douglas firs!

8

Rock House in Alberta 

This 800 sq. ft. one-bedroom cabin by Cutler Anderson Architects was nestled between two massive lichen-covered rocks in the rugged landscape of Alberta, Canada. Rock House is located at Carraig Ridge, “A hub of contemporary architecture, set in the foothills of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in southern Alberta.”

The approach is from the rear of the house through a wooden door, cut into a concrete wall. As one enters the cabin, a dramatic view of the rolling Canadian prairie, below, is revealed through floor-to-ceiling windows of thick insulated glass. The roof is supported by a central steel I-beam which rests on slender steel columns. Because this cabin is about its relationship to the land, each facade has glazing and is carefully cut into the rock. The material palette is board-formed concrete, Douglas Fir and steel.

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soabs  asked:

So first love your tumblr page, secondly I would like some advice, if that's alright to ask. I'm trying to write a story with a character from Oregon and I would like some idea on if they be any phrases words anything really to make it believable

- everyone from Oregon ends their sentences with “praise be to Bigfoot” to show both humility and gratitude
- Oregonians, colloquially known as “Orgies”, make a lot of puns about oregano
- Oregonians (“Orgies”) have a bitter rivalry with Washingtonians. Every seven years, on the appointed day, it is a tradition for residents of each state to gather on opposite sides of the Columbia River and hurl insults and rocks at each other. Since the Columbia River is very wide and throwing something across it is very difficult, these encounters can’t really be considered violent. It would be unrealistic if your character is from Oregon (or Washington) and does not frequently reference this important tradition.
- The Oregon Trail is considered a holy game, and it is always played at funerals to determine who in the family will be the next to die. If the game’s prediction is wrong, Orgies ignore reality and treat the prematurely deceased like living people while shunning those who were expected to die.
- You do not pump your own gas in Oregon - station attendants do it for you. Similarly, you’re not allowed to feed yourself at restaurants - specialized waiters and waitresses come to your table, sit you in their laps, and spoon-feed you.
- Do not mention that Oregon has fewer reported Bigfoot sightings than either California or Washington unless you want to be banned from the state
- In the more liberal parts of the state, you are expected to experiment sexually with a waterfall (if male) or a volcano (if female) at some point before graduating college
- for political complications, the role of black people will be played by white people with locked hair for this production
- A $4.35 cup of coffee in California will cost $400 in Oregon. If you complain, the barista will gently remind you, “No sales tax!” and you’ll end up buying six refills
- Social standing is expressed via the number of bumper stickers on your car.
- The state tree is the Douglas fir - a majestic conifer. In Oregon, a boner is frequently referred to as a “Douglas” or even just “Doug”. If an Orgie suddenly exclaims, “I’ve got to go meet up with Dougie,” it means he has become sexually aroused in an embarrassing way and will seek out the nearest waterfall to ease himself.
- A geoduck is a species of large, edible clam. “Geoduck” is therefore used as slang for both “penis” and “vagina”. The phrase “go Ducks!”, shouted at sportsball competitions, is actually a celebration of sexual liberation.
- Orgies do not use slang like “cool” or “tubular” or “awesome”. Instead, they say “That’s organic!”
- If a white guy tells you about the “spirit quest” he went on, he means he went camping and smoked a lot of weed. I mean a lot. Of. Weed.
- A popular sport is food truck racing.
- If a young person appears single, they are probably in a committed relationship with their bicycle.
- The most popular epithet to be engraved on tombstones is “Gone Squatchin’”

10

Stapleton Library in Staten Island

In the words of the architects Andrew Berman Architect:

The New York Public Library commissioned this branch library of 12,000 square feet. We restored the existing 1907 Carrere and Hastings Carnegie Library and designed a new 7,000 square foot building to be located alongside. The library is conceived as a modern public institution that will contribute to the revitalization of the Stapleton neighborhood.

The facility is an assemblage of old and new. The existing Carnegie Library was converted into the Childrens’ Reading Room. The new building, constructed of glue laminated Douglas fir posts, beams, joists and roof decking, houses books and media. The structurally glazed facade invites the public and supplies natural light. The exposed wood structure provides a sense of rhythm, scale and material richness unexpected in contemporary public buildings.

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Unproblematic Fave: Special Agent Dale Cooper

  • Endlessly positive and trusting
  • Probably fueled solely on black coffee and pie
  • Wants his friends to be good to themselves
  • When an 18 year old girl sneaks into his hotel room and gets in his bed naked he says that he just wants to be her friend because he knows thats what she needs and talks about her problems with her
  • When an old friend shows up having decided that they do not fit the gender they were assigned perfectly he adapts to her new pronouns and apologizes when he messes up.
  • Rly loves douglas fir trees

Check out this peaceful scene at Table Rock Wilderness in Oregon for International Day of Forests. See old growth Douglas fir and western hemlock along four terrific trails as you hike up to the “fortress” of Table Rock. Breathe in the rich, forest air and remember the poem by Robert Frost, “The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep. And miles to go before I sleep. And miles to go before I sleep.” Photo by Bureau of Land Management, @mypubliclands.

if the internet exists in 400 years, maybe future archaeologists can go back and read through my tumblr arguments about sustainable burial

while sitting in a tree house built in the Douglas fir I was buried under