double contractions

Now only accepting anon hate with sources cited Chicago or APA style.

1 inch margins, double spaced, no contractions, use short concise sentences, there must be a clearly defined thesis and at least three supporting points with evidence and a solid conclusion.

So if Yana never reveals anything about Sebastian’s past, does that mean any headcanon for him is now canon? Because that means the following ideas all have equal chance of being canon:

  • He could just be a cloud with limbs
  • He has a cooking show in hell and each contract doubles as an episode for his show
  • He likes sticking around Ciel because it’s an excuse to not go home, where he’s a wanted demon for tax evasion
  • He was there when Noah’s ark (the biblical one) happened and he snuck 20 extra cats on board
  • He’s the only crow demon left in existence because the rest were all like “so tired of life, we’re gonna jump this thingy and end our wretched existence” but Sebastian saw a cat at the last moment and decided not to jump down the thingy because he found his true love
  • He’s the only demon left, period. That’s why William hates him so much.
  • He spent every day of his life possessing people and laughing about it
  • He fought spring-heeled Jack over a pair of high heels
  • He dated a vampire and a mummy at the same time
Yo, Grammar: What's up with double contractions?

What an interesting question.

The short answer is that you should always avoid using double contractions—at least in formal writing. Contractions of any kind are generally frowned upon in formal writing, so you can bet that double contractions are doubly disapproved.

If you were to use double contractions in conversations, we doubt that anyone would correct you. For instance, if you said, “I’d’ve (I would have) gotten that question right,” none of your friends are likely to point out that you shouldn’t have used a double contraction.

However, your professor, teacher, or editor will definitely criticize you if you use “you’ll’ve (you will have)” in an essay. Some of them—rightly or wrongly—even take points off for legitimate contractions such as “it’s,” “I’m,” and “they’re.”

So take our advice and don’t use double contractions. There really is no need to do so.

You don’t even save that much time by using the contractions:

  • “I would have” = 2.01214 seconds.
  • “I’d’ve” = 2.01212 seconds.

Saving a whopping 0.00002 seconds and sounding dumb in the process is just not worth it. 

Cheers.

What’s up with double contractions?

(There’s no need to be so dramatic, Yoseob.) 😉

You should generally avoid using double contractions—at least in formal writing. Contractions of any kind are generally frowned upon in formal writing, so you can bet that double contractions are doubly disapproved (pun intended). 😏

If you were to use double contractions in conversations, we doubt that anyone would correct you. For instance, if you said, “I’d’ve (I would have) gotten that question right,” none of your friends are likely to point out that you shouldn’t have used a double contraction.

However, your professor, teacher, or editor will definitely criticize you if you use “you’ll’ve (you will have)” in an essay. Some of them—rightly or wrongly—even take points off for common single contractions such as “it’s,” “I’m,” and “they’re.”

So take our advice and don’t use double contractions. There really is no need to do so.

You don’t even save that much time by using the contractions. According to our extremely nonscientific research,

  • “I would have” = 2.01214 seconds ⏲
  • “I’d’ve” = 2.01212 seconds ⏲

Saving a whopping 0.00002 seconds and incurring the wrath of a teacher in the process is just not worth it.

(We feel you, Naruto. We feel you.)

Yo, Grammar: What's up with double contractions?

What an interesting question.

The short answer is no—at least in formal writing. Contractions of any kind are generally frowned upon in formal writing, so you can bet that double contractions are doubly disapproved.

If you were to use double contractions in conversations, we doubt that anyone would correct you. For instance, if you said, “I’d’ve (I would have) gotten that question right,” none of your friends are likely to point out that you shouldn’t have used a double contraction.

However, your professor, teacher, or editor will definitely criticize you if you use “you’ll’ve (you will have)” in an essay. Some of them—rightly or wrongly—even take points off for legitimate contractions such as “it’s,” “I’m,” and “they’re.”

So take our advice and don’t use double contractions. There really is no need to do so. (Avoiding having to type a few extra letters doesn’t save that much time anyway.)

Cheers.