falling in love and flying off into the sunset on the Millenium Falcon.
Given what we know about what might go down on Ach To, it seems like Rey and Kylo might fit into the ‘Adam and Eve’ archetypes as they seem to be expanding knowledge of Force lore and ‘upgrading’ the idea of the Jedi. Finnrose feels like a traditional type of romance that could bring some lightheartedness to an otherwise seemingly 'dark’ movie. Reylo is dramatic, complicated and both characters have massive obstacles to overcome but that doesn’t mean it won’t and can’t happen. It’s just a different kind of story. I think the resolving of the conflict between Rey and Kylo Ren and their union will be symbolic of the Force balancing itself out as they are both embodying the dark and light sides of the Force, so it’s already something very different from Finnrose.

tbh zuko in his Prince Zuko™ phase was the most dramatic character in the history of fiction, i mean he just went on ridiculous rants and speeches constantly. they seemed so well prepared too, like did he practice?? who remembers when he shrieked and sobbed at lightning?? who remembers when he decided to rant about his feelings to aang while aang was literally in the spirit world and physically incapable of hearing him?? who remembers when iroh was like “calm down my guy” and he screamed “I’M COMPLETELY CALM” then set his room on fire?? he’s so unsubtle, not a lick of slyness in his body, he literally told everyone about his daddy problems constantly it was unbearable 

dungeons and dragons is a versatile game where you can give your character a dramatic backstory, or a tragic and heroic backstory, or just an overall fantastical backstory, and clint mcelroy instead decided ‘my character is a deadbeat dad’. i fucking love that choice? a world of opportunity is available to you and instead he said ‘no my character is just a bad father’ like… it’s Real As Hell. i love it. i love merle

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Throwback to that time James made Aleks laugh so hard he fucked up his progress

On trauma aftermaths that don't advance the plot

The way TV shows trauma can lead people to expect every reference to trauma to be a plot point. This can be isolating to people coping with the aftermaths of trauma. Sometimes people treat us as stories rather than as people. Sometimes, instead of listening to us, they put a lot of pressure on us to advance the plot they’re expecting.

On TV, triggers tend to be full audiovisual flashbacks that add something to the story. You see a vivid window into the character’s past, and something changes. On TV, trauma aftermaths are usually fascinating. Real life trauma aftermaths are sometimes interesting, but also tend to be very boring to live with.

On TV, triggers tend to create insight. In real life, they’re often boring intrusions interfering with the things you’d rather be thinking about. Sometimes knowing darn well where they come from doesn’t make them go away. Sometimes it’s more like: Seriously? This again?

On TV, when trauma is mentioned, it’s usually a dramatic plot point that happens in a moment. In real life, trauma aftermaths are a mundane day-to-day reality that people live with. They’re a fact of life — and not necessarily the most important one at all times. People who have experienced trauma do other things too. They’re important, but not the one and only defining characteristic of who someone is. And things that happened stay important even when you’re ok. Recovery is not a reset. Mentioning the past doesn’t necessarily mean you’re in crisis.

On TV, when a character mentions trauma, or gets triggered in front of someone, it’s usually a dramatic moment. It changes their life, or their relationship with another character, or explains their backstory, or something. In real life, being triggered isn’t always a story, and telling isn’t always a turning point. Sometimes it’s just mentioning something that happened to be relevant. Sometimes it’s just a mundane instance of something that happens from time to time.

Most people can’t have a dramatic transformative experience every time it turns out that their trauma matters. Transformative experiences and moments of revelation exist, but they’re not the end all and be all of trauma aftermaths. Life goes on, and other things matter too. And understanding what a reaction means and where it came from doesn’t always make it go away. Sometimes, it takes longer and has more to do with skill-building than introspection. Sometimes it doesn’t go away.

On a day to day level, it’s often better to be matter-of-fact about aftermaths. It can be exhausting when people see you as a story and expect you to advance the plot whenever they notice some effect of trauma. Pressure to perform narratives about healing doesn’t often help people to make their lives better. Effect support involves respecting someone as a complex human, including the boring parts.

The aftermath of trauma is a day-to-day reality. It affects a lot of things, large and small. It can be things like being too tired to focus well in class because nightmares kept waking you up every night this week. TV wants that to be a dramatic moment where the character faces their past and gets better. In real life, it’s often a day where you just do your best to try and learn algebra anyway. Because survivors do things besides be traumatized and think about trauma. Sometimes it’s not a story. Sometimes it’s just getting through another day as well as possible.

A lot of triggers are things like being unable to concentrate on anything interesting because some kinds of background noises make you feel too unsafe to pay attention to anything else. For the zillionth time.  Even though you know rationally that they’re not dangerous. Even though you know where they come from, and have processed it over and over. Even if you’ve made a lot of progress in dealing with them, even if they’re no longer bothersome all the time. For most people, recovery involves a lot more than insight. The backstory might be interesting, but being tired and unable to concentrate is boring.

Triggers can also mean having to leave an event and walk home by yourself while other people are having fun, because it turns out that it hurts too much to be around pies and cakes. Or having trouble finding anything interesting to read that isn’t intolerably triggering. Or having trouble interacting with new people because you’re too scared or there are too many minefields. Or being so hypervigilant that it’s hard to focus on anything. No matter how interesting the backstory is, feeling disconnected and missing out on things you wanted to enjoy is usually boring.

When others want to see your trauma as a story, their expectations sometimes expand to fill all available space. Sometimes they seem to want everything to be therapy, or want everything to be about trauma and recovery.

When others want every reference to trauma to be the opening to a transformative experience, it can be really hard to talk about accommodations. For instance, it gets hard to say things like:

  • “I’m really tired because of nightmares” or 
  • “I would love to go to that event, but I might need to leave because of the ways in which that kind of thing can be triggering” or 
  • “I’m glad I came, but I can’t handle this right now” or
  • “I’m freaking out now, but I’ll be ok in a few minutes” or 
  • “I need to step out — can you text me when they stop playing this movie?”

It can also be hard to mention relevant experiences. There are a lot of reasons to mention experiences other than wanting to process, eg:

  • “Actually, I have experience dealing with that agency”
  • “That’s not what happens when people go to the police, in my experience, what happens when you need to make a police report is…”
  • “Please keep in mind that this isn’t hypothetical for me, and may not be for others in the room as well.”

Or any number of other things.

When people are expecting a certain kind of story, they sometimes look past the actual person. And when everyone is looking past you in search of a story, it can be very hard to make connections.

It helps to realize that no matter what others think, your story belongs to you. You don’t have to play out other people’s narrative expectations. It’s ok if your story isn’t what others want it to be. It’s ok not to be interesting. It’s ok to have trauma reactions that don’t advance the plot. And there are people who understand that, and even more people who can learn to understand that.

It’s possible to live a good life in the aftermath of trauma. It’s possible to relearn how to be interested in things. It’s possible to build space you can function in, and to build up your ability to function in more spaces. It’s often possible to get over triggers. All of this can take a lot of time and work, and can be a slow process. It doesn’t always make for a good story, and it doesn’t always play out the way others would like it to. And, it’s your own personal private business. Other people’s concern or curiosity does not obligate you to share details.

Survivors and victims have the right to be boring. We have the right to deal with trauma aftermaths in a matter-of-fact way, without indulging other people’s desires for plot twists. We have the right to own our own stories, and to keep things private. We have the right to have things in our lives that are not therapy; we have the right to needed accommodations without detailing what happened and what recovery looks like. Neither traumatic experiences nor trauma aftermaths erase our humanity.

We are not stories, and we have no obligation to advance an expected plot. We are people, and we have the right to be treated as people. Our lives, and our stories, are our own.

anonymous asked:

Hi ! After knowing harry's meaning of SOTT what do you think of it? Honestly that's not what i was thinking... like i never thought it would be a perspective of a mother dying. all the interpretations everyone's made idk harry is so difficult to read what are your thoughts?

Lol!

The Rolling Stone/ Cameron Crowe interview was quite a nice bit of theater this morning, wasn’t it?

On the one hand, we have Harry state in radio promo interview that SOTT was his most literal and personal song on the album. On the other hand, he offers an interpretation of a mother dying in childbirth and urging her child forward. He paints quite a dramatic tableau– but if it’s personal/ literal, which one was Harry? The mom? Or the child?

Was the dying mother the one shouting, “We’ve got to–away”? Because she, this dramatic character, wasn’t going to make it. Or was it the baby talking to– the neonatal intensive care unit staff?

Then we have contradicting versions of how the song was written. A prior interview had said Harry sat down at a piano, thrummed out some chords in the rented Jamaica house that ended up being the opening of the song.

The Rolling Stones interview says, “The song began as a seven-minute voice note on Styles’ phone, and ended up as a sweeping piano ballade.”

So which one was it? A spontaneous improvisation on a Jamaican piano, or a voice note?

I think the clue to these contradiction lies in the one true thing Harry said:

“Like, fuck, I don’t know what Prince eats for breakfast. That mystery … it’s just what I like.”

I was talking to @lawyerlarrie about the French deconstructionists, Foucault and Derrida. Deconstructionism is a movement of literary criticism which focuses on literary texts to the exclusion of authorial intent. “Pride and Prejudice” means something because of the words (the text) themselves, not because of what Jane Austen wanted them to mean. In this school, it doesn’t really matter what Austen wanted. What we have is the text.

Similarly, when songs are written, they acquire an existence of their own, regardless of what the songwriter wants them to mean.

You can carry this to an absurd end, of course. Other ways of interpreting are valid, including a psychosocial reading connecting the song to a songwriter’s biography. For example, we now know that Stevie Nicks wrote “Sara” about her abortion of the baby she conceived with Don Henley. That fact is relevant to the song, no matter what the literary interpretation is.

SOTT’s lyrics describe separation and oppression; a promised end that never comes; a relationship in which one person has been given reprieve/ freedom while the other person is left behind. It is about false reassurances, about someone giving comfort despite knowing that a situation is hopeless. It’s a song about an impossible escape. And about the guilt of the person (the singer) who has been given the freedom. The cost of his freedom was pain to the person he loves. That meaning is unarguable.

These words have meaning, no matter what the writers want them to mean. A mother dying is one way to express this situation. But a mother dying is a metaphoric representation of the situation. In other words, it can’t be literal– not for Harry. The literal meaning is hidden. Harry didn’t say it; he didn’t want to say it.

So much is left unsaid or obfuscated in this interview. I (with some discomfort) admire Harry the Escape Artist. He has left just a smoky outline of himself on the page. There’s an irony in his honesty. “I’m honest because I’ve told no lies”; this isn’t the same as “I’m honest because I’m telling the truth.”

We say he’s “swerving,” but I don’t think that’s a great description either.

I think the whole solo promo has been about creating another theatrical persona for Harry– one who is a hip, down-to-earth, creative, sweet, genuine, charming, HONEST musician who doesn’t get many dates, and whose heart is broken over and over by intense (heterosexual) love affairs, which are then converted to art. And who, finally, gets to do exactly what he wants– so it’s all above ground and transparent, right?

Wrong. It’s all illusory.

Harry has created an iron curtain between his public and private lives, which no one but family are privy to. I’m not just talking about his sexuality, but the whole question of his privacy. The iron curtain deflects peskier personal questions and allows him to work. It separates his celebrity status from his artistic achievements. Not that he’s above using celebrity to promote his art– why else would he do the interview? Of course he’s going to use his celebrity when the occasion arises. But he’s treading a thin line.

The iron curtain lets him swim in the private cove of his Jamaican imagination without being under public scrutiny.

The ocean doesn’t care who he is. It doesn’t care whether he was in love with Taylor Swift. It is big enough for him to disappear in.

So if his whole album is filled with love songs dedicated to female pronouns, so be it. He has raised the wall.

“The mystery … it’s just what I like.”

People who call Snape a “hypocrite” for being derisive of Tonks’s changed patronus could really use a refresher of basic human psychology.

I just saw Logan in theaters.

Somebody hold me.

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save him. 

thegaywasian  asked:

who would be the muses in your otayuri hercules au??

Okay let me explain.

I totally see Chris as the leading muse, cause Chris is amazing and I am sure he has a beautiful voice. Than we have Georgi’s dramatic and Emil’s sunny character who would also fit for the muses.

And Kenjiou is the biggest fan and probably sings the whole day how awesome yuuri is (if they don’t sing about Otabek)

And Michele is suspicious. He’s here because of Emil. 

It’s About Time You Wrote Me Another Poem:

A Short Story

“It’s about time you wrote me another poem,” she said, sitting on her swing, watching the sunrise.

I glanced up from my evening stars. “Oh yeah. Why’s that?”

“Because it’s been too long since you wrote me the last one.” She takes a sip of hot tea - not the watery kind of tea but the rich kind, made of milk and fresh spices (she doesn’t know what kind of spices. Don’t ask her. It’s “just plants and stuff”). 

I fold the stars neatly and place them on the nightstand. “Alright, what would you like the poem to be about?”

She stares at the sky. Moments pass as the clouds turn peach. “You know, I’ve learned something.”

“What’s that?”

“I learned it from you.” She has another sip of tea as she swallows she adds, “You learned it from me.” Her dots wave across the coffee beans (I don’t know why there are coffee beans. Maybe it’s the closest image she could find to her favorite tea). “I learned that two people can grow up in different worlds - different cultures  -  and still be people who’ve known each other for ages.”

“Yeah?” There is a microscopic prick in my eye.

“I’ve learned that it’s okay to love your friends.”

I blink rapidly, trying to rid myself of this sudden sensation on either side of the bridge of my nose. “I think you wrote your own poem.” I press against my tear ducts with the tips of my fingers. “Would you like me to type it up and post it for you?”

She rolls her big eyes, and I can see her them now. They rest below her matted hair. The world around me is rocking smoothly, soothingly back and forth, and I hear her laugh lightly - just once. The air smells of those unknown plants in her milky drink.

“I may never be able to meet you.” She frowns into her cooling tea. “But I found you in all the world, and I wouldn’t change a thing.”

“I’m here,” I say, and she looks up at me. “Just like in your dream.”

She turns back to the horizon - as if it’s not unusual for me to be there, rocking on that swing with her. She takes another sip of her tea, and we both watch the same sunrise.

“THE END,” I write.

She rolls her eyes. “That’s how you are going to end it?”

We both laugh at her remark, and now it’s like her dream.

“Get some sleep.” She lays her teacup in her lap as my head hits the pillow in my darkened room. “You are getting weird,” she says, and, this time, her words are black letters on a coffee-bean screen.

Inspired by a conversation with @untold-stories-here