doctoral program

What is sleep? (Baby don’t snooze me)

We love to think that we’re a rough and ready race (Hence the space-orcs name). The truth is, we’re big softies. Our environment is so incredibly kind to us, that we’re literally soft! We have no innate armour, little in the way of weaponry, and spend 1/3 of our time borderline unconscious, because we can.For most aliens, sleep simply doesn’t happen. You live, you fight, you die. This can lead to some awkward office conversations:Vultaire (Alien exchange student): Time to clock off for the day. What are you doing after class?
Charles (Human doctoral student): I’ve been crashing on my lab-partner’s couch whilst my home’s been renovated after The Accident™. It’s ready to live in again, so I’m off to buy a new bed this evening!
Vultaire: Crashing? I didn’t realise you were cybernetic. Let me recommend my debugger to you, he’s very good!
Charles: No cybernetics here, I just mean sleep. I forget that you’re still learning the language. Here, let me show you what I’m getting.
*Proceeds to show Vultaire pictures of luscious beds draped in colourful fabrics and peaceful people*

Vultaire: You’re…. dying?

Charles: No?! Why would you think that?

Vultaire: But those are funeral processions, I’ve seen them before. Why would you do that if you’re not dying?

Charles: *Laughing* Not funeral processions, but it’s pretty funny when you say it that way. It’s just for sleeping, resting, recuperating energy through the night. What do you do when you’re not here?

Vultaire: Go home and keep working. We don’t do this.. sleep thing *Scribbles in behavioural notebook*

Charles: Have you ever considered following the doctoral program? You’d be perfect for it…


Initial idea by freakinafishtank

ahumanlady  asked:

Hey! This is such a helpful account! :) do you have: A)a new heart wrenching angst? B) pining Viktor? C) college au? I've read most of the ones on your lists...whoops.

I LOVE COLLEGE AUs OMG thank you for this request! (For @ahumanlady: you can find all my angst fic rec lists here!)

Originally posted by nikforovs


College AU


centripetal force by braveten, Explicit, 60k (WIP)
Victor speaks seven languages. (Physics isn’t one of them.) Luckily, though, he ends up rooming with his antithesis: a shy, black-haired boy who just so happens to be a physics major. LOVE this!

Perfect harmony by BlessTheBeast, Teen, 3.9k
Phichit drags Yuuri along to a party, where Yuuri promptly gets shitfaced and enthusiastically seduces Viktor, then dies of embarrassment, which seems to be inevitable in any universe these two idiots end up in. I AM IN LOVE WITH THIS FIC

Russian for Dummies by cutthroatpixie, Gen, 2.4k
“Are you a beginner?” Viktor was not a beginner. Viktor was the TA supposedly in charge of this study session. Viktor spoke Russian. Viktor was Russian. “Sure!” OMG SO CUTE

Essays and Endearments by kaizuka, Teen, 13k
A guide to romance by Katsuki Yuuri: pine after your nameless classmate for almost the entirety of one semester. Do not make eye contact, ever. Go to class, and if the stars align, it will be cancelled, and your crush will be waiting to endure your awkward attempt at small talk. THIS IS SO GOOD! Must read!

Slavonic Studies by thepossessedfangirl, Explicit, 9.4k (WIP)
Yuuri sleeps with a hot stranger the night before university begins but surprise, surprise. JUST READ THIS YOU CAN THANK ME LATER

It Doesn’t Have to be a Lie by Recesskup, Not Rated, 54k (WIP)
The pretend relationship AU where Yuuri is a shy Dance Major and Viktor is the attractive, outgoing Art/Photography Major and Phichit is the worst wingman ever. This is great!!

Kiss Me and Tell Me That I’ll See You Again by probablytooobsessedwithfiction, Teen, 19k (WIP)
When Yuuri is dragged to a party by his best friend Yuko, he doesn’t want to be there- that is until he finds himself making out with someone. The only problem is that he has no idea who he’s kissing. SLOW BURN BUT SO GOOD

Thoughtfulness at the Drama Club by MattLightwood (TanyaHarries), Gen, 2.1k
Viktor is in his last year of college and as a president of the drama club when his secretary resigns. With this place vacant, the club finds itself in big trouble until Phichit appears one day with someone that could save them… and steal Viktor’s heart. Thumbs up!

Break the Cycle by SigmundFreud, Explicit, 26k
College AU where ex boyfriends Yuuri and Victor can’t stay away from each other. LOTS of mutual pining, arguments, miscommunication, and, of course, angst. Thumbs up!

Yes, Professor? by AwkwardPotatoChild, Teen, 15k (WIP)
“Good morning! I’m Professor Viktor Nikiforov! I look forward to being with you all this semester.” Dammit! No one told me he had an accent too! And to think this was all started because I wanted some pudding! So cute!

Have You Heard? by QueenofFennoscandia, Teen,  4.7k
According to rumors, Viktor Nikiforov had been seen crying in the E building’s staircase. No one really seemed to know what was the reason, but everyone were terribly curious about it. Bonus long-haired Victor!

I will break the ice of your heart by Madlymiho, Explicit, 26k (WIP)
Yuuri is a talented but very shy student who enters in a new university for his last year. There, he meets a coldhearted and strict philosophy teacher: Viktor Nikiforov. Despite their differences, the two of them start to get closer… Thumbs up!

A Skating Scholarship by Viktorsfeet, Teen, 35k
After turning 17 and being offered a scholarship in Detroit, Yuuri packs his bags and moves across the world to pursue his skating. He can’t help but find the second-year student Viktor Nikiforov fascinating and his roommate helps him to find out more. Lovely fic!

the golden hour by wynsolstice, Teen, 7k
The photographer blinked at him before smiling brightly. Without warning, he grabbed Yuuri by the hand. His skin was smooth, and very, very warm. Biting his lip, Yuuri glanced up at him. “C'mon,” the photographer urged. “Let’s get out of this rain. I’ll treat you to coffee to make up for taking your picture and scaring you.” SO ADORABLE

Just Ice Skatey Things by personafreak, Explicit, 24k (WIP)
Victor is an eccentric foreigner revolutionizing the figure skating world, and Yuuri is just trying to survive his part-time job at the ice skating rink. Awesome college fic!

A Marriage of True Minds by Pilomela, Teen, 20k (WIP)
After his application to the doctoral program was rejected due to his incomplete entrance essay, Yuuri Katsuki scores a job running a small local bookstore. Rec’d by a follower!

anonymous asked:

Hey Shychemist. I've been following your blog for awhile and I want to bring up something that seems dated but nonetheless holds to be accurate today. I feel like the girls who consider themselves to be on the science side of tumblr to be horribly mistaken. It's statistically proven that women applicants struggle to get into stem doctorate programs, and rightfully so, they don't belong there. examples- atomic-o-licious, brainsx , adventuresinchemistry, i can't fit anymore but you get it

It doesn’t seem dated, your attitude is dated. This is the 21st century.

Women deserve to be in STEM programs just as much as men. I’d wager they deserve to succeed in the Sciences even more than men because of the sexism and misogyny they experience.

They struggle to get in because they’re the minority, and a lot of people who could admit them are sexist (regardless of gender) because of the society they grew up in. Its not through any intellectual weakness. These women are amazing and just as smart as the men in their fields.

You have no right to say these things to these amazing women, many of whom I consider to be friends.

Admission #218: Use That Line
  • Me at the airport counter: Could I have my seat switched somewhere further up?
  • Counter guy: I have one seat, emergency row. Could you perform the necessary duties and responsibilities in the event of an emergency?
  • Me: Yes. Trust me, I'm a doctor.
  • Counter guy: Legally, I have to ask everyone but that's also very cool.
  • (I realize then what I said and died on the inside)
huffingtonpost.com
Doctors want to learn about trans healthcare but lack the training, study shows
Transgender patients, meanwhile, have serious complaints with the care they receive.

A groundbreaking survey was released last week. Developed by the Mayo Clinic and Endocrine Society, it’s the first-ever report measuring American doctors’ “confidence levels and willingness to treat transgender patients.”

It’s a well-known fact that transgender people face huge disparities in healthcare access, from being mistreated or misgendered to not having access to any health services at all. Not surprisingly, the survey of more than 400 clinicians and program directors found that most hormone doctors – 81% – had never received any kind of training on treating trans patients. 

Among program directors, 72 percent said they provide some kind of education on transgender health topics, and 94 percent said this training is important. However, the program directors said they struggled to educate their fellows on these issues because they don’t have enough experienced faculty to teach the subject. […]

Of the minority of doctors who said they did receive training, only 4 percent said they got it during medical school, while only 7 percent said they were trained during their residency. The majority of teachers who received specialization got it during their endocrinology fellowship (58 percent), while 53 percent learned more at local, national or international meetings.

Obviously, a lack of training is no excuse for treating a transgender patient with disrespect (or worse). As more and more trans people come out and seek medically necessary, sometimes life-saving healthcare, it is a doctor’s responsibility to know what steps to take to help, and to take those steps with compassion. It’s time for med schools, residency programs, and doctors who don’t think before they speak to get with the picture. 

Decided to accept my seat at University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine’s Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine program class of 2021 :)

vergess  asked:

Have you ever written a similar post about disabled people and the holocaust? If you have, I haven't seen it, and I was just wondering if I missed it or if it ended up not happening on account of being such a tall order.

  1. I have written a lot of commentary about disabled people and the Holocaust, yeah. It may be scattered across many posts, but I can give you a short list of highlights:
  2. T4, the Nazi “euthanization” program, was literally where the Commandant of Treblinka figured out how to kill large numbers of people at a time
  3. Hans Asperger (as in Asperger’s Syndrome) deliberately mis-represented how autism/Asperger’s Syndrome manifested and what its ‘value’ is. The repercussions of this are felt by autistic people to this day. (see: Neurotribes, which details the direct links between Hans Asperger and today’s autism movement and the misconception of autism as a curable disease.)
  4. Since blindness and deafness were considered executable conditions, the D/deaf culture in Nazi-occupied territories, and other subcultures/cultures suffered immensely.
  5. About 200K people were murdered, including people who were starved to death and infants who were killed by starvation or IV drugs.
  6. We were literally called ‘life unworthy of life,’ a mentality which continues to present times. (See: Me Before You and other ‘better dead than alive’ disability snuff bullshit.)
  7. 350K or more women were sterilized (men were not counted) to prevent them from reproducing, because they were ‘likely’ to give birth to defective children. This included D/deaf, blind, epileptics, autistics, and even those who had alcoholic relatives.
  8. There was a public protest and then the program was moved out of public view.
  9. 14f13 was a program which was used to ‘weed out’ those already in camps who were ‘unfit for work,’ and is an example of intersectionality between other groups (Jews, Rroma, LGBTQIPA, Poles, German dissidents) and the disabled. Those who were briefly screened by doctors under this ‘program’ were taken out of work camps and sent to death camps because they were disabled.
  10. Do not think the US was free from blame here. During this time period several states, I know Indiana was one, had laws that made it possible to sterilize ‘the unfit’ without their consent.

Here are some links for your further reading and watching. All of them come with trigger warnings, obviously. Maybe at some point when I’m not so … upset… I can write another post. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCHjik64t5w

https://www.ushmm.org/research/research-in-collections/search-the-collections/bibliography/people-with-disabilities (contains a large bibliography for further reading)

https://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007683

http://www.theholocaustexplained.org/ks3/life-in-nazi-occupied-europe/non-jewish-minorities/disabled/

http://fcit.usf.edu/Holocaust/people/VICTHAND.htm LOTS of resources including a lot on the D/deaf community

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/disabled.html

http://ww2history.com/key_moments/Holocaust/Hitler_authorizes_killing_of_disabled

i dont think ill have the spoons this month to make a post for him, but for black history month: 

andrew foster was the first black person to graduate from gallaudet college (now university) and he was accepted with a full scholarship, and graduated with a bachelors in arts, then later earned 2 masters at 2 different colleges. 

he founded the christian mission for the deaf and went on to create over 40 deaf schools in africa, where when he first arrived to do so in 1957 there were only 12, spread throughout the entire continent. 

he has received many awards and recognitions, including an honorary doctorate, and a grant program in his name for black deaf gallaudet students. gallaudet called him “the father of deaf education in africa” and the national black deaf association presented gallaudet with a statue of him, which was the first time a black deaf person was ever honored

anonymous asked:

Why do u fight w everyone Seymour. Do u need me to find a doctor or anger management program for u? It's not good for ur health

Gerold Leave Me Im Having Dark Night Of The Soul Now Let Me Be

this is why the new ticket system is bumming me (and a lot of other swifties) out

1. I’ve pre-ordered 3 albums (1 through iTunes, 2 through Target)

2. I’ve ordered a t-shirt

3. I’ve shared via social media

4. I’ve watched the lyric video a GAZILLION times

and yet my place in line hasn’t budged.

I’m a graduate student in a doctorate program and I do not have the time/money to spend hours upon end on the site and ordering merchandise in hopes of getting the opportunity to buy Reputation Tour tickets. I want more than anything to be able to attend this tour with my sister, like we have done for the past 2 tours…but I’m afraid that we won’t have the same opportunities based on financial limitations.

i know a lot of you are worried about this new system as well. let’s REBLOG and TAG @taylorswift so she hears us loud and clear!!!!

@taylorswift HELP US

I just realized you could have been in your freshman year of college when Louis last tweeted Harry and graduated now. You could have been pregnant when Louis last tweeted Harry and have a walking talking baby now. You could have gone through your entire doctoral program. You could have served your entire time in the military. I remember exactly where I was the last time Louis tweeted Harry, and I can’t believe how much has changed in my life …. except my love for them ♥️♥️♥️♥️

The Clinical Psychology Megapost, Or: What Is A Clinical Psychologist And How Do I Become One?

What’s a clinical psychologist?

A clinical psychologist* is a person with a clinical psychology PhD or PsyD. Typically clinical psychologists focus on topics associated with mental health or psychopathology in any group, including children, people with chronic health conditions, older adults, forensic populations, families, people living in poverty, students, and people with developmental disabilities, among others. Often clinical psychologists work within mental health systems to improve care or other outcomes among people with mental health issues.

(*Although many of these things will apply internationally, this post is geared towards psychologists in the United States and Canada. If you are in another country, your mileage may vary.)

Clinical psychologists can work:

• In medical hospitals
• In psychiatric hospitals
• In research hospitals
• In forensic hospitals
• In state and federal institutions
• In private institutions
• In prisons and other forensic settings
• At Veteran’s Affairs
• At the Department of Defense
• In community mental health settings
• In outpatient clinics
• In private practices
• In universities
• In rehabilitation centers
• In halfway houses
• In residential settings
• In research settings
• In advocacy settings
• In policy settings
• In administrative settings

Clinical psychologists work with:

• People diagnosed with mental illnesses
• People diagnosed with physical illnesses
• People currently experiencing distress or dysfunction
• The families, loved ones, or other people associated with the people mentioned above
• Other people for lots of reasons. Typically clinical psychologists work with a more severe population (people experiencing more significant problems) compared to counseling psychologists (who often focus on things like wellbeing), but not always.

Clinical psychologists can work with:

• All ages
• All genders
• All sexual orientations
• All cultural and ethnic backgrounds
• All abilities
• All educational levels
• All socioeconomic backgrounds
• All religions
• All people in general, as long as the particular clinical psychologist is competent to treat that particular person and their particular presenting problem(s)

Clinical psychologists have extremely varied responsibilities and day-to-day tasks, including:

  • Clinical work
    • Individual therapy
    • Group therapy
    • Couples’ therapy
    • Family therapy
    • Diagnostic assessments
    • Neuropsychology assessments
    • Disability assessments
    • Functional assessments
    • Legal assessments
    • Aptitude assessments
    • Intellectual assessments
    • Needs assessments
    • Creating treatment plans
    • Monitoring treatment progress
    • Coordinating care
  • Research
    • Creating research ideas and questions
    • Conducting literature reviews
    • Applying for grants
    • Conducting research
    • Conducting clinical work within research projects
    • Analyzing data
    • Writing journal articles, books, and chapters
    • Presenting findings at conferences and other events
    • Disseminating research to non-academics, including mental health clinicians
    • Applying research in real world settings (for example, implementing a new treatment found to be helpful)
  • Teaching
  • Mentoring
    • Mentoring undergraduate students, graduate students, interns, postdoctoral fellows, early career psychologists, research assistants
  • Supervising
    • Supervising clinical work
    • Supervising research
  • Training other clinicians
  • Administration
    • Leading a mental health team
    • Leading a mental health treatment program
    • Leading a research lab
    • Leading a psychology department
  • Developing new treatments
  • Developing new treatment programs
  • Developing new policies
  • Evaluating treatments
  • Evaluating treatment programs
  • Evaluating policies
  • Consulting

13 not-easy steps to becoming a clinical psychologist

1. Complete a bachelor’s degree
You will need a bachelor’s degree to get into graduate school. The easiest route to a PhD/PsyD in clinical psychology is a psychology BA or BS, possibly with another major or minor in something like biology or sociology (meaning, something connected to your interests in psychology). However, a degree in psychology is not required to get into a PhD/PsyD program in clinical psychology. If you do not major in psychology, you may need to take post-baccalaureate classes later as most PhD/PsyD programs require specific psychology classes, usually including intro, abnormal, and research & statistics.

2. Get research experience
You will need research experience to get into a PhD/PsyD program in clinical psychology. I recommend at least two years and at least two presentations. You can do this while in undergrad or afterwards. You don’t need to do research full-time (5-10 hours/week is okay) but you do need to learn about research while doing it. Don’t accept a position where all you do is data entry or mundane tasks like that. Be a part of the action- developing research ideas, conducting research, analyzing data, presenting findings. Learn all that you can from your supervisor and other people involved. Use this time to develop research skills and become better at understanding other peoples’ research and developing your own.

3. Get clinical experience (optional)
You do not need clinical experience to get into a PhD/PsyD program, but it might help. I tend to recommend it so that you can get experience in a clinical setting and/or with a clinical population so you understand better what you’re getting into. 

4. Get teaching experience (optional)
You do not need teaching experience to get into a PhD/PsyD program, but it might help. 

5. Get a master’s degree (optional)
Some people choose to get a master’s degree in clinical psychology, counseling, or experimental psychology before applying to PhD/PsyD programs. I only recommend this if you need to show you have an improved GPA and/or you want to use a master’s program to get research experience. In either case I recommend a experimental psychology program first, and then clinical psychology. 

6. Apply to PhD and/or PsyD programs in clinical psychology
You need to get in to go! (here is a post about applying to PhD/PsyD programs and a post about picking the best programs)

7. Complete a PhD or PsyD program in clinical psychology
This is the key thing. While you are in your program, get varied experience in different clinical settings with different clinical populations. Get involved with research. Say yes to many opportunities but say no to things you’re not interested in or don’t have time for. Don’t stick only to your number 1 interest- try different things, explore the possibilities. Listen to feedback and use it to get better but don’t take criticism as a comment on you as a person. Publish. Get involved with leadership and/or administrative roles. Essentially, build an impressive CV that shows that you have well-rounded skills and experience, but also are creating a niche of your own expertise. See this ask for more.

8. Complete a dissertation
The major research milestone in a PhD/PsyD program (of any type) is the dissertation. This is your major research project, where you start to carve out your area of expertise in your field. You use the dissertation to show what you’ve learned, to learn new things, and to add something important to your field. It is an enormous and difficult undertaking, but so worth it. I recommend you pick something that is achievable in the amount of time you have left (don’t make your goal “discover all genes that cause depression,” make it “determine whether cortisol is higher among people with chronic depression compared to acute depression”) and something that you will enjoy enough to keep you motivated during the years you will be working on that project.

9. Apply for a predoctoral internship program
The last clinical milestone is a pre-doctoral internship. A match process is how it’s determined where each student applying for an internship goes (similar to medical school residency programs). Students apply for internships around the United States and Canada in the fall, and interview in December and January. Students each rank the places they interviewed at in the order of their preference, and put that ranking into an online system. Each internship does the same- ranks each student in order of their preference. The system “matches” each student with an internship, attempting to match each student with the highest ranked internship possible. However, there are more students applying each year than internships, so every year students go unmatched. This year about 82% of students matched, and of those, 80% matched to an accredited internship. Accreditation is very important for future licensure and employment. This gap in matching is one reason to go to a really really good graduate program- better programs have better match rates, and many internship programs won’t review applications from students who go to unaccredited or low quality schools. See this ask for more. 

10. Complete a pre-doctoral internship program in clinical psychology
This is your last big chance to get clinical experience. So my advice is to look for programs that will help you fill important gaps in your training (for example, are you interested in PTSD but don’t have experience in Cognitive Processing Therapy? Find a program that trains in CPT) and helps you fill out your area of expertise. So, both broaden and deepen your experience. Find programs that are really interested in training you and not just getting a cheap therapist for a year. Look for places that often hire their interns as postdocs or staff psychologists, and for places that send interns to the sorts of postdocs or jobs you will want. 

11. Receive your PhD or PsyD
You’re done! Congratulations! (Remember to do your exit counseling!)

12. Apply for and complete a postdoctoral fellowship (optional)
Many (maybe most) psychologists do a postdoctoral fellowship. A postdoctoral fellowship or residency is additional training after you finish your doctoral degree.  Typical clinical postdocs are 1 year, research postdocs are 2 years, and speciality training postdocs like neuropsychology are 2 years. However some postdocs might be longer or shorter. You might do one so you can gain specific training you want or need- for example, clinical psychologists specializing in neuropsychology nearly always do a postdoc in neuropsychology (and have to in order to be boarded as a neuropsychologist), or you might want training in a particular area of research you don’t have. You might do one so you can get licensed because many jobs require applicants to already be licensed or license-eligible (and many states require supervised hours post-degree and/or other requirements). You might do one because you want a research job and it’s difficult to get one without a postdoc, particularly in academia or academia-adjacent positions. You might do one because you want to get in with a specific institution and they don’t have a job for you that year (many places hire from within, particularly from their intern and postdoc pool). 

13. Get licensed
Clinical psychologists generally get licensed within a 2-3 years of graduating (but it’s possible to do it sooner). State requirements vary a lot, so do your research so you can a) get licensed in the state you want to right now, and b) make it possible to get licensed in other states you might want to in the future. Licensure in the US always requires passing the EPPP, the national licensing exam and graduation from an APA-accredited or equivalent graduate program and internship. Many states have additional requirements like 1500 post-degree supervised clinical hours, a state exam, or additional coursework. The process is long and expensive (like everything else in this process). 

14. Get a job
This is when you finally get to be a full-fledged clinical psychologist! There are many jobs available for psychologists, but the biggest areas of need are rural and other poorly served areas. Think about what’s most important to you- type of position, type of institution, money, location, etc. –and find something that’ll work for you. 

So how long will this take?

A typical path to being a clinical psychologist looks like this:

  • Bachelor’s degree: 4 years
  • Postgraduate research experience (optional): 2 years
  • PhD/PsyD: 4-6 years
  • Predoctoral internship: 1 year
  • Postdoctoral fellowship (optional): 1-2 years (get licensed during this)
  • Job! 

So an average range is 9 to 15 years from beginning your undergraduate degree to starting your first job as a licensed clinical psychologist. Some people will need more time but it’s very unlikely to do it faster than this.

You keep mentioning “APA” and “accreditation.” What’s that?

APA is the American Psychological Association, and it is the main body that accredits (recognizes as quality and meeting minimum standards) graduate programs, Predoctoral internships, and postdoctoral fellowships in psychology. The Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), California Psychology Internship Council (CAPIC), and Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS) are also reputable and professionally recognized accrediting bodies.

It is essential to go to an APA-, CPA- and/or PCSAS-accredited graduate program and a APA-, CPA-, CAPIC- and/or PCSAS-accredited internship. It will be difficult to get licensed and get a job if you don’t. Accreditation also protects students. (Also, unaccredited schools are unaccredited because they are not good schools. The accrediting standards are not very high). You don’t need an accredited postdoc, but you might choose to get one because it’s likely to make it easier to get licensed and boarded, and it may make you more marketable.