doing this for each character!

Okay real talk… If the Power Rangers writers were trying to make Kimberly seem straight (trying being the operative word)… Why did she have a girl’s nudes in the first place??? 

Not to mention her having the Bisexual Bob and having a date with Trini in Krispy Kreme

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In any time, in whatever apperance… he’s still handsome

prongswhatthefuck2  asked:

What are some good tips for getting started with writing a book? I have a concept but i can't put it into place.

Getting Started with Your Story

There’s no one way to start writing a book. For some people, it’s enough to just jump in and start writing to see where the story takes them. If you’re not too keen on that idea, then here is one process (as in, not the only process) that might help you move beyond your concept. 

  • Concept ≠ Plot

Many writers mistake concept for plot, but they’re actually two very different things. A world where everyone grows up with superpowers is a concept; the plot is what you decide to write about within that concept - the specific characters and what happens to those characters; who your antagonist is and what conflict arises when that antagonist goes after what they want. All of these things contribute to your plot. 

So first, define what it is you actually have at this particular point. Do you just have a concept? If so, you’ll need to take the necessary steps to develop that concept into a plot. 

  • Concept >>> Plot

If you’ve decided that all you really have is a concept, then how do you take it and turn it into a plot? You brainstorm. All brainstorming really amounts to is expanding your ideas. All you’re doing is asking questions about the concept and delving deep into the answers. 

The most simplistic way to start this process, especially if you’re struggling, is to ask one of two questions (or both, if applicable). These two questions: What could go wrong? What could go right?

Going back to my example about a world where everyone grows up with superpowers. If I were to ask the question “what could go wrong,” I’d end up with a whole list of possibilities. 

  • The powers suddenly disappear
  • People start abusing their powers
  • Someone figures out how to steal powers
  • A hierarchy of strong vs. weak powers develops, creating superiority/inferiority dynamics
  • Someone is born without a superpower

There are many more possibilities I didn’t even think of here, but any one (or more) of these could become a plot. Choose one that sounds interesting, and then ask yourself “and then what?” 

Say I choose: Someone figures out how to steal powers. Then what does that person do? Do they recruit people to do the dirty work for them? Do they work alone? Do they hoard these powers and barter them for other goods? Do they attempt to enslave people? Do they attempt to take control of institutions? What do they do?

Your goal is to take your ideas and turn them into actions taken by characters. People doing things. And each piece you add will usually lead into another. If you went with the idea that this character is stealing powers and essentially selling them for other goods, you’d have to ask yourself follow-up questions. First, who are they selling to? Why would anyone buy a new superpower if they already have one? What uses would they have for additional ones? What is the key demographic that this person is trying to reach? Secondly, what are they selling them in exchange for? Money? Favors? Souls? What is this character getting in return?

Now that you’ve examined potential actions that the character takes, you’ve also exposed potential new characters. 

  • People they’re stealing from
  • People they’re bargaining with
  • People that try to police these crimes
  • People that try to copy this character’s process

At the beginning of this section, I talked about using “what could go right” as another optional jumping off point. This is a good path to follow if your concept is already really negative. For a concept where someone is killing people for some pointed reason, you might ask “what could go right” and explore ideas where the killer is caught and brought to justice. 

The point of all this is to think about change as a means of taking your idea from concept to plot. A concept is static - it doesn’t move, evolve, or change. By developing a plot, you’re forcing the concept to be challenged in some way. If you think about it that way, you’ll be able to formulate conflicts, and the people that orchestrate and fight against those conflicts. 

On that note, I think we’re ready to move onto the third piece of my graphic above. 

  • Plot = Character Actions and Consequences

At this point, you have sketches for characters. You’ve got this nameless, faceless person that is stealing the powers, and all these other nameless, faceless people that I listed above. In essence, we have character concepts. And just like we turned our initial concept into a plot, we have to turn these character concepts into actual characters. 

The basics are the easiest way to start. You figure out their name, their gender identity, their age, their appearance, some brief backstory and personality traits. I personally prefer the simplest questionnaire that I put together back in the early days because it hits on the poignant pieces of a character without overwhelming you with 100s of questions. 

Now that you’ve given your character concepts names and faces and potential behaviors, you start to consider how one character’s view of the world inspires them to take certain actions, and you then think about how those actions affect your entire story. 

We already kind of talked about the motives of the power thief in our example, but definitely delve deep here. On the surface, this character seems bad - stealing from people and then selling what they steal. But depending on what it is they’re getting in return, could we not argue that this character is a supernatural Robin Hood? Maybe instead of selling, they’re giving, and maybe the characters they’re stealing powers from are people that abuse and misuse their powers. Character motives can take a plot and turn it on its head, forcing you to reconceptualize everything. And that’s okay! That’s part of the process.

But separate from that idea, if we have a character concept of someone whose powers were stolen, and after developing their basic backstory, we discover that person’s name is Rose, and she has an especially close relationship with her brother. So when her powers are stolen, how does this affect her life? Was she using her powers to keep her brother alive and protected? What she using them to keep a roof over their heads? Was she using them as part of her job, as a means of providing? What happens to her life when her powers are stolen? And what will Rose do about it? Whatever Rose does will impact the story. If she does nothing to get her powers back, how does she solve her problems and does that make for a good story? If she does decide to act, then you’ve moved onto a new plot point to dive deeper into.

My point is, character concepts come from plots, but characters themselves often create plot, as their decisions and mistakes and successes create new outcomes. So if I could modify my original flow chart:

Before you develop something, you conceptualize it. You have a concept, then you make it a plot. You have concepts for characters, then you make them characters. And those characters end up driving your plot, to the point that this happens:

Plot inspires character. Character inspires plot. And it just keeps going around and around and around. Breaking it down into these pieces helps organize the process, but developing a story is rarely this neat and tidy. You’ll get ideas that don’t make sense, ideas that aren’t cohesive, characters you don’t need, characters that piss you off, problems you can’t solve, or plot points you’ve committed to that you no longer like…it will be messy. But it’s your mess, and the more you work on developing your own process, the more it’ll make sense to you. And it’ll become easier to know how to go about fixing it when something’s not right. 

Have fun with this process! It’s supposed to be fun. When the pieces start to become clearer, you’re able to put them together in a rough outline. And once you have a rough outline, you can start writing, and really see it take shape. 

-Rebekah

People always want to make noise about not romanticizing jd/veronica, but nobody wants to comment on how much the fandom romanticizes chansaw, which is much more abusive.

She physically assaults Veronica, cuts her off from her friends, threatens her if she doesn’t do exactly what she wants, and humiliates her (among other things). Like, y’all do whatever you want, but don’t act like a gay ship is inherently better than a straight ship or vice versa

I’m tired.

Fun! Haikyuu!! Asks

Kageyama: How do you feel about milk and what is your favorite kind?

Hinata: What is your “bathroom”? (Place you run into people you don’t want to see the most)

Tsukishima: How do you feel about dinosaurs?

Yamaguchi: Name you say most often?

Tanaka: How often do you try to intimidate someone or go looking for a fight?

Noya: Do you have any special moves?

Ennoshita: Are you the only responsible person in your group?

Suga: How much sass do you exude?

Daichi: Are you the parent friend of the group?

Asahi: Ponytail, bun or headband?

Kiyoko: How often do you beat off adoring fans?

Yachi: What do you overact about the most?

Kuroo: What kind of nerd are you?

Kenma: Favourite video game platform?

Lev: Do/would you try to pet stray cats?

Taketora: Are you a bro type of friend?

Inuoka: What makes you excited?

Bokuto: What are you the greatest at?

Akaashi: Prettiest person you know?

Yukie: Do you love eating?

Konoha: Nickname you hate?

Komi: How loud of a person are you?

Oikawa: Do you believe in aliens?

Iwaizumi: How athletic are you?

Kyotani: Are you a dog person?

Terushima: Do you like to party?

Aone: Would you sit next to someone scary looking on a train?

Ushijima: Who needs to go to your school?

Tendou: What kind of “monster” are you?

Shirabu: Who would you do anything for?

Goshiki: Tell me about your dream!

Second part here!

(I’ve been seeing some fandom asks floating around and decided to make some Haikyuu!! ones. A lot of these are only minimally related to the characters, but I wanted these to be fun and lighthearted.
I’m working on serious Haikyuu!! Asks where I will do every character from each team, so if your favourite isn’t here, just wait!)

Also! I will be sending asks to the first 26 people (probably more) that reblog this to get the fun started! :)

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Faith + the world

What I love more than anything about Brooklyn Nine-Nine is how nice all the characters are. And we’re always told that nice = boring, but they’re not boring at all, even though they’d do absolutely anything for each other. I mean Gina’s the meanest character on there and she’d still give her friends her own liver if they needed it, she’d just criticise them really inventively while she did it.

Maybe other shows that think they need to make their characters dark and edgy to attract an audience should consider just becoming better writers?

More Feysand cause I want to improve my concept of both of them (plus I’ve wanted to draw this scene since the moment I read it); I’ll probably be doing a character portrait for each of them soon-ish too :D

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Creating Likeable Characters

Sometimes it’s difficult to make your characters likeable as they are tested and are pushed to further and further lengths. Sometimes they have to make hard decisions, and sometimes the pressure gets to them and they mess up, hurt another character or an innocent bystander. How can you keep them likeable throughout the whole plotline?

- Keep their motivations pure.
It almost always comes back to the heart – if their heart is pure, and that’s established early-on, the audience is more likely to root for them.

- Give them flaws – make them human.
Not every character has to have some huge problem, like an addiction or a traumatic past or a disability – if your entire cast does, it’s no problem, but it’s not necessary. But every character has to have some flaw(s), whether it’s cheating at card games because he can’t stand to lose or being too-closed minded or closing off when she gets too emotional. If your character doesn’t have a flaw, they start to come off as too perfect, too angelic, pretentious.

- Give them permission to mess up.
This ties in with flaws – if your character is inclined to make a bad decision at any point in the plot, don’t steer him away from it because “oh no he’s my protagonist and he must be Good and Whole and Pure and All-Knowing”. Let him walk into that ambush despite the sick feeling in his stomach and get half his army killed; let her rush into a confrontation with a bully and get into a fight with another girl who has a switchblade. Let your characters mess up – it shows that they’re human.

- But if your character messes up, let them own up to it eventually.
The general who killed half his army by ignoring the unease in the back of his mind might cry over their makeshift graves long after the rest of the platoon is asleep; the girl sitting in the infirmary might feel remorse for knocking her opponent’s block off. Or your characters might argue and might be stubborn and might not apologize for weeks. But let them apologize eventually. This goes back to the heart, and what the character knows is right.

- Relationships with other characters are vital.
That’s not to say a loner character can’t be likeable – but the audience’s perception of a loner character is determined by the thoughts/words of other characters. Characters all color each other and define parts of each other, just like people do to each other in real life. If your character is a jerk to other characters and other characters don’t like him (especially if the characters who dislike him are likeable), the audience won’t like him either. The character’s image depends not just on himself, but on his supporting cast.

Hope this helps! - @authors-haven

The worst thing you can do with two characters is make them hate each other and then slowly turn their animosity into 👀. I will immediately ship that shit.

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Three hours to make everything up. Make-up, dress, everything. Three hours preparation every day.

I think each actor has to do his private dreams about the character. I felt she was sad about the human being. She was….disappointed. She was giving the love, maybe because she didn’t have for her…I don’t know. I felt like sad character. The Blue was a…I don’t know it means a lot for me.

I give so many time, so many energy into this character, that when I discover the movie with the scene that he (Luc Besson) choose, I was a bit disappointed because it goes too fast. When I saw the movie I thought “Oh, the people are not going to see me. They are not gonna see my work. Maybe they don’t know how much time I spent for the character.” Then I saw on the internet so many sites about the Diva. “Is she strange? Because the movie doesn’t give any attention of the character.” That’s why I was so impressed when you asked me to do an interview about my character.    - Maïwenn discussing her role as the Diva Plavalaguna

The Ultimate Edition of The Fifth Element includes the entire opera sequence that was shot against a green screen.

Blue Exorcist timeline

Information gathered from: Chapter 87, 86, 78, 76, 75, 74, 39, 10, a shit ton of theories when what book was written and when what thing was built, the wikia, Wikipedia, my shitty math skills, assuming time periods by staring too long at chapter 86, researching school starts and breaks in Japan, the drama Faust which I reread twice for Blue Exorcist, some more manga chapters and finally two  posts by @duskwitch about the age of the Ba’al!

Also, as duskwitch informed me, there is a poster in chapter 45 stating it’s the year 201X. For the sake of actual dates though, I used 2009 as the present because it’s the year Blue Exorcist got published.

This could be more detailed probably but I’m not gonna search through every panel of the manga now. Maybe next weekend though and then add whatever else I find. It’s a work in progress! Now then, let’s get started:

38.000 BC [first cave drawing]: Creation of the concept of Ba’als; all demons perhaps?
2300 BC [Tower of Babel] to 100 AD [bible]: Ba’als gained defined appearances; some time later first incarnated. Lucifer incarnated and died first after about 10 years.
9th to 10th century: Samael takes up the name of Loki
1000 AD: Amaimon’s first incarnation
Middle Ages: Lucifer convinces his siblings to fight against humanity
12th to 13th century [Order of the Temple]: Samael and some of the Ba’al (two others pictured) gave humans the knowledge on how to fight against demons; Beginning of True Cross Order
18th/19th century: Samael joins the order and takes on the name “Mephisto Pheles”. Assumed years by significant days for the drama Faust: 1772–1775, 1788–1790, 1797–1805, 1825–1831
Start 20th century: Mephisto tries to convince Lucifer to not blow up Earth; establishing of Section 13/Asylum
20th century: birth of Amaimon’s current body with adapting the clones of the 3rd strongest Ba’al
8th August 1982: Shura Birth
1991: Shura gets taken in by Shirou for about one to two years
March 1993: Gehenna itself incarnated/Satan gains an “Ego”; Blue Night; Research facility destroyed; Lucifer goes off on his own
27th December 1993: Rin and Yukio Okumura birth; death of Yuri Egin (which I don’t believe until you show me a body)
2000: Shirou tells Shura to live her life
March 2009: Shirou dies; age 45
1st April 2009: Start of True Cross Academy Arc
Start of summer break 2009: Training Camp Arc
Summer 2009: Kyoto Arc and Terror of Kraken Arc
8th August 2009: Shura turns 27
Autumn 2009: True Cross Festival Arc and Illuminati Arc
Autumn 2009: Exorcist Exam Arc
Winter/November/December 2009: Aomori Arc
December 2009: Lightning and Bon get information about the Ba’al from Mephisto apparently called ”Blue Night Investigation Arc”
27th December 2009: Twins turn 16

That’s one for Dazatsu!

I just saw someone make a bungou stray dogs personality type match. I’m a big fan of personality types, a proud infp myself. Dazai turns out to be an intj(no real surprise) and Atsushi is an infp(yay!)

For those who aren’t really aware of personality types let me give you a quick breakdown before I start ranting (if you do know this stuff you can skip).

Dazai is an INTJ which is Introverted Intuitive Thinking Judging. The first thing that can be used to describe an INTJ is “It’s lonely at the top, and being one of the rarest and most strategically capable personality types” (talk about taking Oda’s words right out of his mouth). Seriously though like INTJ’s are like wicked smart and are one of the rarest personality types out there. They radiate self-confidence and an aura of mystery, and their insightful observations, original ideas and formidable logic enable them to push change through with sheer willpower and force of personality. They can be arrogant (Chuuya: Arrogant doesn’t even begin to describe it!), loathe places with many rules and regulations (reason why he didn’t want to work with the government) and let’s just say that they aren’t too big with emotions. Not that they don’t have them, they define themselves with logic so feeling is kind of their downfall.

Atsushi now, my sweet cinnamon roll is an INFP, Introverted Intuitive Feeling Perceptive. INFPs are known as the true idealist and will try to find the tiniest hint of good in even the worst of people. “INFPs are led by the purity of their intent, not rewards and punishments. People who share the INFP personality type are proud of this quality, and rightly so, but not everyone understands the drive behind these feelings”  They are open-minded and do not like being constricted by rules, very passionate (but their shyness tends to keep them from speaking up too often), hardworking and likes to give the benefit of the doubt. Although they can be too idealistic, take things personally and too Altruistic as they try to push themselves to commit to a chosen cause or person, forgetting to take care of the needs of others in their lives, and especially themselves. 

Whew now that I’m done explaining that, what does all this have to with DazAtsu. FuFuFu. It has everything to do with it. The INFP and INTJ don’t seem that compatible seeing that one replies more on thinking and one on feeling but in real life it’s a really popular pair and not just romantically but platonically. INFPs and INTJs are naturally drawn to each other and form some of the greatest friendships and marriages. “INTJ-INFP relationships are common because these types complement each other so well. Both INTJs and INFPs enjoy abstract discussions, including potential ways of improving the world. INFPs are great listeners and enjoy taking in new ideas and information.”  It’s like this just verify everything we said from the beginning Dazai and Atsushi complete each other. Atsushi really listens to Dazai not because he has to but because he wants to and is really curious about what Dazai has to say. Dazai also has a lot of faith in Atsushi and is also interested in Atsushi in his own way. 

Like look at this scene it always gets me because of Dazai’s straight face but the way he pets Atsushi its like his emotions are  seeping through and then that tiny smile from the weretiger. Watching these two interact is like the highlight of my day sometimes. They just seem so perfect for each other sometimes and knowing that they are actually people like them in real life that live a happy life together just makes my go ahhhhh! They were made for each other.


PS. If you don’t know your personality type I recommend you take the test on 16personalities. It’s really fun!

luluherondale  asked:

Hi, Cassie! I'm from Brazil and we love you so much here! Your books are very important for me. Well, I was wondering... the characters of TLH, the young ones, do they know each other? They act like a huge family or just... know each other names? It's a little weird: I badly know them, but I already love them. Kisses from Brazil!

The characters of The Last Hours are in general extremely close. Some are obviously closer than others (Matthew and James are parabatai, and they’re also unbreakable friends with Christopher and Thomas; Lucie and Cordelia are BFF) Anna, Alastair and Charles are a little older than the others, so sometimes take big-brother/big-sister roles with them; little Alex is only three and doesn’t get out much — but in general I’d say they’re a tight-knit group who’ve grown up together. The only exception might be the Blackthorns, who have grown up in Idris (well, Jesse hasn’t exactly “grown up’ at all) and are fairly separated from the others.

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Community + text posts: the best of Annie Edison