doctors case

  • Steven Moffat: Bill being gay only comes up when it’s relevant.
  • The Pilot: For instance, when she randomly tells a story about a crush, seconds into the episode.
  • The Pilot: When someone makes a remark about guys.
  • The Pilot: When a love story starts to develop.
  • The Pilot: ...oh, that's ALSO this week's plot.
  • The Pilot: ...AND the resolution of the episode.
  • The Pilot: Travelling with the Doctor, she might meet Heather again.
  • Steven Moffat: Like I said, only when it's relevant.

A doodle of a Dab for all your fast dabs needs

Space Australian Medicine

Despite the best efforts of everyone involved, something truly nasty escaped Earth. They call it giardia, a microscopic organism that their Planetary Protection Officer called “pretty dumb” and “not too bad, really, a week of digestive upset and then it’s over.”

Yes, Earth has a Planetary Protection Officer. They have a Planetary Protection Office, and have had one since they were sending probes around their own solar system. Doctor Ma-et had found it a bit silly, like a child concerned about the cleanliness of their toys, until she learned that the job of the Planetary Protection Office had always been protecting other worlds from Earth.

Keep reading

I got a new camera case.

Figured it needed some decoration… now, it’s like a Where’s Waldo for you, but instead of Waldo you’re finding the Scooby-Doo sticker:

I’m mighty happy with how it’s turning out… oh, and for extra credit, the R&M fans will appreciate the other…

subtly familiar

…stickers I got for the car.

Hopefully one day, someone out there – probably stuck in traffic – will get a nice chuckle out of them.

–Colin

Of course it’s unhealthy to be fat.

If you’re fat, you’re going to have a rough time getting health insurance. You probably won’t get regular checkups and preventive care, and any health problems you might have (completely unrelated to your weight) will be a lot worse whenever you finally do see a doctor.

Even if you have health coverage, you probably avoid going to the doctor if you’re fat. So you’re in the same situation. Why do you avoid going to the doctor? Every time you walk into a doctor’s office, the first thing they want you to do is step on a scale. Then you get the lecture, or the belittling remark, or worse, the weight loss advice. You figure, as long as you feel okay, why risk it? You don’t pay for abuse in any other setting, right? You value your mental health, so you stay away.

If you’re fat and you do visit the doctor, he or she might decide to treat your weight, rather than your symptoms. You get a diet, rather than a diagnosis. The doctor says all your ills are caused by your fat. Six months later, you still have sharp pains in your heel or nasal congestion or shooting lights in your vision. So you find a new doctor. This time you actually get treatment for your plantar fasciitis or your sinus infection or your brain tumor. (These examples are based on actual cases.)

Your doctor may not like fat people. A recent study found that fat women are a third less likely to get breast exams, gynecologic exams, or Pap smears. An exception: Fat and thin women get mammograms equally often. (The authors said that doctors may do exams more readily if they don’t have to touch fat patients.) Fat women are at increased risk for certain scary cancers (breast, cervical, endometrial, ovarian). Getting less preventive care, researchers concluded, may “exacerbate or even account for” this increased risk. It’s not the fat that kills us, it’s the fat hatred.

— 

But What About Your Health?

By Marilyn Wann

From Fat!So? Because You Don’t Have to Apologize For Your Size

5

David Tennant’s Contributions to Doctor Who Episodes
“Hand in a Jar” Edition

From the DVD commentary for Utopia with David Tennant and Russell T Davies:

David Tennant: The hand in the jar there is actually a cast of my hand.

Russell T Davies: At last!

DT: At last!  Which we did just before this episode, because the hand that you’d had on Torchwood and elsewhere had been… I don’t know who it had been.

RTD: I used to know who it was. It’s one of the Millennium FX guys.

DT: One of the Millennium FX guys’ hands.

RTD: I can’t remember which one

DT: It was a good bit bigger than mine. And when you put that in water it looked bigger still!  

RTD: [laughter] 

DT: So I thought, if my hand’s going to be right next to it I think we might need to address that.

RTD: Oh, did you ask?

DT: Yeah!  Yeah, yeah… and they ignored me for about three weeks, and then I said, “Please!” So we did it about two days before…

RTD: [more laughter]

Orig.Poster’s note: This post is part of a series on some of the contributions that David made to episodes of Doctor Who, because he sometimes gets questions about ad-libs or input he may have had to episodes, but he tends to not take credit for his various additions/suggestions - so I figured I’d list some for him.   David’s hands are quite distinctive.  With his extraordinarily long, thin fingers it was quite noticeable (to those paying close attention - and to those who are fans of David’s hands) that the original hand-in-a-jar didn’t look much like David’s hand. I find it impressive that it was David himself who kindly asked (multiple times) if a cast could be made of his actual hand, so the hand-in-the-jar would be more believable & accurate.  I’m thankful for his attention to detail and his desire to get things just right.

Semi-related Bonus (from Turn Left’s Confidential Episode):

Full set of David’s Contributions Posts (tag):
Bigger on the Inside Edition
Walking on Theatre Chairs Edition
Scanning a Planet Edition
Shakespeare Code Bedroom Edition
Interrupting Jackie Edition
Sarah Jane Smith Edition
Stone Arm Edition
Hand in a Jar Edition
Killing the Vespiform Edition

I just viewed a post that was blocked for sensitive content on my dash, and it turned out to be….the Ninth Doctor and Rose Tyler holding hands at the beginning of Father’s Day.  I mean…I get it, tumblr, the Doctor and Rose holding hands is definitely sensitive content that could be considered sexual in any context.

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10

“It’s the oldest story in the universe, this one or any other. Girl and girl fall in love, get separated by events. War, politics, accidents in time. She’s thrown out of the hex, or she’s thrown into it. Since then, they’ve been yearning for each other across time and space, across dimensions.

This isn’t a ghost story, it’s a love story!

The fundamental misunderstanding of the state in which Heather exists in after she becomes ‘the pilot’ is what drives the conflict in this episode, but it’s made abundantly clear that she is not dead.

When they meet in the park outside the Doctor’s study, Bill, seeing her in this new form, mutters “you’re dead!”, which is repeated back to her by Heather’s mimicry - the clear intention here (supported by Lawrence Gough’s brilliant directing style) being to establish the misunderstanding of her being ‘the monster’ while playing it off as a ‘horror’ moment. But, in classic Moffat fashion, the entire point of this episode is to subvert that idea.

I really have to praise Stephanie Hyam’s performance here because it’s key to understanding that Heather’s pursuit of Bill across time and space was something that she was directing. Notice how much emotion appears on Heather’s face whenever she catches up to Bill - she looks extremely sad when she appears in the Doctor’s study (see the fourth image above) and Bill gets in the TARDIS because that’s exactly why she’s here… to fulfill her promise to Bill that she won’t leave without her.

She appears positively elated to see Bill when they travel several million years into the future and cross to the other side of the universe, as her face emerges out of the water. There’s multiple occasions where Bill has a flashback to their time together earlier in the episode and we’re meant to think that it’s her remembering the girl that was before she became this creature, playing to a rather typical trope in how horror films are directed. But it’s actually establishing the opposite, as Bill slowly pieces together the reason why this is happening and realises that this has been Heather all along.

Perhaps the most obvious clue is given to us in how Heather assumes the form of a Dalek that’s trying to kill the Doctor. A Dalek! The Doctor wonders why she didn’t fire on them. She had a gun, after all - “the deadliest fire in the universe”, a Dalek’s weapon.

But she doesn’t use it…

Face-to-face, at last, she affirms her feelings towards Bill when she’s told “I really liked you”. Hyam’s performance here is just brilliant because she’s obviously having to mimic what Bill says, but you can distinctly hear the tone of sadness in her voice as she says the line back to her because this is where they part ways.

And she extends another offer to Bill, showing her what she’s become - how she sees the universe differently now, and all of time and space. And Bill is enraptured with it, but releases Heather from her promise because she’s (naturally) scared. Things still aren’t totally clear: she doesn’t know or understand what she’ll become if she accepts this offer because Heather isn’t totally human any more, but, as we’ve seen time and time again throughout the episode, right up to this moment, she’s still Heather.

The end of The Pilot has two rather important moments regarding the episode’s narrative arc with Heather. Back in the Doctor’s study, Bill asks if she’ll ever see Heather again, to which the Doctor rather cynically responds “I don’t see how”.

But, after Bill calls him out on the mind wipe situation and he’s reminded of Clara - who he’s very clearly still yearning to find - he shows up outside the university in the TARDIS and tells Bill:

“It’s a big universe. Perhaps, one day, we’ll find her…”

I can’t for the life of me find the quote, but, some months ago, Moffat said that there’s a very particular story they have in-mind to tell with Bill. I definitely don’t want Pearl to leave after one series, but it seems like a distinct possibility with the handover to Chibnall ushering in the next era of the show…

As such, I can sort of see how Bill’s story could potentially end if she’s only going to be in Series 10 and won’t carry over into the Chibnall era.

Similar to how Clara and Ashildr ended up with their own TARDIS and went off together to travel in time and space, Heather has her own time travel capabilities and Bill is clearly hoping that, in travelling with the Doctor, they will find each other again.

Naturally, that sets the stage nicely for Bill to continue travelling after her time as the companion is done with her new cosmic girlfriend.