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Tom Hiddleston Reveals Why Loki Isn't Impressed By Doctor Strange
If you were one of the millions who saw Doctor Strange, then you know the sorcerer has a bit of a bone to pick with Loki.

The film’s post-credit scene saw Doctor Strange meet with Thor who was on the hunt for his brother, and the magical hero was quick to take a few shots at the devious Frost Giant. Later this year, fans will likely get to see how Doctor Strange does with Loki when Thor: Ragnarok makes its way to theaters, but don’t expect the latter to be impressed by Strange’s gifts.

According to Tom Hiddleston, Loki will be rather apathetic towards Doctor Strange’s mystical powers.

Recently, the actor sat down for an interview with IGN where he was asked about Loki’s reaction to characters like Doctor Strange. In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, much of what has kept Loki unique is his magical gifts, so the entrance of beings like Strange and even Hela could be a threat to Loki. However, Hiddleston doesn’t seem to think that’s the case.

“I think he probably dismisses Strange,” Hiddleston said about Loki. “Yes, his sorcery is very impressive, but Loki’s been doing that for century so who cares? But Hela is a different beast and full of surprises. [She] actually might have been someone with whom he actually got along, but the circumstances have changed.”

As for what those circumstances are, fans will have to wait and see. So far, it looks like Hela will force Loki to work alongside his brother out of self-interest and desire to stay alive. Hiddleston has hinted Hela would be one of the main factors which reunited the brothers in Thor: Ragnarok.

“At the beginning of Ragnarok, Thor has a lot of questions, and Loki - true to form - is not that forthcoming with many answers. But hammers are involved and the stakes are raised,” Hiddleston told IGN.

“Cate Blanchett is playing the goddess of death who brings destruction in her wake. It’s the kind of destruction that both Thor and Loki have never seen, on a scale of terror they’ve never ever seen before. So, they fall back on their brotherhood fractured though it is to see what they can do to stop her.

Are you excited to see what could be Hiddleston’s final portrayal of Loki? Let us know with your vote in our Anticipation Rankings! It is currently ranked at #9 on all of ComicBook.

[Watch the video of the interview on IGN]

Black history month day 22: Renowned neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson.

Benjamin Solomon “Ben” Carson Sr. was born in Detroit, Michigan on September 18, 1951. When he was eight, his parents separated and he moved with his mother and brother to his mother’s sister’s home. Carson’s mother struggled with severe depression, resulting in several psychiatric hospitalizations and an attempted suicide. She was however very involved with her sons’ education, limiting their time watching television and requiring them to read and write book reports on two library books per week.

Carson had dreams of being a doctor since he was eight. He did well in school and scored very highly on the SAT for the Detroit school district. When it came time to choose a college, he narrowed the choice between Harvard or Yale, but could only for the $10 application fee for one school. He chose Yale after seeing them win a televised G.E. college bowl against Harvard. He received a full scholarship. Later he attended medical school at the university of Michigan and was excepted into the neurosurgery program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Carson was the Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Maryland from 1984 until his retirement in 2013. He was indisputably a pioneer in neurosurgery, his achievements including performing the only successful separation of conjoined twins joined at the back of the head, the first successful neurosurgical procedure on a fetus inside the womb, and the first completely successful separation of type-2 vertical craniopagus twins. He also developed new methods to treat brain-stem tumors and improved techniques for controlling seizures. At age 33 he became the youngest head of pediatric neurosurgery in the country. He has written over 100 neurosurgical publications and received numerous accolades, including over 60 honorary doctorate degrees, dozens of national merit citations, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States.