drama class

things people in my drama class have said

•"I’m not wasting data on Dora"

•"This meme is for your toenails joe"

•"Summon your inner volleyball"

•"Nikki call me an orange"

‘You’re an orange’

“I am not an orange I am a human being”

•"Sam, please, it’s been a bad weekend I need my crouton"

•"Look in your clock, what’s inside?……..
Systemic oppression"

•"You don’t eat roadkill, you southerner"

'But we’re in Georgia’

•"I get to be the narrator!! *runs out in the middle of class*

•"My sword hand HUNGERS for plot development!“

•"What’s in your mouth? Oh. It’s a couch. Well.”

•"I super duper quintuple dog dare you. I dog dare you so much the word dog has lost meaning. My soul is broken.“

•"Guess what I brought? Freaking veggie chips that’s what I brought.”

•"Is that a communism?! No it’s a heart “

•"Spank me naughty and call me chilis”

•"My dentist made me a meme"

•"Well call me an apple and realize that you’re being an ignoramus in doing so!“

Rick Riordan won a Stonewall award today

for his second Magnus Chase book, due to the inclusion of the character Alex Fierro who is gender fluid. This was the speech he gave, and it really distills why I love this author and his works so much, and why I will always recommend his works to anyone and everyone.

“Thank you for inviting me here today. As I told the Stonewall Award Committee, this is an honor both humbling and unexpected.

So, what is an old cis straight white male doing up here? Where did I get the nerve to write Alex Fierro, a transgender, gender fluid child of Loki in The Hammer of Thor, and why should I get cookies for that?

These are all fair and valid questions, which I have been asking myself a lot.

I think, to support young LGBTQ readers, the most important thing publishing can do is to publish and promote more stories by LGBTQ authors, authentic experiences by authentic voices. We have to keep pushing for this. The Stonewall committee’s work is a critical part of that effort. I can only accept the Stonewall Award in the sense that I accept a call to action – firstly, to do more myself to read and promote books by LGBTQ authors.

But also, it’s a call to do better in my own writing. As one of my genderqueer readers told me recently, “Hey, thanks for Alex. You didn’t do a terrible job!” I thought: Yes! Not doing a terrible job was my goal!

As important as it is to offer authentic voices and empower authors and role models from within LGBTQ community, it’s is also important that LGBTQ kids see themselves reflected and valued in the larger world of mass media, including my books. I know this because my non-heteronormative readers tell me so. They actively lobby to see characters like themselves in my books. They like the universe I’ve created. They want to be part of it. They deserve that opportunity. It’s important that I, as a mainstream author, say, “I see you. You matter. Your life experience may not be like mine, but it is no less valid and no less real. I will do whatever I can to understand and accurately include you in my stories, in my world. I will not erase you.”

People all over the political spectrum often ask me, “Why can’t you just stay silent on these issues? Just don’t include LGBTQ material and everybody will be happy.” This assumes that silence is the natural neutral position. But silence is not neutral. It’s an active choice. Silence is great when you are listening. Silence is not so great when you are using it to ignore or exclude.

But that’s all macro, ‘big picture’ stuff. Yes, I think the principles are important. Yes, in the abstract, I feel an obligation to write the world as I see it: beautiful because of its variations. Where I can’t draw on personal experience, I listen, I read a lot – in particular I want to credit Beyond Magenta and Gender Outlaws for helping me understand more about the perspective of my character Alex Fierro – and I trust that much of the human experience is universal. You can’t go too far wrong if you use empathy as your lens. But the reason I wrote Alex Fierro, or Nico di Angelo, or any of my characters, is much more personal.

I was a teacher for many years, in public and private school, California and Texas. During those years, I taught all kinds of kids. I want them all to know that I see them. They matter. I write characters to honor my students, and to make up for what I wished I could have done for them in the classroom.

I think about my former student Adrian (a pseudonym), back in the 90s in San Francisco. Adrian used the pronouns he and him, so I will call him that, but I suspect Adrian might have had more freedom and more options as to how he self-identified in school were he growing up today. His peers, his teachers, his family all understood that Adrian was female, despite his birth designation. Since kindergarten, he had self-selected to be among the girls – socially, athletically, academically. He was one of our girls. And although he got support and acceptance at the school, I don’t know that I helped him as much as I could, or that I tried to understand his needs and his journey. At that time in my life, I didn’t have the experience, the vocabulary, or frankly the emotional capacity to have that conversation. When we broke into social skills groups, for instance, boys apart from girls, he came into my group with the boys, I think because he felt it was required, but I feel like I missed the opportunity to sit with him and ask him what he wanted. And to assure him it was okay, whichever choice he made. I learned more from Adrian than I taught him. Twenty years later, Alex Fierro is for Adrian.

I think about Jane (pseudonym), another one of my students who was a straight cis-female with two fantastic moms. Again, for LGBTQ families, San Francisco was a pretty good place to live in the 90s, but as we know, prejudice has no geographical border. You cannot build a wall high enough to keep it out. I know Jane got flack about her family. I did what I could to support her, but I don’t think I did enough. I remember the day Jane’s drama class was happening in my classroom. The teacher was new – our first African American male teacher, which we were all really excited about – and this was only his third week. I was sitting at my desk, grading papers, while the teacher did a free association exercise. One of his examples was ‘fruit – gay.’ I think he did it because he thought it would be funny to middle schoolers. After the class, I asked to see the teacher one on one. I asked him to be aware of what he was saying and how that might be hurtful. I know. Me, a white guy, lecturing this Black teacher about hurtful words. He got defensive and quit, because he said he could not promise to not use that language again. At the time, I felt like I needed to do something, to stand up especially for Jane and her family. But did I make things better handling it as I did? I think I missed an opportunity to open a dialogue about how different people experience hurtful labels. Emmie and Josephine and their daughter Georgina, the family I introduce in The Dark Prophecy, are for Jane.

I think about Amy, and Mark, and Nicholas … All former students who have come out as gay since I taught them in middle school. All have gone on to have successful careers and happy families. When I taught them, I knew they were different. Their struggles were greater, their perspectives more divergent than some of my other students. I tried to provide a safe space for them, to model respect, but in retrospect I don’t think I supported them as well as I could have, or reached out as much as they might have needed. I was too busy preparing lessons on Shakespeare or adjectives, and not focusing enough on my students’ emotional health. Adjectives were a lot easier for me to reconcile than feelings. Would they have felt comfortable coming out earlier than college or high school if they had found more support in middle school? Would they have wanted to? I don’t know. But I don’t think they felt it was a safe option, which leaves me thinking that I did not do enough for them at that critical middle school time. I do not want any kid to feel alone, invisible, misunderstood. Nico di Angelo is for Amy, and Mark and Nicholas.

I am trying to do more. Percy Jackson started as a way to empower kids, in particular my son, who had learning differences. As my platform grew, I felt obliged to use it to empower all kids who are struggling through middle school for whatever reason. I don’t always do enough. I don’t always get it right. Good intentions are wonderful things, but at the end of a manuscript, the text has to stand on its own. What I meant ceases to matter. Kids just see what I wrote. But I have to keep trying. My kids are counting on me.

So thank you, above all, to my former students who taught me. Alex Fierro is for you.

To you, I pledge myself to do better – to apologize when I screw up, to learn from my mistakes, to be there for LGBTQ youth and make sure they know that in my books, they are included. They matter. I am going to stop talking now, but I promise you I won’t stop listening.”

Things my theatre class has said:

•"Michael put your shirt back on.“

•"Stop dancing like magic Mike and run your lines.”

•"Put the sword back or so help me god.“

•"You gotta be an exotic dancer, man.”

•"God damn it Jerry.“

•"Wanna go to Starbucks and see how many cake pops I can fit in my mouth?”

•"I’ve got this shit down packed.“

•"Put the hand back.”

•"Let’s play murderer, I like that game.“

•"If she’s the lead girl, I’m fucking playing lead boy.”

•"Get the skeleton out of the closet.“

•"That’s an octopus in a jar.”

•"See you later, lesbian thespians.“

•"theatre class is the only reason I haven’t dropped out yet.”

•"Put the goddamn tutu and wings on, stop complaining.“

•"Tiny Ashia is a senior? What the fuck? When did that happen?”

•"Wanna hear my Shaggy immpression? I’ve been working on it.“

Catholic high school for me: The drama teacher was secretly gay, (but we all knew), the RE teacher secretly liked the only Muslim kid more than anyone because the only Muslim kid was, at least, passionate about his beliefs and prayed daily (And us Catholic kids were all largely indifferent.) Oh, and then there was the teacher who refused to teach us about condoms while admitting once she used birth control herself.

I’ve often suspected I could write a wacky sitcom about all this. 

One time in drama class we were playing this game where you have to keep asking each other questions but it has to be on the same topic, and I was up with this mean girl who everyone really doesn’t like bc she’s a bitch and she’s really dumb, and she was like ‘have you ever failed a test?’ And my sassy side came out and I was like 'have you ever passed one?’ (I said it in a sassy voice too) my teacher laughed so hard

on the new Iron Fist series

So after binge watching a ton of Marvel’s new Iron Fist series, I went onto tumblr, wondering what the fandom was up to now, what with all these new gifs and stuff to make. ‘Maybe I would find some fan art or something’ I thought innocently to myself,

BUT BOY WAS I WRONG

instead, I was greeted with SO MUCH DISCOURSE on how Iron Fist ‘needs a chinese-american actor’ or ‘has terrible dialogue and is slow’.

the best part is when I found out that some of y’all are trying to get this show boycotted like ‘????’

Now as a Chinese-speaking Asian female, living in Asia, with an Asian background and a good know-how of Chinese history, as well as a decent knowledge of comic books, (although I confess I got into the animated series first) I’m here to end the discussion before y’all get your full rage on and start fighting fans of the show like it’s Lord of the Flies up in here

So keep reading if you want to be educated or if you just want to fight me before you know what you’re even talking about

“THE SHOW INSULTS CHINESE CULTURE”

Uhhhh…no? I’ve seen a few episodes and I mean so far there isn’t really anything that screams ‘insult’ or even offensive in the slightest. Besides maybe the fact that they take the beliefs and twist them a little bit but honestly even that ain’t that bad as to what I’ve seen elsewhere.

I’ve read the boycott post and let me say that yea, they dressed him with an eye for Asian elements, but maybe that’s because it’s supposed to be resembling Asian clothing? I mean how is that offensive? Is it the part that it looks Asian? Or that you simply feel that white people that direct these shows should not be using Asian stuff for entertainment? Because I hate to break it to you but it’s still not offensive. Even the dragon tattoo is totally fine because it’s supposed to resemble Asian elements yea but also have y’all read the comics? Because he punched through a dragon and basically took it’s heart. So I mean a dragon tattoo kinda matches the theme.

I mean in the first episode they speak almost flawless Chinese for Pete’s sake! Hell, I was surprised that they even had it in them to have a non-Google translated line. Sure the accent was a little overdoing it cuz not even I have that thick a Chinese accent but I’ll excuse it since he was apparently learning and speaking 15 years. (I speak it maybe a few times a day for like the last 14 years or so only)

So no, the show doesn’t really insult Chinese culture, sure they might be ignorant, but you must understand that after generations of stereotypes and misconceptions that that can’t just go away with one show

“Danny Rand should be played by an Asian guy/be a Chinese-American”

I can’t even begin to tell you my frustration about this.

Y’all do know this show is based on the comics right?

You know, the one with the white guy.

I know Marvel is infamous for not including enough representation in their shows but seriously? This is like the Harry Potter thing all over again with Hermione being black, it’s not that we don’t want representation or anything, but it’s the fact that this hero that us comic fans have come to already love has been replaced. Or at least it feels like it. Like when a movie is made from a book and people go crazy because character XYZ suddenly has different traits or isn’t quite what was described as compared to the book.

Frankly, it sucks.

So even though yes, Marvel should have more Asians in their shows, don’t expect them to completely give the main character a makeover, even if the makeover was supposed to provide representation. And honestly? I don’t want them to change him because I really freaking love Iron Fist, just as he is.

“This show just villainizes Asians”

So you tell me that my race is being made villains because Marvel decided that most of their Asians on their shows are evil ninjas (aka the Hand) and at most there are like 3 sorta good Asians. Oh and I’m sorry, you want more Asian men that are good guys? You want a balance of Asian heroes?

Well I guess that would be kind of hard to fit into the story since, oh, I don’t know, everything happens in the USA?

If you want more Asian characters well then look no further because you do have them. Daisy Johnson from Agents of Shield? What about her extremely brave mom? Or maybe Colleen in Iron Fist? Everyone seems to be blatantly ignoring her badassery and only seeing the part where she’s a sorta love interest.

Facts are, there are Asian characters, you’re really just looking hard enough. I agree wholeheartedly when you say that more Asian men need to be in the Marvel universe that aren’t part of the bad guy team but you gotta say that they are still awesome.

Does anyone even remember the Japanese ninja yakuza guy from Daredevil? Dude got set on fire and STILL came back to kick ass. That’s a plus in my book because even though he’s considered bad, he’s been proven to be cunning, smart, and overall awesome.

“The show has terrible stunts/acting/dialogue/fight scenes”

From here on out it’s mostly just me trying to explain why the directors and writers of the show made decisions in the show to make it what it is, so let’s dive right into it.

  • STUNTS

Actually the stunts weren’t half-bad. If you’ve seen other shows or movies that are heavily reliant on stunts and action, and compare it to this show, they really aren’t that much different. Sure it might seem a little unbelievable sometimes like they’re breaking physics or something, but he already has a glowing fist. I think we’ve crossed the line of believable long ago.

  • ACTING

I have nothing to say about this except that go and take some acting or drama classes before coming and criticizing these awesome men and women who did indeed try their best

  • DIALOGUE

Now I get the dialogue might be a little weird at times and what not, but you must understand that this show was partially written with the Defenders series in mind. So almost everything that was said in the show is meant to lead to something more. Thus, you must take it as a bigger picture. Sorta like how everyone said that Fantastic Beast and Where to Find Them wasn’t as good as they thought it would be, that movie was also meant to lead on to a bigger story so you might want to excuse the weird speech and cryptic lines at times.

  • FIGHT SCENES & ACTION

Okay seriously people, please read the comics. Danny Rand is supposed to be an accidental hero, one that doesn’t want to fight unless he really has zero choice in the matter. So yea, the fight scenes won’t be that interesting, but only because the character in question is more interested in ending the fight than anything.

~

So there you have it, my whole slightly angry info-dump on Iron Fist and Marvel’s representation problem in general. If you want to correct me or scold me even then by all means message me or shoot me an ask. But just keep in mind that Marvel can’t make all your problems go away in one show, and please for the love of all that is good read the comics before coming to rant okay?

todays premiere of our les mis school production was just,….,, incredible….
like I got to play my favorite character, Grantaire, got a lapdance by the student who plays Enjolras but also a lovely lady, our whole class was shouting do you hear the people sing while dressing up for the show, I got a lapdance by Enjolras, we died holding hands, I got a lapdance by Enjolras

* Me listening to yaoi CD drama :
“Wow, just imagin the CVs’ face when they were recording this !”

~ Awkward ~~ :v

Oh did you know Midorima and Takao have a smutty audio too ? Update : Kise and Aomine also have one, kyaaaaah !!!
Funny story: When I was a drama student, we were all trying out for a role on some shitty low-key soap opera (I never had a chance, knew I didn’t, but eh, they said it would be fun and I should try anyway. I was 17. )

Then, at the audition, this girl walked in. She was jaw-droppingly gorgeous. 

No, the air actually went out of the room as soon as she walked in. And we all knew instantly she would get the part. Which she did. No question asked. Even the casting agents knew it. She was the loveliest thing you’ve ever seen. 

I said to her later on, when we walked out: “What’s it like to be as beautiful as you? It must be wonderful.” 

*Her* “But they drool over me. The guys. It’s…weird.”

*pause*

*Her* “I only got into this because my parents and everyone told me to. Because someone as pretty as me had to be in acting. I wanted to be an accountant.”

*Me* “Um…well…you’re, uh, photogenic.” 

*Her* “I can’t act!”

*Me* “Well, obviously. I know that. I saw your audition.”

Sexist and problematic things in K-Dramas that need to stop
  • Slamming women up against walls
  • Kissing women in their sleep
  • Forcibly kissing a woman when she clearly is trying to pull away
  • Just… kissing women without consent in general
  • Using a woman’s independence/strength/strong-headedness as an unattractive or undesirable aspect of their personality
  • Pitting women against each other because of a man
  • Only having 1-2 female characters, neither of which having any depth to their character and little to no backstory
  • Having the female lead’s mindset be centered around men or getting a man
  • Literally having no young female characters with high up job positions in companies and especially none without family ties
  • Frequently having an evil stepmother role, yet never having an evil stepfather role
  • Mothers constantly pressuring their daughters to get married
  • The gullible, clumsy female troupe
  • Making the female love interest’s problems more the man’s problem rather than her overcoming them herself
  • Over protective and over controlling boyfriends. Especially yelling ones.
  • Female characters giving up their identity or values for a man
  • Every single female character in a drama getting paired off with a guy but not the other way around
  • The women having bizarrely clean and expensive housing that is completely left unexplained and unrealistic to their economic status
  • Having the female lead be completely incompetent and dysfunctional in their work environment

Feel free to add anything I missed~!