dorm food

anonymous asked:

This year I'm moving into a school owned apartment on my school's campus, but the kitchenette only has a microwave. I'm kind of having a hard time looking for ways that I can cook myself more meals than just the frozen stuff at the grocery store and I wondered if you had some advice ?

Check out your college’s student handbook, and see if they allow any of the following cooking appliances. These can get expensive, but are well worth the money and will give you more dining options:

I would also recommend you get some cooking supplies like this set sold on Amazon. There’s also this microwave cooking set. I’ve scoured the Internet and found you the following recipes. 

Microwave Cooking Recipes

Apple Pie

Applesauce

Baked Potatoes/Yams

Banana French Toast Sticks

Brownie

Cauliflower Rice

Cheesy Flatbread

Chicken and Rice Wraps

Chocolate Cupcakes

Cookie In A Cup

Corn on the Cob

Egg Sandwich

Egg White Omelettes

Espresso Mug Cake

Fudge

Gluten Free Muffin

Green Bean Casserole

Grilled chicken + veggies

Ham, Cheese, and Chicken Rolls 

Humus

Mac + Cheese

Mac + Cheese 2

Mashed Potato

Microwave Mochi

Microwave Breakfast Mug

Mug Lasagna 

Nachos for One

Nutella Cookie

Oatmeal

Omelette In A Mug

Pasta

Pita Pizza

Peanutbutter Mug Cake

Pineapple Upside Down Cake

Pork Chinese Bun

Pork Chow Mein

Pulled Chicken Sandwich 

Pumpkin Cake

Rice

Rice + Veggies

Scrambled Eggs

Soup

Spaghetti Squash

Spiced Apple Cake

Stuffed Zucchini 

Sweet Potato Chips

Tuna Melt

Vegan Mug Brownies

Compilation Posts

“18 Microwave Snacks You Can Cook In A Mug” by Buzzfeed

“50 Healthy Microwave Recipes” by DIYNow.net

“Dining Hall Blues” by Michelle Ma

Ree Drummond’s “Dorm Room Dining”

This is honestly amazing, just trust me! I use the dr. Mcdougels microwave ramen soup cup and prepared the ramen without the seasoning packet. Then, I made some vegan chickn broth with some low sodium stock cubes (honestly a staple). Lastly, I topped with some microwaved stewed tomatoes (from the can, from Trader Joe’s). Mix it all up and AMAZING!!

for when you only have the energy to open a can of beans

ingredients:

  • can of refried beans (if, like me, you’re vegetarian, make sure you’re buying the vegetarian variety)
  • tortilla

optional ingredients:

  • shredded cheese
  • lettuce
  • cooked meat
  • condiments

instructions:

  • open a can of refried beans.
  • open a package of tortillas.
  • use a spoon to scoop some beans onto the tortilla. spread the beans out and roll the tortilla up. consume.

you have just obtained the perfect snack.

stick it in the microwave if you don’t mind using a plate.

if you’re feeling fancy, you can sprinkle on some shredded cheese. if you want to involve a vegetable you can do that. if you want to involve a meat you can do that too.

features:

  • no plate required
  • no cooking required
  • two steps
  • cheap as hell
  • the beans are already seasoned!
  • nutritious!!! beans are good for you. so are tortillas. eat that shit and feel your body get stronger.
  • it can be a snack or a meal, depending on how many you make

go forth and eat!

snowbell55  asked:

Thanks so much! I really appreciate it (especially the College Student's Cookbook), but I'm not so much looking for recipes as I am the processes and what things do, ie, how to cut up a chicken into pieces, what paprika does, how to fry things, which knife to use when you want to do "x", the difference between sauteing and frying, etc. Not so much "what to put together if you want to make X" but "if you do this then this will happen because of that". Do you have any resources for that?

Whoops, sorry I didn’t understand. I don’t have any resources for that, so I threw one together for you! My boyfriend has been a line cook for about seven years now, and he’s taught me so much about food. There are lots of simple things you can do to make food taste better- but let’s start with the basics.

College Cooking 101

Materials

Here is a list of materials that I believe are absolutely necessary to creating a quality product. Feel free to substitute anything based on your own personal preferences.

Cooking supplies:

  • Non-stick frying pan (cast iron pans are much more difficult to clean)
  • Pot (I would recommend a small pot that you can use to cook for just yourself, and a larger pot for cooking portions or for company)
  • Lid for said pot
  • Rubber spatula (much better than wooden spoons)
  • Tongs
  • Sheet tray
  • Strainer
  • Scissors (kitchen scissors)
  • A cutting board (I recommend plastic because they’re easier to wash)
  • Cutting knife
  • Bread knife (both knives should be sharpened every six months at least, you can take them to your local kitchen supplies shop)

Spices:

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Dried chives (or real chives if you can swing them. Throw them in your ramen, your tuna salad, sprinkle them on top of pasta, etc)
  • Thyme (dried or fresh… dried is 3x as potent, use to season soups or pastas)
  • Rosemary (dried or fresh, use to season meats and starches)
  • Cumin (use this spice to rub meat)
  • Cinnamon
  • Sugar
  • Garlic powder or onion powder (used for meat rubs and seasoning soups or sauces)
  • Paprika (I would recommend avoiding smoked paprika, it’s got a super aggressive flavor… use this in small amounts sprinkled over things like you would the chives)

Basic produce:

  • Parmesan cheese (for sprinkling over pastas, you can get it pre-grated)
  • Cheddar cheese (for making sandwiches and mac and cheese)
  • Tomatoes (whole, crushed, paste, whatever… just have some sort of tomato product in your pantry at all times)
  • Potatoes (you can’t buy them pre-cut because the oxidize and turn gray if not used immediately… you can still eat them, but they don’t look pretty)
  • Onions (you can get them pre-cut)
  • Garlic (use to make sauce or soup bases)
  • Romaine hearts (lettuce has a short shelf life, but romaine hearts literally last forever and are healthier than eating iceberg lettuce)
  • Protein of some sort (whatever you like- steak, chicken, tofu, etc)
  • Something salty (like pickles, black olives, anchovies, etc)
  • Your favorite veggies (I like carrots and squashes the best)
  • Pasta (whatever is cheapest or on sale at your store)
  • Bread (freeze half a loaf and leave the rest in your fridge)
  • Eggs (egg beaters or whole eggs, whatever you like)
  • Butter (or a butter substitute)
  • Oil (olive oil is the most expensive)
  • Chicken stock (or vegetable stock, in a carton or cubed)


Techniques

Basic (super duper duper basic) instructions on how to cook various items. I am not a trained professional- the information I’m providing is based off of personal experience only.

Meat

  • Steak (skirt steak or cube steak are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside of the steak should be grey. The inside should be light pink.
    • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want.
    • Pair with: Starches or veggies.
  • Chicken (skinless and precut are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside should be white and dry.
    • Seasoning: Salt and pepper work best. You can also coat chicken in panko bread crumbs.
    • Pair with: Starches, veggies, fruits, or pasta.
  • Pork (pork chops are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with butter or oil. Outside should be starting to crisp. Inside should be the same color as the outside, and should feel very dry and hard.
    • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want. Meat should be completely coated in the spice rub, or it won’t taste like anything but the oil.
    • Pair with: Starches, veggies, or fruits.

Starches

  • Potatoes (little potatoes are easiest)
    • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside fork tender.
    • Seasoning: Rub (literally rub the potatoes with your hands) salt, pepper, oil and rosemary all over the potatoes.
  • Pasta (shapes are easiest)
    • Cooking: Boil water with a teaspoon of salt. Wait until the water is visibly boiling to add your pasta. I like my pasta al dente, so I always cook it for the shortest amount of time listed on the box.
    • Seasoning: Thoroughly coat pasta with whatever sauce you’re using, or it will taste dry. Good prepared sauce brands: Newman’s Own, Classico, and Barilla.
  • Orzo/Cous Cous/Pastina
    • Cooking: Cook in chicken or vegetable stock following package instructions. Stir every so often, and add additional stock as it is absorbed into the pasta.
    • Seasoning: I like to add dried herbs to the sauce as it reduces to add flavor. You can also add veggies early on and let them cook in the sauce.

Veggies

  • Carrots/parsnips/beets (chopped are easiest)
    • Cooking: These can be pan fried in oil, boiled, cooked in a sauce/stew, or put on a sheet tray to roast in the oven. The easiest way to cook them is to add them to a sauce that you are heating up, and allow them to soften until they can be pierced by a fork.
    • Seasoning: Rub the veggies with salt before cooking, unless you are adding them to a sauce or stew.
  • Green beans/asparagus/brussels sprouts
    • Cooking: These are best pan fried with butter. Cook them until they are slightly crisped and fork tender. If you want to be fancy you can blanch them before hand. How to blanch: Boil water, and throw the veggies in for literally thirty seconds. Pour them into a strainer and douse them immediately with cold water from your sink tap until they are cool to the touch.
    • Seasoning: Salt works best before cooking. Butter after cooking.
  • Squash/eggplant/sweet potato (chopped are easiest)
    • Yes I know that sweet potato is a starch, but it fits better here.
    • Cooking: These veggies are best roasted until fork tender. Time varies. These veggies should be cooked with their skin left on.
    • Seasoning: Rub these veggies with salt and cook in a little oil. Top with butter after they are cooked.


Resources

- My Pasta Sauce Post. Click here.

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)


I hope this helps!

Nine things to do with hard boiled eggs

Hard-boiled eggs are a fast source of protein, and can last for 2 weeks in the fridge peeled or unpeeled. My family has always kept a bowl of hard boiled eggs in the fridge for easy snaking and quick meals. However, eating plain eggs again and again can be boring, so here are some ways to mix them up.

To make a large quantity of hard boiled eggs quickly, place a couple cups of water in the bottom of a large pot, put a colander in the pot, and put the eggs in the colander. Put the lid on, and turn the heat to high. Once the water is boiling, steam the eggs for 13 minutes. Then, move the pot to the sink and fill it with cold water. When the eggs are cool enough to handle, peel them and store them n a container with a lid. Steaming the eggs is faster and more energy efficient than boiling an entire pot of water.

Here are things to do:

  1. Cut eggs into wedges and sprinkle with salt and pepper (although my brother, the absolute mad-man, swears by salt and maple syrup). A couple slices of microwave bacon gives you a robust breakfast.
  2. Put sliced hard-boiled egg on cooked instant ramen.
  3. Make deviled eggs: pop the cooked yolk into a bowl, and mix in 1-2 tsp of mayo for each egg yolk. Season with spices to taste—paprika is traditional, but chipotle is amazing too. Return the egg yolk to the whites, and you have a quick and flavourful lunch.
  4. Obviously, egg salad can be served on crackers or in a sandwich:

-          For a basic egg salad, chop the eggs finely, and mix in 2-3 tsp mayo per egg. Start with less mayo and then see if it needs more—you can always add, but never subtract.

-          Once variation is to mash in avocado instead of mayo (or in addition to mayo if you like)

-          If you have the energy, a little minced onion or celery adds nice flavour and texture

-          Add curry powder, paprika, or mustard for flavour variation

5. Slice eggs and put them on a sandwich with ham, pickles, mayo and chives (if available)
6. Soy sauce egg: In a ziplock bag, mix two parts soy-sauce to one part sugar. Submerge the peeled egg(s) in the sauce, and let sit for a minimum of 2 hours. The longer you let them sit, the stronger and deeper the flavour will be (I have found that after 12 hours, the flavour is too strong for me). You may add a small piece of ginger and/or garlic, or a spoonful of cooking wine to the sauce to enhance the flavour. Soy sauce eggs, removed from the sauce, will keep for several days in the fridge.
7. Put sliced egg, tomato and cheese on toast
8. Put sliced avocado, egg, and hot sauce on toast
9. This one may seem a little weird, but it’s pretty good. Thaw some frozen peas in the microwave. Drain the peas of any liquid. Mix in a small pat of butter, a little shredded cheese, and a chopped hard-boiled egg. Microwave until the cheese and butter have melted.

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for using seasonings when cooking? Or tips to help cook in general for some one new to it.

College Cooking 101

Materials

Here is a list of materials that I believe are absolutely necessary to creating a quality product. Feel free to substitute anything based on your own personal preferences.

Cooking supplies:

  • Non-stick frying pan (cast iron pans are much more difficult to clean)
  • Pot (I would recommend a small pot that you can use to cook for just yourself, and a larger pot for cooking portions or for company)
  • Lid for said pot
  • Rubber spatula (much better than wooden spoons)
  • Tongs
  • Sheet tray
  • Strainer
  • Scissors (kitchen scissors)
  • A cutting board (I recommend plastic because they’re easier to wash)
  • Cutting knife
  • Bread knife (both knives should be sharpened every six months at least, you can take them to your local kitchen supplies shop)

Spices:

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Dried chives (or real chives if you can swing them. Throw them in your ramen, your tuna salad, sprinkle them on top of pasta, etc)
  • Thyme (dried or fresh… dried is 3x as potent, use to season soups or pastas)
  • Rosemary (dried or fresh, use to season meats and starches)
  • Cumin (use this spice to rub meat)
  • Cinnamon
  • Sugar
  • Garlic powder or onion powder (used for meat rubs and seasoning soups or sauces)
  • Paprika (I would recommend avoiding smoked paprika, it’s got a super aggressive flavor… use this in small amounts sprinkled over things like you would the chives)

Basic produce:

  • Parmesan cheese (for sprinkling over pastas, you can get it pre-grated)
  • Cheddar cheese (for making sandwiches and mac and cheese)
  • Tomatoes (whole, crushed, paste, whatever… just have some sort of tomato product in your pantry at all times)
  • Potatoes (you can’t buy them pre-cut because the oxidize and turn gray if not used immediately… you can still eat them, but they don’t look pretty)
  • Onions (you can get them pre-cut)
  • Garlic (use to make sauce or soup bases)
  • Romaine hearts (lettuce has a short shelf life, but romaine hearts literally last forever and are healthier than eating iceberg lettuce)
  • Protein of some sort (whatever you like- steak, chicken, tofu, etc)
  • Something salty (like pickles, black olives, anchovies, etc)
  • Your favorite veggies (I like carrots and squashes the best)
  • Pasta (whatever is cheapest or on sale at your store)
  • Bread (freeze half a loaf and leave the rest in your fridge)
  • Eggs (egg beaters or whole eggs, whatever you like)
  • Butter (or a butter substitute)
  • Oil (olive oil is the most expensive)
  • Chicken stock (or vegetable stock, in a carton or cubed)

Techniques

Basic (super duper duper basic) instructions on how to cook various items. I am not a trained professional- the information I’m providing is based off of personal experience only.

Meat

  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside of the steak should be grey. The inside should be light pink.
  • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want.
  • Pair with: Starches or veggies.
  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside should be white and dry.
  • Seasoning: Salt and pepper work best. You can also coat chicken in panko bread crumbs.
  • Pair with: Starches, veggies, fruits, or pasta.
  • Cooking: Cook with butter or oil. Outside should be starting to crisp. Inside should be the same color as the outside, and should feel very dry and hard.
  • Seasoning: Create a simple spice blend and rub it all over the meat. Spice rubs always include salt and pepper, add whatever other spices you want. Meat should be completely coated in the spice rub, or it won’t taste like anything but the oil.
  • Pair with: Starches, veggies, or fruits.

Starches

  • Cooking: Cook with oil. Outside should be starting to crisp, inside fork tender.
  • Seasoning: Rub (literally rub the potatoes with your hands) salt, pepper, oil and rosemary all over the potatoes.
  • Cooking: Boil water with a teaspoon of salt. Wait until the water is visibly boiling to add your pasta. I like my pasta al dente, so I always cook it for the shortest amount of time listed on the box.
  • Seasoning: Thoroughly coat pasta with whatever sauce you’re using, or it will taste dry. Good prepared sauce brands: Newman’s Own, Classico, and Barilla.
  • Cooking: Cook in chicken or vegetable stock following package instructions. Stir every so often, and add additional stock as it is absorbed into the pasta.
  • Seasoning: I like to add dried herbs to the sauce as it reduces to add flavor. You can also add veggies early on and let them cook in the sauce.

Veggies

  • Cooking: These can be pan fried in oil, boiled, cooked in a sauce/stew, or put on a sheet tray to roast in the oven. The easiest way to cook them is to add them to a sauce that you are heating up, and allow them to soften until they can be pierced by a fork.
  • Seasoning: Rub the veggies with salt before cooking, unless you are adding them to a sauce or stew.
  • Cooking: These are best pan fried with butter. Cook them until they are slightly crisped and fork tender. If you want to be fancy you can blanch them before hand. How to blanch: Boil water, and throw the veggies in for literally thirty seconds. Pour them into a strainer and douse them immediately with cold water from your sink tap until they are cool to the touch.
  • Seasoning: Salt works best before cooking. Butter after cooking.
  • Yes I know that sweet potato is a starch, but it fits better here.
  • Cooking: These veggies are best roasted until fork tender. Time varies. These veggies should be cooked with their skin left on.
  • Seasoning: Rub these veggies with salt and cook in a little oil. Top with butter after they are cooked.

Resources

- My Pasta Sauce Post. Click here.

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)

I hope this helps!

Restaurant style hummus

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dry chickpeas
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • salt to taste
  • juice of one large lemon 
  • ¾ cup of ice!

Steps

Chickpeas

  1. Soak the chickpeas for 24 hrs changing the water at least twice
  2. Wash and drain the chickpeas
  3. Cover with fresh water (3 inches over) add the bay leaves and baking soda
  4. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and cover
  5. Cook for one hour or until the chickpeas become very soft and easy to mush

Hummus

  1. Let the chickpeas cool completely
  2. Blend the chickpeas with all the ingredients until very smooth
  3. Taste and adjust to your liking
  4. Garnish with extra chickpeas and paprika or cumin
Tomato Sauce

There is nothing that I love more than a bowl of pasta with tomato sauce. Tomato sauce is inexpensive, versatile, and so easy to make. You can literally let it stew for hours unattended while you do your thing. I am known amongst my friends and family as the tomato sauce queen. Here are some of my tips and also some of my favorite recipes. 🍅 

Thick Tomato Sauce 

The only way to make thick tomato sauce is to use canned tomatoes. Fresh tomatoes create a thinner sauce. Trust me. Don’t believe the haters who say that a complex sauce can’t be created in a half hour. They are liars! Thick tomato sauce is great for anything from ravioli to shells. It’s also better for weird pasta shapes (like wheels) than thin pasta, because it coats better. 

1. Pricing. There are different qualities of canned tomatoes, different brands costing anywhere from 89 cents to $6.00. You can taste a slight difference with the tomatoes themselves, but not enough to warrant dropping lots of money. I recommend just going to your local Dollar Store and buying bulk cans of whatever is cheapest. One 12 oz can of tomatoes makes two meals for me.

2. Canned variety. Sometimes I like to buy “fire roasted tomatoes” or “herbed tomatoes” to mix it up. Even with the stronger varieties, any initial taste they have will be mostly covered up by whatever you put in the sauce. Remember: fresh herbs are always better than dried ones! 

3. Building your sauce. If you’re going to put anything that needs cooking in your sauce (NOT meat, but any garlic, onions, mushrooms, carrots) cook these in a sauce pan first. Use oil, not butter. Add any dried herbs or spices you want to this initial mix. 

4. Get going. Add your tomato sauce to the pan and get it bubbling. Now is the time to add anything that doesn’t need cooking (olives, capers, anchovies, pickled anything). I like to use brines in my sauces, so I add them at this point. For example, if I’m making a puttanesca sauce, I’ll add my black olives and pour the black olive juice right into my pan. 

5. Taste it. Take a spoonful and taste it. If you don’t like it’s taste, add some more spices. If it’s too acidic, add tomato paste. At this point you can either turn it on low and let it cook for an hour, which creates a very rich and thick sauce. Or, you can cook some meat or veggies and add your fresh herbs. Always ad your fresh herbs in right before you’re about to eat! Otherwise they’ll wilt and you won’t taste their flavor. 

Some easy thick sauces:

  • Puttanesca: From Series of Unfortunate events (and also Italy). Cook garlic and onions first. Don’t let them brown too much, just get them not raw. Add your canned tomatoes, let the sauce sizzle while adding salt and pepper (don’t go crazy on the salt). Add anchovies, black olives, capers, and other pickled things (pickled mushrooms, jalapeños, pearl onions, etc). Pour your black olive juice right into the sauce pan. Let it cook until the sauce has absorbed the olive juice. Top with cheese.
  • Marinara: Brown some garlic and onions in olive oil. Add tomato paste to the pan after the onions and garlic have turned golden, and swirl it around so that it gets toasted. Add your canned tomatoes and any dried herbs you may be using (thyme, parsley, oregano… but be gentle with your oregano pouring). Let reduce if you added the dried herbs, otherwise add fresh herbs and serve immediately. Put this on your pizza or in your lasagna. 
  • Bolognese: Cook your meat first with oil, seasoning with cumin, garlic powder, pepper and salt. Or whatever spice blend you enjoy. Remove the cooked meat, and use the juices as the base for your tomato sauce. Pour your canned tomatoes and mix the sauces. Add chopped carrots or your other favorite vegetables. Cook until the veggies are fork tender, and add your meat back in. Hearty and warming! 

Thin Tomato Sauce 

This type of sauce always reminds me of summertime at my parent’s house when my mom would make her basil tomato sauce (see bellow). A thin sauce doesn’t have to be lighter than a thick sauce, but it definitely interacts with pasta differently and really needs a long pasta or a penne pasta to properly pick it up.

1. Fresh tomatoes. You don’t need to spend your lifesavings on beautiful heirloom tomatoes (in fact I’d urge you to just eat any heirloom tomato you happen upon raw). Any old tomato will do, even ones that are starting to sag and move towards the end of their lives. One fresh tomato makes two meals for me.

2. Cutting tomatoes. Cut the bottom of the tomato off and slice your tomato that way, cutting into the core. This way, no part of your tomato goes unused. For quick cooking, chop the tomato up small. If you have more time, leave large chunks to caramelize. You get a bit more flavor this way, but we don’t all have the luxury of time, so don’t stress about it.

3. Sauce base. With this type of tomato sauce, your base is 90% oil. The tomatoes themselves aren’t heavy enough to carry themselves, so do not skimp on the oil. I recommend cooking garlic and onions and browning them before adding your tomatoes. Allow them to dissolve into the sauce while you do your dishes or whatever. 

4. Acidity. Fresh tomatoes can make for a really acidic sauce. Make sure to cook some veggies or meat to help balance out the flavor. Cook these in a separate pan while your tomatoes are reducing. Remove them, and pour their juices into the sauce. I recommend bacon. 

5. Too much reducing/gloppy sauce. You may have to add water if your sauce becomes too reduced. Don’t worry if you add too much water, just let the sauce reduce to a comfortable consistency. Add your fresh herbs minutes before it’s done. I would skip the spices or dried herbs, their taste is too powerful for this sort of sauce. 

Some easy thin sauce combos: 

  • Hello onion: Caramelize half an onion. Chop it up into thin slices so that it will cook faster. Cook bacon and pour the drippings over the cooking onion. Add your fresh tomatoes and add water to help everything reduce. Be careful adding salt, the pasta will have salt from the bacon juices already. Add the crumbled bacon after you’ve turned the sauce off. 
  • Mom’s basil sauce: Using olive oil and chopped garlic, cook tomatoes with salt and pepper. Add basil when the tomatoes have reduced. 
  • Veggie blast: Brown onions and garlic (or not). After they’ve browned, add your favorite veggies to the sauce. I have a soft spot for squashes so I like to use eggplant and whatever squash we have in our fridge. I encourage you to get creative and to try different things. Add your tomatoes shortly after adding your veggies, because you don’t want the veggies to overcook and becoming mushy. Add spinach or kale after the sauce has reduced, and season heavily with salt and pepper. Seriously, veggies need salt.
6

Nothing makes me quite as emo quite as fast as remembering that Hyerin worked a part-time job (secretly) and would bring food home for the girls. The other members had no idea she’d gotten a job to help support them. All they knew is that she’d come back to the dorm with food for them. Hyerin kept it to herself to keep them from worrying. And if that ain’t the REALEST, I don’t know what is.

Mark my words: there are going to be plenty of times when you either will not want to go to the campus dining hall or you’re too lazy to go. When this happens, you’re gonna want some food stashed away in your room. Here are some of my fave dorm goodies:

  • Almonds – Get chocolate-covered almonds for a decadent treat!
  • Applesauce – 100% underrated. Pro tip: Buy the cups/pouches for easy cleanup!
  • Snack Mixes – Chex Mix for days
  • Peanut butter crackers – When you need something salty
  • Granola bars – Easy grab-and-go breakfast!
  • Fruit cups – Healthy option that lasts long
  • Cereal – The normal box will last longer, but those single serve cups keep you from buying bowls
  • Popcorn – Not just for movie nights, you know
  • Animal crackers – My kindergarten teacher was definitely onto something
  • Ice cream – In the words of the immortal Tom Haverford and Donna Meagle, “Treat yo self”

What are your favorite dorm snacks??

Easy Better Ramen

So being a college kid, ramen is kind of the major cheap meal I can make, but let’s be real, you can only have plain ramen so often. So this is kind of the “better ramen” recipe I make!

Keep in mind pretty much all of the extra things are optional, so go ahead and pick and choose whatever you wanna add to it.

Ingredients:

  • Ramen (brand really doesn’t matter, but make sure it’s one where the noodles and flavoring are separate)
  • 1 Egg
  • OPTIONAL: butter or nonstick spray for the egg
  • Peanut butter (I do crunchy, but it doesn’t really matter)
  • Hoisin sauce or soy sauce (both, either, or neither, it’s up to you!)
  • Canned or frozen veggies– I usually use corn and carrots carrots
  • Onion (either onion powder or fresh or frozen)
  • Garlic (again, fresh or powdered)

Tools/Things you need:

  • Bowls (1-2+, depending)
  • Fork/spoon

What to do:

  1. Heat up your veggies in a bowl in the microwave, make sure not to use too much so you can add your noodles
  2. In a separate bowl, crack your egg and scramble it with the butter or nonstick spray– add a little bit of water into the egg scramble. Microwave for about 45 seconds to a minute and a half: watch the egg while it microwaves, because if you let it overcook it might pop or splatter.
  3. Heat up your ramen noodles the way you normally would in the microwave, but don’t add the packet
  4. Drain the cooked noodles to about half
  5. Add ¼ to ½ of the seasoning packet to the water
  6. Add 1 spoonful of peanut butter and mix it in with the ramen broth until smooth
  7. Add a few drops of soy sauce and/or a very small amount of hoisin sauce (careful! Hoisin is very strong and a very little bit goes a long way!)
  8. Add your garlic and onion and mix in
  9. Take the cooked egg and break it up with 2 forks, to get lots of little egg bits, and add it to the ramen too
  10. Add your veggies and stir that in and enjoy! A lot of this is personal preference, so your measurements might be different than mine

You can add more or less of anything here too, so don’t feel constrained to my recipe– this is just what I usually do because of what I have on hand. All of this can be done in the microwave or on the stove, I’ve done it both ways!

anonymous asked:

Hi, first off I love your blog! Next, I work full time at differing hours and am having a hard time with breakfasts lately. When I work late I have no issue eating some cereal in the morning, but whenever I'm working early its pop-tarts or McDonald's. Do you have any tips for a healthier start? I love breakfast but I'm tired of these pop-tarts lol.

I can relate so much to this!

Breakfast on the Go

1. Breakfast Burritos. Cook these in bulk during your downtime and freeze them all! Defrost them and throw them in a microwave on your way out the door. BOOM.

2. Granola/Cereal Bags. One of my favorite quick breakfasts. Buy your favorite granola and/or cereal and divide it into plastic bags. Are store brands too expensive or not to your liking? Make your own granola with dried fruit, nuts, protein bites, flax seeds, etc. It’s okay to put a handful of chocolate in, just so long as you make your mix 95% healthy. My favorite brand is Bakery on Main (they’re gluten free btw).

3. Yogurt. Buy yogurt in bulk and top with your favorite granola or fresh fruit. My boyfriend loves the Siggis brand. This particular greek yogurt is packed with a ridiculous amount of protein and not overly sweet.

4. Bagels/toast. Bagels/toast literally take five minutes to prepare in the morning, and can be topped with anything from cream cheese to peanut butter. Buy bulk and freeze what you’re not eating immediately. 

5. Smoothies. Smoothies are a wonderfully healthy alternative to most of your other breakfast options! Blend your favorite fruits and veggies, most smoothies will keep for 48 hours. If you would prefer the easier route of a pre-made smoothie, I recommend Bolthouse smoothies. These will keep in your fridge for up to a week!

6. Oats. The sensation that is sweeping the nation! Click here.

7. Health Food Bars. You know the ones I’m talking about- Cliff Bars, Luna Bars, etc. While these can get pricey, they require no effort on your part and can be stored for upwards of six months. 

8. Fruit. There is nothing that I love more than a cut up apple and a spoon full of chunky peanut butter. Keep your fridge stocked with all your favorite fruits. Apples and bananas are delicious all year long and easy to eat on the go, because they require zero preparation. Add peanut butter to give yourself an added dose of protein.

9. Hardboiled Eggs. I would recommend preparing these in bulk when you have time. Hardboiled eggs will last in your fridge for up to a week! Buy yourself a handy dandy egg slicer and sprinkle with your favorite seasonings. 

10. Leftovers. I love eating leftovers for breakfast- just throw them in your microwave or oven and they’re ready to go in no time. I particularly love eating leftover pizza, salad, and sandwiches for breakfast. 

Also please check out my favorite food-related infographic! Excellent suggestions for meals/snacks on the go.

Hope this helps!

An eclectic, but delicious lunch! I made toast with Ezekiel 4:9 Cinnamon Raisin bread and topped it with peanut butter, banana, and cinnamon, then I cut open an avocado and topped with salt and pepper and enjoyed with some Edwards and Sons Brown Rice Snaps as well as a glass of Trader Joe’s Orange Peach Mango juice!

Easy Alfredo pasta

I saw the recipe online and made a few changes, and holy moly did this come out delicious. Definitely not healthy or light, but delicious.

What you’ll need:

  • Butter or margerine - 4 tbsp
  • Olive oil - 3 tbsp
  • Minced garlic - 2 tbsp (I bought the stuff that already comes pre-minced, it’s cheap and keeps in the fridge for a really long time)
  • Heavy cream - 2 cups
  • Grated parmesan cheese - ½ cup
  • Mozzarella, also grated or chopped - 1 cup
  • OPTIONAL: Mushrooms - 2 cups (I used the Paris ones, dunno how good this would be with other kinds. IF you’re not using the mushrooms, you can reduce the butter and the oil to 3 tbsp and 2 tbsp respectively)
  • The pasta of your choice - 12 ounces (about 300g or a regular box)
  • Milk to thin it out if it gets too thick

How to make the thing:

  • Boil some water and add in the pasta once it’s consistently boiling. Leave it in for about five minutes, then drain and set aside. Yes, you absolutely can do this while you’re preparing the sauce.
  • Cut up the mushrooms.
  • On a separate pan, melt the butter and the olive oil. Add mushrooms. Stir it all together for about a minute, then take out the mushrooms and set them aside.
  • Add the garlic and the cream. Stir and let it simmer until everything is well incorporated.
  • Add the parmesan and simmer until it’s thick. For me that took seven minutes.
  • Add mozzarella. Stir until it’s all combined.
  • If the sauce is thick and gloopy, you can add milk little by little until it’s thinner, stirring thoroughly each time you add a bit of milk. I added about a cup.
  • Put the mushrooms back in, then the pasta. Stir it all together.
  • Enjoy!