domain

5

It was now that the Domain opened to me, without benefit of ancilla, interface, or past experience. It was new, deep, appropriately shapeless—that made sense. I was dying, after all…

Before the bump, and the sudden inrush of cold, clean air—breathable air, but with a sharp tang of soot and ozone—the Domain lifted up and away. I was grateful to be free of it.

For a moment, I doubted I had seen anything but a reflection of my own emotions and predicament.

“Sometimes, there is a kind of broken-mirror aspect.” [Halo: Cryptum]

Banana, plantain. Musa paradisiaca. Illustration by Jean Theodore Descourtilz. Le jardin des plantes, Bernard, P., Couailhac, L. (1842) by Swallowtail Garden Seeds
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From our collection of botanical photographs, illustrations, and paintings. We hope you will enjoy these images as much as we do.

Tree of Life

The first record we have of a classification system for living organisms comes in the writings of Aristotle, who divided organisms into just Plants and Animals. By the time I first began to study biology (not quite as far back as Aristotle, but close), there were five kingdoms of living organisms: Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Protista, and Monera, based on the system of classification developed by Linnaeus in the mid-1700’s. Animalia, Plantae, and Fungi were pretty obvious areas of classification to me, even as a freshman biology student. Monera was where bacteria were placed and Protista, of course, was the junk drawer of the kingdoms, where all of the odds and ends were put.

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Gordonia lasianthus with Fork-tailed Flycatcher. (1833)

by Swallowtail Garden Seeds 

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