do-androids-dream-of-electric-sheep

These words will outlive Rutger. They will outlive Harrison, and Ridley, and each of us. And even long after the last memory of Blade Runner fades away, these words will be again stumbled upon, and rediscovered by those who are not yet born - whatever their language, whatever their shape. For that which is true remains and recurs.

You will be required to do wrong no matter where you go. It is the basic condition of life, to be required to violate your own identity. At some time, every creature which lives must do so. It is the ultimate shadow, the defeat of creation; this is the curse at work, the curse that feeds on all life. Everywhere in the universe.
—  Philip K. Dick (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?)
He thought, too, about his need for a real animal; within him an actual hatred once more manifested itself toward his electric sheep, which he had to tend, had to care about, as if it lived. The tyranny of an object, he thought. It doesn’t know I exist. Like the androids, it had no ability to appreciate the existence of another. He had never thought of this before, the similarity between an electric animal and an andy. The electric animal, he pondered, could be considered a subform of the other, a kind of vastly inferior robot. Or, conversely, the android could be regarded as a highly developed, evolved version of the ersatz animal. Both viewpoints repelled him.
—  Philip K. Dick, excerpt from his novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep