don't be deleting those scenes

TURИ S3E1 Deleted Scene
  • (For those who don't have access. Keep in mind, this is very bare-bones and fails to capture the full effect, but should give you some idea of the scene. There's a lot of back-and-forth, close-up cuts between Ben, Washington, and a medium shot of both of them. I did not detail every time this happens.)
  • -
  • [The shot looks out from inside a tent. It is Night. Ben approaches, walking past one guard to enter the tent.]
  • Ben: Sir.
  • [The shot turns to reveal a long table. Washington sits at the other end, quill in hand and surrounded by paperwork. He glances up, studies Ben for several seconds before taking a breath and laying his quill down.]
  • Washington: I'm reviewing General Orders to be published tomorrow. I seem to recall requesting you write the report on the execution of Col. Bradford and Sgt. Hickey.
  • [Ben seems taken aback]
  • Ben: Yes sir (he approaches) you should have it, sir. (touches a piece of paper) It's, uh, it's right here in front of you.
  • Washington: (casually) You were to detail their final words. Their confession to counterfeiting. Instead, you make them sound like villains, and unrepentant ones.
  • Ben: Which is the truth.
  • Washington: (smiling) Yet it doesn't ring true. Men seldom revel in their evil in the gallows.
  • Ben: Well, I don't see them as men.
  • Washington: You don't?
  • Ben: No, sir.
  • Washington: (looking at his paper instead of Ben, speaks softly) What do you see them as?
  • Ben: ...scum. traitors. Tories.
  • Washington: (keeps writing) My mother could be considered a Tory...
  • Ben: (visibly distressed) Sir, you know that I mean-
  • Washington: -that's not the point. (looks at Ben) The point is discretion. As you yourself have stressed.
  • Ben: But don't you see? In the interest of discretion, we're protecting the reputation of /snakes/.
  • Washington: (smiles broadly, as if amused) And what do you think the Tories would call your friend, Woodhull, if they catch him?
  • Ben: (pauses, shifts) The same thing that they called my friend, Nathan Hale. An enemy spy.
  • Washington: Hm. The low sort. Not even a man. (evenly) Your thoughts were with Hale when you saw those men hanged.
  • Ben: (looks away) Yes sir.
  • Washington: When you see /any/ man hanged.
  • Ben: (looks down) Yes, sir.
  • Washington: And how many executions have you witnessed?
  • Ben: (looks to Washington) Fourteen, sir.
  • Washington: But Hale is not like Hickey. For his cause was just.
  • (Ben Nods)
  • Washington: (pauses, seems to consider) Do you remember his final words?
  • Ben: Of course. They were inspired by Cato, which we performed together at Yale.
  • (Ben looks away, seems to struggle for a moment)
  • Ben: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country,"
  • Washington: (smiles, nods) Hm, very good. (with a small laugh) Except, he never said it. (lowers voice) /We/ did.
  • [Ben frowns, confused. Washington reaches over and pushes out a chair for him. Ben hesitates before sitting.]
  • Washington: When I received the news from Captain Montressor, Gen. Howe's Aide de Camp, it described Hale behaving with great composure and resolution. (Ben nods) Before hanging, he said he thought it the duty of every good officer to obey any order given him by his Commander in Chief.
  • (Ben appears greatly troubled by this)
  • Washington: He wished to be seen as a soldier, not a spy. He wasn't selflessly thinking of his country, but rather his own reputation. How his death would be received by his family, upon learning their son was a spy.
  • (Ben remains silent and still further troubled. He mouths he word 'no' once.)
  • Washington: (softly) Yes. We altered what he said. And thus converted a failed mission into an act of martyrdom. I imagine Captain Hale would approve.
  • (Ben continues to look uncomfortable, shifting and closing his eyes, finally looks up at Washington)
  • Ben: And so you think the Tories will turn these assassins into martyrs as well?
  • Washington: (emphatically) Not if we brand them as forgers first. Though it must be convincing. Our conflict with His Majesty erupted into full war over a single page of words on paper. The great contest we now find ourselves in is over whose word will be the final one.
  • Ben: (somewhat thickly, forced) I understand, sir. But, with respect, I'm afraid I cannot be the one to write it.
  • Washington: (momentarily looks away, looks back) Then I will write it.
  • (Ben immediately and wordlessly stands, returns the chair, and after a minute bow hurries away. Washington watches him leave, expression neutral.)
2

“…I can read, Jack, because it beats what you’re doing.”
“What’s that?”
“Waiting for something to happen.”

  • LOST - “How can you read?”

Bonus:

The Klaroline Law

No person or organization may delete, omit, destroy, or hold any Klaroline scene. Any and all moments filmed with the characters Klaus Mikaelson and Caroline Forbes must be included in the episode and made available to viewers. If need be, one may cut out scenes with any other character to make room.

Failure to comply with this law is in violation of the 8th amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America which prohibits cruel and unusual punishment.